Cuban women meet in New York City

first_imgMaritzel González-Quevedo Alicia Campos Pérez The International Working Women’s Coalition hosted a reception and political discussion with two Cuban women revolutionaries at the Solidarity Center in New York City on March 21.The honored guests were Alicia Campos Pérez, coordinator of the International Democratic Federation of Women (FDIM), and Maritzel González-Quevedo, an official for Foreign Affairs in the Federation of Cuban Women (FMC).The FMC, which was founded by the late Vilma Espín in 1960, immediately following the victory of the Cuban revolution, is a member of the FDIM, an alliance of left-political women’s organizations working for women’s liberation.Both speakers discussed the contributions that women have made throughout Latin America and the Caribbean — and especially under socialism in Cuba — in the struggle to further advance the liberation of women from the yoke of imperialism and capitalism.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

Fort Worth’s first community fridge program helps serve vulnerable neighborhoods

first_imgLife in Fort Worth A fox’s tail: the story of TCU’s campus foxes Twitter Haeven Gibbonshttps://www.tcu360.com/author/haeven-gibbons/ + posts Welcome TCU Class of 2025 Twitter Haeven Gibbonshttps://www.tcu360.com/author/haeven-gibbons/ Linkedin Facebook Previous articleHoroscope: April 28, 2021Next articleAcademic and writing resources help play a role in TCU’s retention rate Haeven Gibbons Grains to grocery: One bread maker brings together farmers and artisans at locally-sourced store TCU places second in the National Student Advertising Competition, the highest in school history Welcome TCU Class of 2025 printCommunity fridge dataThe story behind the fridgeHow Tarrant Area Food Bank is stepping up tooNew organization fights hunger in Fort Worth’s most vulnerable neighborhoods By Haeven GibbonsThe pandemic and its subsequent economic upheaval prompted one Fort Worth native to adopt a creative approach in nourishing people living in some of Tarrant County’s hungriest ZIP codes. Kendra Richardson started Fort Worth’s first community fridge program, Funky Town Fridge, to give people access to food from refrigerators stocked by the community.The Southside fridge is filled with fresh produce and water. (Photo courtesy of @funkytownfridge Instagram)The Southside fridge is filled with fresh produce and water. (Photo courtesy of @funkytownfridge Instagram)Kendra Richardson poses in front of the Poly fridge. (Photo: Haeven Gibbons)Kendra Richardson poses in front of the Poly fridge. (Photo: Haeven Gibbons)“I think the fridges are great mechanisms in our community to help feed those who may not ask for help or food in other ways,” said Lauren Selking, a Fort Worth citizen who donates to the fridge at least once a month. Richardson opened three fridges, each in Fort Worth zip code areas with limited access to grocery stores.Fort Worth locals donated all three fridges to Richardson. The fridges look like they could be found in a kitchen, except they have all been decked out by local artists. Kendra Richardson talks about why and how she started Funky Town Fridge. The fridge is housed inside of a wooden shed to protect it from weather. There’s also space for non-perishable food items and non-food items like hand sanitizer, toilet paper, pet supplies, baby formula and hygiene products. In early July, Richardson saw stories about fridges in Houston and New Orleans. She started to search for her own fridges and reach out to possible host buildings to start her own community fridge project. By Sept. 26, 2020, Fort Worth’s fridges were open.  The Southside fridge is located at 3144 Bryan Avenue. (Photo courtesy of @funkytownfridge Instagram)The Southside fridge is located at 3144 Bryan Avenue. (Photo courtesy of @funkytownfridge Instagram)The Poly fridge is located at 2308 Vaughn Blvd. (Photo courtesy of @funkytownfridge Instagram)The Poly fridge is located at 2308 Vaughn Blvd. (Photo courtesy of @funkytownfridge Instagram)The Como fridge is located at 5705 Wellesley Ave. (Photo courtesy of @funkytownfridge Instagram).The Como fridge is located at 5705 Wellesley Ave. (Photo courtesy of @funkytownfridge Instagram).“I knew that this was something that Fort Worth needed,” Richardson said. “I wanted to show what action looked like. I created an Instagram to try to start get the word out.”She placed the first fridge at 3144 Bryan Ave. in the Southside neighborhood. The others are in Poly and Como. “There are no grocery stores anywhere in these neighborhoods where I now have fridges,” Richardson said.Getting startedIt took some time for people to understand how the fridges worked.  “The concept is hard for people to grasp. You’re not used to seeing a refrigerator outside with a shed,” Richardson said. “I understand, I get it, but now more and more people are understanding.” Once people started to understand the concept, her vision came to life. People started donating fridges, offering their building to be used as a host and donating food.“It kind of took legs of its own and grew,” said Richardson. “I think now people see how dire the need is, and I think now the community is more committed to keeping them filled. We’re learning as we go.”Photo 1: Danny Dye places a donation of pulled pork and a loaf of bread into a refrigerator on the street in the Coconut Grove neighborhood of Miami, Monday, Dec. 7, 2020 (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky)Photos 2: Beans and onions are just a few of the non-perishable items in the Poly fridge. (Haeven Gibbons)While community fridge programs have been around since 2015, more community fridge programs have popped up across the United States since the beginning of the pandemic, according to the Freedge database. Freedge is an international network that was established in 2014 to promote and support community fridges. Freedge keeps track of community fridge programs around the world. The database shows 325 community fridges worldwide, with 169 located in the United States alone. Of the 325 fridges logged, 96 of them show the fridge installation date, with 42 installed between 2020 and 2021.“We’re not just giving people anything that we just don’t want,” Richardson said. “They’re getting good quality food from Whole Foods, Sprouts, Central Market and everywhere else.” People can bring fresh produce, bottled water, butter, yogurt, milk, frozen meat and eggs. But community members should avoid putting items in the fridge like raw meat, homemade meals, soda and any non-nutritious food.  “My sister Mallory and I have donated to the fridge six times now,” said Fort Worth resident Melany Krazer. “We try to drop off once a week to once every two weeks. It depends on if we get enough goodies together or not that week.”Krazer said she learned about the fridge from her sister, who saw it on Instagram. To keep the fridges full, Richardson posts on Instagram to let the community know they need donations. “Kendra does a great job shouting out to the community when the fridges are in need, and it seems the community always comes through in one form or another,” said Krazer. “It does seem that the community does a great job helping to keep them all full. I have seen nonprofits in the area, restaurants and small businesses step up and contribute too.”Richardson posts on social media to let the community know when a fridge needs to be filled. (Photo courtesy @funkytownfridge Instagram)Richardson posts on social media to let the community know when a fridge needs to be filled. (Photo courtesy @funkytownfridge Instagram)Just hours after posting that the fridge needed to be filled, Richardson posted an update showing the results. (Photo courtesy @funkytownfridge Instagram)Just hours after posting that the fridge needed to be filled, Richardson posted an update showing the results. (Photo courtesy @funkytownfridge Instagram)The community is the grassroots of the project; anyone can stock the fridge at any time and anyone can take food whenever they need it. While Richardson and her team of volunteers check in on the fridges to make sure it is being filled with healthy food, it is up to the community to keep it full.  “I can’t come and fill the fridge every 30 minutes. But even if I did that wouldn’t be sustainable. I am trying to sustain this thing,” Richardson said.The Krazer sisters have donated produce, almond milk, breads, canned goods, shelf-stable items like mac and cheese, tuna and spaghetti, fridge items, frozen goods, drinks, cereals, shampoos and conditioners, hygiene items and books.“We always help and donate when we can,” Krazer said. “Mutual aid is a very neat concept because it isn’t necessarily donating, it’s giving what you can and taking what you need. You don’t have to jump through hoops to receive any items – it’s just there when you need it. I love that.”Melany Krazer took a photo of the products she collected for and donated to Funky Town Fridge. (Photo courtesy: Melany Krazer)The fridges make food easily accessible. Since the fridges are located in the neighborhoods where people need food, they do not have to worry about transportation to get to the food or about arriving at a certain time to pick it up. “I believe they [the fridges] are serving so many members in our community who may not know where else to go,” Selking said. “We actually saw a gentleman when we were dropping food off and he was so kind and thankful. It feels good to know you are helping provide nutritional food for those that may not have access to it.”Photo 1: Volunteers stock a refrigerator with free food for people in need in Los Angeles on July 20, 2020. (AP Photo/Aron Ranen)Photo 2: Volunteers pass out information on the COVID-19 vaccine as people receive food from the 24-hour community fridge at the community center Mixteca during the coronavirus pandemic, Saturday, Feb. 13, 2021, in the Brooklyn borough of New York. (AP Photo/Eduardo Munoz Alvarez)Anyone can open a community fridge if they find a local business to agree to let the fridge be placed outside their building. The host building provides the electricity to keep the fridge running. Some community fridge programs are a part of larger networks like Los Angeles Community Fridges (LACF) and  A New World In Our Hearts NYC, but others are fully run by individuals and their team of volunteers.  The story behind the fridgeRichardson, who teaches high school world geography, grew up in the Stop 6 neighborhood where she constantly saw people around her in need. “The more that people learn about the fridges, it brings awareness to how these communities have been suffering in Fort Worth,” Richardson said. “I started the fridge because there were already black communities in Fort Worth that were suffering from racism and then the pandemic hit, so I wanted to make sure that I did something to help ease the burden or make it a little bit better.”Richardson said it’s not just about providing the community with food, it is about making a lasting difference in these neighborhoods and addressing the systems that allow hunger to persist.“There was always a need,” Richardson said. “People still don’t have jobs; people are still living in poverty. All this was way before the pandemic. The pandemic just made it worse or it either highlighted what people are going through.”Now that there is an accessible resource in these communities, Richardson said the food is gone all the time.How Tarrant Area Food Bank is stepping up tooLarger food banks in Fort Worth have also stepped up during the pandemic to help ease the burden that underserved communities face.“In 2020 we actually became aware that there’s places in Tarrant County – there are certain zip codes that we’re not servicing as well as we could be,” said Tarrant Area Food Bank’s (TAFB) digital marketing specialist, Whitney Atkinson.Tarrant Area Food Bank has been working with their partner agencies to reassess where to place food distributions so that the people who need them the most can access food easily.“For the people who have never had access to these resources before, we educate them about what we can offer them and then we put those services in places that are accessible to them in the future,” Atkinson said. “We’re going to be servicing Tarrant County a lot more well-roundedly.”While the pandemic allowed TAFB to re-access the allocation of their resources, the number of people they served at distributions skyrocketed, reaching a 40% increase.Experts say the increase is no surprise.Photo 1: Soldier from the U.S. Army 36th Infantry Division help distribute turkeys and other holiday food items during a Tarrant Area Food Bank mobile pantry event in Arlington, Texas, Friday, Nov. 20, 2020. (AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez)Photo 2: Volunteer Jill Erny, right, of Coppell, Texas, offers cartons of eggs to a driver. (AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez)Photo 3: Volunteer Allison Clark of Fort Worth, Texas, helps guide thousands of vehicles into a parking lot outside of AT&T Stadium during a Tarrant Area Food Bank mobile pantry distribution event in Arlington, Texas, Friday, Nov. 20, 2020. (AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez)“People act shocked by what’s happened, but it’s utterly predictable given the vast inequality of wealth and the low wages,” said the CEO of Hunger Free America, Joel Berg. “Even before the pandemic, there were tens of millions of Americans who just didn’t earn enough to get all the food they needed.”The rise in people who are seeking assistance for the first time are mostly people who were on the edge of hunger before the pandemic hit, according to Berg.“We’ve had a whole lot of first-time users that are depending on us to bring food,” said the TAFB’s director of operations, Val Aguilar.TAFB’s mega mobile distributionTAFB started its first-ever mega mobile distribution in September. The food bank normally relies on its partner agencies to distribute food, but most of these smaller agencies had to close temporarily due to COVID-19. Every Friday, cars lined up by the thousands to wait for their box of food to be placed in the trunk of their car.“It’s a lot to come out here to stay a long time, but it’s what you have to do to survive,” said a woman who attended the distribution on February 12. She had been waiting in line for four hours.Some of the clients at the distribution said they have struggled with hunger before, but never to this capacity.“We are struggling right now. We are enduring something that we have never endured before. By coming here, it allows us to make several meals that we wouldn’t have,” an attendee said.Tarrant Area Food Bank is ending its mega mobile distribution at the end of May. The majority of their partner agencies (85%) have been able to fully reopen, resuming mobile distribution of their own. As many of these agencies have reopened, TAFB has seen the lines at its distributions shorten.Mobile distributions by partner agencies happen every day of the week except Sundays.“No one organization or one sector has the capacity to end hunger by themselves,” said the founder and executive director of the Baylor Collaborative on Hunger and Poverty, Jeremy Everett.Local organizations, large and small, are doing their part to address hunger in Tarrant County.  “As long as these hosts allow them (the community fridges) to be here, they’ll be here, and they’ll service every community that they’re in. I can rest in the fact knowing that I did something to create some kind of change in the world to make other people better, not just myself,” Richardson said.Photo 1: Volunteers sort and box food at Tarrant Area Food Bank. (Photo: Haeven Gibbons)Photo 2: Kendra Richardson and one of her volunteers organize the canned goods at the Poly community fridge. (Photo: Haeven Gibbons)TopBuilt with Shorthand Haeven Gibbonshttps://www.tcu360.com/author/haeven-gibbons/ Image Magazine: Spring 2021 NewsCommunityCOVID-19In-depth reportingMultimediaThe 109The 109 NewsTop StoriesFort Worth’s first community fridge program helps serve vulnerable neighborhoodsBy Haeven Gibbons – April 28, 2021 917 Linkedin ReddIt Haeven Gibbons Haeven Gibbonshttps://www.tcu360.com/author/haeven-gibbons/ World Oceans Day shines spotlight on marine plastic pollution Vintage fever: Fort Worth residents and vintage connoisseurs talk about their passion for thrifting ReddIt RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Facebooklast_img read more

Facing reality after the Euromaidan: RSF presents a new report on Ukraine

first_img Ukraine escalates “information war” by banning three pro-Kremlin media Follow the news on Ukraine Ukrainian media group harassed by broadcasting authority Reporters Without Borders (RSF) releases today its new report about the situation of journalists and media in Ukraine, in English and French. UkraineEurope – Central Asia Reports and statisticsProtecting journalistsOnline freedomsMedia independence Conflicts of interestEconomic pressureWhistleblowersArmed conflictsFreedom of expressionInternet to go further RecommendationsRSF asks the Ukrainian government and President Petro Poroshenko to: Put into practice the law on greater transparency of media ownership. Break up President Poroshenko’s control over private “Channel 5” news network. Related documents RSF Ukraine report_2016PDF – 3.47 MB The war in the East of the country and the massive amount of Russian propaganda against Ukraine have also led to controversial countermeasures in Kiev, which partially restrict media freedom. In August 2014, the Ukrainian government blocked the signal of 15 Russian television providers. The broadcasting of numerous Russian TV-shows and movies was banned the following year. Many foreign journalists and bloggers are banned from travelling in Ukraine. Some media professionals are tempted by a form of “patriotic journalism”. July 11, 2016 Facing reality after the Euromaidan: RSF presents a new report on Ukraine RSF recommends that Ukrainian journalists critically examine the obvious relationship between commercial and editorial content, and have an open debate about patriotism and journalism.RSF calls on the OSCE presidency to oblige the conflicting parties in Eastern Ukraine to grant journalists free access to the self-proclaimed People’s Republic of Luhansk and People’s Republic of Donetsk.Any closer association between Ukraine and the EU should be made contingent on the Ukrainian government refraining from obstructing the development of a pluralistic media landscape and guaranteeing media freedom.RSF appeals to foreign governments, charities and donor organizations to more actively and lastingly support reform efforts of their Ukrainian colleagues. News UkraineEurope – Central Asia Reports and statisticsProtecting journalistsOnline freedomsMedia independence Conflicts of interestEconomic pressureWhistleblowersArmed conflictsFreedom of expressionInternet News February 26, 2021 Find out more Read the reportThis report, authored by RSF-Germany and already published in German, is titled “Facing reality after the Euromaidan.” It describes the fragile situation of a country in which journalists are generally able to work freely and engage in investigative reporting, but yet face immense problems. The main TV networks in the country are concentrated in the hands of a few oligarchs, who misuse them for their own political gains and business interests. The financial crisis makes it difficultfor independent media outlets to develop functional business models. There are also large gaps in the training of journalists.“The situation in Ukraine offers many prospects, but the bases of a pluralistic media landscape require our assistance”, said RSF-Germany board member Gemma Pörzgen. “After the initial optimism during the Euromaidan movement, many journalists have become disillusioned. They are faced with the triple challenge of the war in the Eastern part of the country, the economic crisis and the digitalization of mass media.” More strongly support the conversion of the Ukrainian state broadcaster into a public-service broadcaster. Organisation News Reports With financial support of the Robert-Bosh Foundation,Pörzgen conducted research in Ukraine in January and February and interviewed more than 30 journalists and media experts. The study is limited to the Ukrainian government-held part of the country. Private television networks in the hands of oligarchs Despite all of its restrictions, Ukraine – which is ranked 107th out of 180 in RSF’s latest World Press Freedom Index – has a vibrant and diverse media landscape. In general, journalists are allowed to engage in investigative journalism, report critically, and develop media projects without government influence.Nonetheless, the influential private television networks are still controlled by oligarchs. The dependence on the funding of businessmen like Dmytro Firtash, Ihor Kolomoysky, Viktor Pinchuk or Rinat Akhmetov isgreater, as the Ukrainian advertising market is in further decline. The billionaires do not need to earn money through their media networks: they run them only as a kind of PR department to protect their other businesses, and finance their media outlets as a sideline. Viewers are increasingly witnessing full-blown “information wars” in which competing oligarchs fight out their private feuds via their television channelsRSF has been deepening its research on the ownership structure of the Ukrainian media since June, with its partner-organization in Kiev, the Institute of Mass Information, in the framework of the Media Ownership Monitor project. The results of this study will be published in September.The challenge of war and propaganda Revoke the ban on Russian books and films and remove all journalists from travel ban lists. March 26, 2021 Find out more Help by sharing this information RSF_en Receive email alerts Clearly distance themselves from the controversial Ukrainian website Myrotvorets and other attempts to discredit and intimidate journalists for their reporting from Eastern Ukraine. Crimean journalist “confesses” to spying for Ukraine on Russian TV September 7, 2020 Find out morelast_img read more

Audio Update – Donegal County Council’s “Road Safe” roadshow in its 9th year

first_img Facebook By admin – October 13, 2015 Twitter Google+ Need for issues with Mica redress scheme to be addressed raised in Seanad also 70% of Cllrs nationwide threatened, harassed and intimidated over past 3 years – Report Facebook Google+ RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Minister McConalogue says he is working to improve fishing quota WhatsApp Previous articleLGH facing fines for failure to meet waiting list targetsNext articleNo job at Derry for Kanchelskis admin center_img Homepage BannerNews Twitter WhatsApp Audio Update – Donegal County Council’s “Road Safe” roadshow in its 9th year Almost 2,600 students from across Donegal will attend the County Council’s annual Road Safe Road Show events taking place today and tomorrow.Now in its ninth year, the initiative is one of the most effective road safety promotion tools in Donegal.Earlier this month the council was been named winner of the “Road Safety Award 2015 in the Excellence in Business Awards by the Public Sector Magazine.The award acknowledges the work done by the Donegal Road Safety Working Group which hosts its annual road safety road show in Letterkenny today and tomorrow.Since the show was first held 9 years ago all schools in County Donegal have sent their Transition year, Leaving Cert Applied and fourth year students with Youthreach Centres, ETB participants also attending.The hard hitting shows tell in graphic detail the consequences of a road traffic collisions through presentations from the emergency services, people who have lost loved ones and those involved in crashes themselves.The shows are held in the Aura leisure centre.Donegal County Council’s Road Safety Officer Brian O’Donnell says they cannot be complacent…….Audio Playerhttp://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/bodweb.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. Pinterest Dail hears questions over design, funding and operation of Mica redress scheme Pinterest Man arrested in Derry on suspicion of drugs and criminal property offences released Dail to vote later on extending emergency Covid powerslast_img read more

Antenatal services to be restored in Inishowen

first_img News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th Google+ Pinterest By News Highland – June 29, 2020 Pinterest Twitter Derry draw with Pats: Higgins & Thomson Reaction FT Report: Derry City 2 St Pats 2 Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic Antenatal services are to be restored in Inishowen, after the previous service ceased in 2018.Deputy Padraig Mac Lochlainn says he had raised the issue with former Health Minister Simon Harris, and had hoped for progress before now.Management at Letterkenny University Hospital, responding on the Minister’s behalf, have now confirmed to him that they are planning to restore a midwifery led service to Inishowen.Deputy Mac Lochlainn says it is important these clinics are delivered in Buncrana and Carndonagh, as they were before……Audio Playerhttps://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Pagraigclinicsweb.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. Twitter Google+center_img RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR DL Debate – 24/05/21 Previous articleNew cabinet and Seanad meet for the first time todayNext articleNew Donegal GAA club time-frame and regional leagues confirmed News Highland Antenatal services to be restored in Inishowen WhatsApp WhatsApp Facebook AudioHomepage BannerNews Facebook Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population growslast_img read more

Donegal GAA on their bikes for Better Life for Livie Campaign

first_img Pinterest DL Debate – 24/05/21 AudioHomepage BannerNews Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic Previous articleIrish tourism may not recover until next year – AndrewsNext articleWorks to begin tomorrow from Circular Road Roundabout, Letterkenny News Highland Google+ Twitter RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Facebook Google+ Facebook Pinterestcenter_img Twitter Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows Donegal GAA on their bikes for Better Life for Livie Campaign WhatsApp By News Highland – July 19, 2020 Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA Donegal GAA Players are in the saddle as they shake buckets across the county today raising funds for the Better Life for Livie campaign.They’re taking donations to help 11-month-old Co Meath girl Olivia Mulhern, who has a severe degenerative genetic condition called spinal muscular atrophy.Unless she travels to the United States for cutting-edge gene therapy at a cost of 2.1 million dollars, it’s unlikely she’ll live past her second birthday.Caolan Hogan is urging people across the county to give generously.Audio Playerhttps://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/LivieFundraiser1pm.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.You can follow updates on the Official Donegal GAA Facebook page. WhatsApp News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th Nine til Noon Show – Listen back to Monday’s Programmelast_img read more

Emergency services at scene of crash on Buncrana to Fahan road

first_img RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Facebook DL Debate – 24/05/21 The road from Buncrana to Burnfoot is closed due to a road traffic collision at Duffy’s Garage Lisfannon.Emergency services are currently at the scene dealing with the three vehicle collision.Local diversions are in place from Buncrana via Aghilly Road to Tullydish Road on to the Back Hill Roads to the Half Way at Tooban.All HGV’s to divert via Buncrana to Carndonagh to Quigley’s Point to Muff. Donegal County Council is currently erecting signage.Gardai in Buncrana say the occupants of the vehicles have suffered injuries but are not believed to be serious.It is expected the road will reopen this evening at 5pm. News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th By News Highland – January 9, 2018 Nine til Noon Show – Listen back to Monday’s Programme Facebook WhatsApp WhatsApp Emergency services at scene of crash on Buncrana to Fahan road Pinterestcenter_img Google+ Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic Homepage BannerNews Previous articleOpening Short Stay ward at LUH will require substantial staff investmentNext articleCo Derry man admitted killing man with single punch News Highland Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA Twitter Twitter Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows Pinterest Google+last_img read more

Those who can, do teach

first_img Published 2:29 pm Thursday, September 9, 2010 Skip Sponsored Content For Percy, the faculty exhibition is an opportunity to share his journeys, both physical and philosophical. In essence, his work demonstrates a “sense of place.”“The four new pieces in the exhibit continue my exploration of the Kerygma Series which I began in 1993,” he said. “Formally, my hope is that the pieces draw the viewer into the same kind of visual and emotional stimuli I encounter on my journeys to the Sangre de Christo Mountains and the Desert Southwest.“On a much deeper level, each vessel is an exploration into finding that delicate balance we are forced to reconcile between the physical, mental and spiritual aspects of our lives. Each form is meant to physically resonate a strong ‘sense of place.’ The colors, textures and voids speak of sacred space, evoking a deep spirit of being. I never tire of this idea of journey and transformation, renewal and redemption.”Paxson said the Troy University Faculty Exhibition is interesting, exciting, awe inspiring and even a little whimsical.“On one side of the gallery are Bob Joslin’s outstanding photographs from his African safari and on the other side, you have Sara Dismukes’ vintage photographs of humans with dog heads. It’s an amazing exhibit.” Book Nook to reopen Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson Those who can, do teach The exhibition is a sampling of the artwork done by faculty members. There is no theme to the exhibition, therefore, it is open to the particular interest of the artists and includes sculptures in wood, clay and fiberglass and paintings, furniture, and installations.Faculty artists are Greg Skaggs, Pam Allen, Larry Percy, Sara Dismukes, Russell Everett, Bob Joslin, Calab Dawson, Beverly West Leach and Paxson.Much of Skaggs’ imagery in the exhibition comes from his childhood experiences. Print Article The Penny Hoarder Issues “Urgent” Alert: 6 Companies… By The Penny Hoardercenter_img Email the author Latest Stories Around the WebMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Blood Sugar BlasterIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthTop 4 Methods to Get Fortnite SkinsTCGThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancel The faculty exhibit is underway at Malone Gallery.Those who give any credence to the old cliché that “those who can do, those who can’t teach,” just haven’t been to the Troy University Faculty Exhibition at Malone Gallery.Each year, the university’s art department presents either an alumni exhibition or a faculty show. Since it had been several years, since a faculty show, Duane Paxson, gallery director, said a faculty exhibition was in order.“Those who haven’t had the opportunity to visit the gallery are encouraged to do so,” Paxson said. “It’s an outstanding exhibit that features the varied works of our faculty.” Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration By Jaine Treadwell Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits “As a child, I loved to play war with the neighborhood children,” Skaggs said. “My Dad was a Marine in the Vietnam War as well as many of my friends and most of us played with the same kit that our fathers brought home from the war. The romantic ideals of Americans defeating the Nazis and cowboys taming the Indians were often re-enacted on the neighborhood battlefields. These childhood memories are happy ones.”Skaggs said that the images are visual juxtapositions between the innocence of a child and the violence that is created by our modern society.“In turn, violent tendencies of children are often acted out through play,” he said. “Though not a blatant attempt at pointing out the inconsistencies with our modern culture, these pieces contain conceptual clues that the viewer will be able to recognize and make connections.”Allen’s “Sense of Place” series started while on sabbatical in 2005, formulating then what she calls a seasonal journey.“Wanting the paintings to suggest nostalgia, I developed a strong need to visit the past and address the present simultaneously,” Allen said. “I began with four artworks that depict the seasons. Each painting became an exploration of nature and natural occurrences and events associated with the subject.“They chart memories of places and significant ‘things’ that have strong meaning or absolutely no significance except that I had a compulsory need in include them within the composition.”Allen said that, categorically landscapes, her works provide the viewer with a true sense of place without depicting representational scenes by traditional means.last_img read more

Arts grants benefit locals

first_imgLatest Stories Skip Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day “The arts are alive in Brundidge, in great part, because of the support of the Alabama State Council on the Arts and we greatly appreciate their support,” Bowden said. “And, not only of our organization, but of the arts in Pike County and all around the state.”Kari Barley, Pioneer Museum of Alabama director, said the ASCA grant is greatly appreciated and will make it possible to bring students from area schools to Pioneer Days in October.“The ASCA grant funds will be used to bus students to Pioneer Days,” Barley said.“Many schools are not able to provide transportation to our folk history day. Producing art is fruitless unless there’s someone to witness it. By providing bus mileage, students from Pike County and from Montgomery to Dothan and in between are able to have this experience. The ASCA grant makes it possible and we are thankful for it.” Arts grants benefit locals By Jaine Treadwell Around the WebMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Blood Sugar BlasterIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthTop 4 Methods to Get Fortnite SkinsTCGThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancel Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration Sponsored Content The Alabama State Council on the Arts (ASCA) awarded 120 grants totaling $1,568, 605 at its meeting in Troy on Sept. 4. This round of grants will support arts in education, folk art, community, literature, performing and visual arts programs Oct. 1, 2014 through Sept. 30, 2015.Several Pike County arts organizations were notified last week that they had received ASCA funding. The Brundidge Historical Society, the Pioneer Museum of Alabama, The Troy Arts Council and the Troy-Pike Cultural Arts Center received a total of $16,915 for programs and events.The Brundidge Historical Society received a grant award of $1,000 for its annual Chili Country Christmas supper, songs and stories event. The Pioneer Museum’s grant award was in the amount of $4,500 for Pioneer Days in October. The Troy Arts Council received $8,790 for its performing arts season and the Cultural Arts Center was awarded funding in the amount of $2,625 for the ArtBridges in School program. Barley said 1,200 students participate in Pioneer Days in 2013.“It was great fun and learning experience for them,” she said. “Pioneer Days brings history to life as students get to see first-hand how Alabama pioneers lived and worked.”Old-time demonstrations will include woodworking, blacksmithing, wood stove cooking, quilting, spinning and weaving and tin crafting. Some of the activities are hands-on and provide a greater understanding and appreciation of the folk art.Ruth Walker, Troy Arts Council president, said the TAC is most appreciative of the support of the Alabama State Council on the Arts.“The support the Troy Arts Council receives from ASCA is extremely important to our programming,” Walker said. “ASCA’s support makes much of what we do possible. We greatly appreciate the grants that we receive. ASCA was very generous to us in the recent round of awards in support of our performing art season.”The TAC has seven events planned and the grant funds will be used to bring these events to Troy, Walker said.Vivace, a quartet of pop and classical singers, opened the TAC season Tuesday. The grant will also support the TAC’s other events, “Sally Mayes, Broadway Babe” in October, The Harlem String Quartet in November, Shelia Jackson and Company in December and the Texas Guitar Quartet in February. The Vienna Boys Choir will return to the Crosby Theater by popular demand in March.“These are all high quality concerts and ones that you would expect to find in large cities,” Walker said. “We are honored to be able to bring them to Troy and thank ASCA for helping make them happen.”For the Johnson Center for the Arts, the grant award is an opportunity to increase its art education program.“The Johnson Center’s ArtBridges program includes a summer teachers’ workshop, which is lead by a highly recognized Alabama artist,” said Wiley White, Center development director.“Teachers in all Pike County schools are invited to attend and learn more and different way to incorporate the arts into the curriculum.”White said the conducting artist returns to the county during the fall school term and actually works with teachers and their students in the schools.“The teachers who attend the workshop have priority when requesting an artist presentation in the classroom,” White said. “By going into the classrooms, hundreds of students get to work with and learn from a master artist. We appreciate ASCA’s support as we continue to offer art education programs in the schools of Pike County.”The Alabama State Council on the Arts is the official state arts agency of Alabama. The staff of the Council, directed by Al Head, administers the grants program and provides technical assistance in arts planning and programming. The Council receives its support through an annual appropriation from the Alabama Legislature and funding from the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency. Published 3:00 am Thursday, September 18, 2014 Email the author You Might Like Program educates parents about Common Core Speakers Gabriel Smith, Lisa Harris and Luca Bocci prepare to speak at the Stand in the Gap event Tuesday. (Messenger… read more Lawrence Bowden, president of the Brundidge Historical Society, said much of the credit for the arts programs offered through the BHS goes to ASCA.“Fourteen years ago, we went to ASCA seeking funding for a folk life play on the drawing board,” he said. “We had dream and a building with a hole for a floor. ASCA awarded the BHS $2,500 and that was a big vote of confidence for us. The fall season of “Come Home, It’s Suppertime” will close out our 13th year.”Bowden said ASCA funding was seed money for the annual Pike Piddlers Storytelling Festival, which is in its ninth year and other storytelling events performance including the Chili County Christmas storytelling concert. Book Nook to reopen Print Article The Penny Hoarder Issues “Urgent” Alert: 6 Companies… By The Penny Hoarderlast_img read more

Manotas, Dynamo earn 1-1 draw with Real Salt Lake

first_img Tags: Houston Dynamo/Mauro Manotas/MLS/Real Salt Lake FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailHOUSTON (AP) — Mauro Manotas tied it in the 62nd minute and the Houston Dynamo held on for a 1-1 draw against Real Salt Lake in the season opener for both teams on Saturday. Manotas cut in front of defender Nedum Onuohato to connect to Adam Lundkvist’s wide cross with a leaping right-footed stab. Matias Vera was sent off in the 81st minute, receiving his second yellow card of the match for unsporting behavior. Written bycenter_img March 2, 2019 /Sports News – Local Manotas, Dynamo earn 1-1 draw with Real Salt Lake Albert Rusnak opened the scoring in the 40th minute after his effective first touch on Corey Baird’s pass allowed him to slip behind the defender and slot it home. Associated Presslast_img read more