Boakai Wants TRC Recommendations Implemented

first_imgVice President Joseph N. Boakai says the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s (TRC) recommendations need to be implemented in order to resolve problems facing the country.The Commission came into being as a result of the Comprehensive Accra Peace Accor (CPA) that put an end to the 14 years civil conflict in Liberia.In 2010, the TRC concluded its operations and made several recommendations to the national government. Some of the recommendations included, “banning the few Liberians responsible for insecurity in the country for 30 years from holding public office, establishing an Independent National Human Rights Commission and conducting palava hut discussions across the country to resolve political, social and ethnic differences.”In an exclusive interview with Daily Observer recently in Monrovia, the Vice President indicated that recommendations from the Commission should be dealt with in order to promote stability.Though he failed to name which among the recommendations should be implemented and how, the Deputy President was quick to mention, “recommendations of the document that would reconcile the country should be implemented.”Political commentators have said that if the recommendation calling for banning Liberians who took part in the destroying of the country should be implemented as stated by the TRC’s Commissioners, than most officials holding top posts, including President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, would be affected.However, the Vice President noted that as Liberia modelled its TRC from the South African government’s version, it is important that portion of the document which speaks of embracing every Liberian and creating an environment to forget the past that divided Liberians must be of significant interest.The Vice President maintained that there are several of the recommendations already being considered for implementation by government.“The problem here is that, the war in Liberia was such that after a certain amount of time you couldn’t tell who did what and for what reason,” he maintained.Ambassador Boakai used the medium to caution Liberians about the document, stressing; “the TRC’s recommendations are something that we consider carefully.” He wants the report to serve as a primary tool in reconciling Liberians rather than further dividing them.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

WOW! THAT THUNDER SNOW STORM CLOUD IN ALL ITS GLORY

first_imgTHIS was the colour of the sky over Lough Foyle earlier.It’s called a ‘thunder snow cloud’ according to BBCNI weatherman Barra Best.And it settled in the sky – straddling counties Donegal and Derry – not long after a blue lightning storm erupted. The picture was taken well after dusk – so that blue you see is a the electric-charged lightning, not blue sky.Pic Owen Anderson WOW! THAT THUNDER SNOW STORM CLOUD IN ALL ITS GLORY was last modified: January 14th, 2015 by John2Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:cloudDerrydonegallightningsnowlast_img read more

Kerr sees a much steadier Jordan Bell ready to embrace a bigger role

first_imgOAKLAND — Jordan Bell knows there is a chance to play a bigger part with the Warriors this season, and the second-year power forward is embracing that.“I’m definitely ready for a bigger role,” said Bell, the former Oregon star, who elaborated on that topic with our Logan Murdock recently. “I think the work I put in this summer will shine during the season.”While the Warriors wait for All-Star DeMarcus Cousins to get healthy, Bell will be one of three players given the chance to compete for …last_img read more

Marijuana legalization petition rejected

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The Ohio Attorney General’s Office rejected the petition for a proposed amendment to the Ohio Constitution to legalize marijuana in Ohio.On April 9, the Ohio Attorney General’s Office received a written petition to amend the Ohio Constitution, titled the “Marijuana Rights and Regulations Amendment” from the attorney representing the petitioning committee. The summary was rejected for several reasons, including:The summary language giving the General Assembly authority to regulate “marijuana commerce” does not accurately reflect the actual amendment language.The summary omits references in the amendment that “Marijuana businesses shall be lawful only in those voting precincts in which the majority of the voters approved this section.”The summary omits references in the amendment that “The General Assembly shall within 240 days after the effective date enact and enable laws, rules, and regulations consistent with this section.”“For these reasons, I am unable to certify the summary as a fair and truthful statement of the proposed amendment,” Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine stated in his letter rejecting the petition. “However, I must caution that this letter is not intended to represent an exhaustive list of all defects in the submitted summary.”In order for a constitutional amendment to proceed, an initial petition containing summary language of the amendment and 1,000 signatures from Ohio registered voters must be submitted to the Ohio Attorney General. Once the summary language and initial signatures are certified, the Ohio Ballot Board would determine if the amendment contains a single issue or multiple issues. The petitioners must then collect signatures for each issue from registered voters in each of 44 of Ohio’s 88 counties, equal to 5% of the total vote cast in the county for the office of governor at the last gubernatorial election. Total signatures collected statewide must also equal 10% of the total vote cast for the office of governor at the last gubernatorial election.last_img read more

Onondaga Nation man starring on Saskatoon lacrosse team

first_imgTamara Pimental APTN National NewsLacrosse fans in Saskatchewan have been waiting months for their new team – the Saskatchewan Rush – to play their first home opener in Saskatoon.And there are hopes for Friday’s game after the Rush won their season opener against Calgary.On the team is Jeremy Thompson from the small Onondaga Nation in New York, a place with a strong cultural connection to the game.It’s not just a game, it’s medicine says Thompson.last_img

New Cenovus Energy CEO says he will fix balance sheet and regain

first_imgCALGARY – The new CEO of Cenovus Energy Inc. (TSX:CVE) says he will focus on paying down debt through asset sales as he works to regain the trust of investors.Alex Pourbaix, 52, says he wants to ensure the Calgary-based company produces oil and gas that’s cost competitive with any other region of the world to ensure ongoing profitability.The lawyer who retired last spring as chief operating officer of pipeline company TransCanada Corp. (TSX:TRP) says supporting new energy pipelines to ensure growing market access remains a priority for him in the new role he began last week.Cenovus shares have tumbled by more than 20 per cent since the company announced in March it had agreed to buy out its Houston-based oilsands partner, ConocoPhillips, for $17.7 billion.The move was criticized by analysts who said Cenovus lacked the experience to operate ConocoPhillips’ northern Alberta and B.C. Deep Basin conventional assets included in the deal but Pourbaix says time will prove it was an astute move.Cenovus has struck deals to sell four major asset packages for a total of $3.7 billion to help pay for the purchase. Pourbaix says his priority is to close those transactions and sell an additional package of non-core Deep Basin assets.“(The) number one urgent priority is to get the divestitures done … to get the debt leverage in this company down to an acceptable and sustainable level,” Pourbaix said.“From the perspective of the board, they were looking for someone who was going to have a great passion for continuing to drive efficiencies in this organization, driving accountability and driving shareholder returns. Those are my priorities.”last_img read more

Divisive Minnesota mine wins permits but faces challenges

first_imgMINNEAPOLIS – Minnesota regulators on Thursday granted key permits to the long-planned PolyMet copper-mining project that’s opposed by environmentalists who fear it could someday foul waters, including Lake Superior.The state Department of Natural Resources issued permits to PolyMet Mining Inc. for the company’s proposed NorthMet project in northeastern Minnesota. The project still needs permits from other agencies, and likely faces court challenges.“No project in the history of Minnesota has been more thoroughly evaluated,” DNR Commissioner Tom Landwehr said in announcing approval of permits for the project, first proposed in 2004.Environmentalists have opposed the mine for fear it could pollute pristine waters and destroy habitat for grey wolves and Canada lynx. The project would be located near tributaries feeding the St. Louis River, 175 river miles upstream from Lake Superior.Duluth for Clean Water said the proposed mine “would create permanent, toxic pollution in the headwaters of Lake Superior, putting our communities and lives in constant danger.”“The massive open-pit mine would destroy huge swaths of the Superior National Forest and significantly increase annual CO2 emissions in Minnesota at the worst possible time,” the group said.PolyMet contends it can operate the proposed mine near Hoyt Lakes and Babbitt without harming the environment while creating hundreds of badly needed jobs on Minnesota’s Iron Range.“We look forward to building and operating a modern mine and developing the materials that sustain and enhance our modern world,” PolyMet President and CEO Jon Cherry said in a news release. “Responsibly developing these strategic minerals in compliance with these permits while protecting Minnesota’s natural resources is our top priority as we move forward.”Paula Maccabee, an attorney for environmental group WaterLegacy, said environmentalists will likely appeal if permits are granted, or they could request that the DNR reconsider its decision.The agency issued a permit to mine, six water appropriation permits, two dam safety permits, a public waters work permit and an endangered species takings permit for the project. The permit to mine includes a financial assurance plan — designed to provide enough money so the DNR can reclaim and close the mine and plant site in case PolyMet does not — and a wetland replacement plan. The project still requires water and air quality permits from the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency and a wetlands permit from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.Landwehr said the DNR is “confident that the project can be built, operated, and reclaimed in compliance with Minnesota’s rigorous environmental standards.”“Yes, there will be an environmental impact,” Landwehr told reporters. “Our job is to ensure those environmental impacts are within state standards, and whenever required, they are mitigated.”Maccabee and other environmentalists questioned why the DNR did not conduct a contested case hearing for an independent review before issuing the permits. But Landwehr said the project did not meet the standards under state law for such a trial-like hearing.“These permits should be reviewed by an independent administrative law judge to establish the facts before permit decisions are made,” Kathryn Hoffman, chief executive of the Minnesota Center for Environmental Advocacy, said in a statement, noting that such hearings are routine for pipelines and power plants. “It is special treatment for PolyMet to skip this vital step for the first copper-nickel mine to apply for permits in Minnesota.”Minnesota Republican legislative leaders hailed the DNR’s decision.“This new mine will create many good-paying jobs in Northeastern Minnesota and provide a real boost to the state’s economy,” House Speaker Kurt Daudt, a Republican from Crown, said in a statement.The project would cost an estimated $945 million to construct. PolyMet said site preparation and rehabilitation of the former LTV Steel plant for a copper-nickel processing plant will continue through the winter and early spring. The company said the bulk of work is expected to start in the 2019 construction season and last about 24 to 30 months.___Follow Jeff Baenen on Twitter at https://twitter.com/jeffbaenen .last_img read more

CBSE: 5 social science chapters dropped from class 10 syllabus

first_imgNew Delhi: The Central Board of Secondary Education (CBSE) has decided to drop five social science chapters from class 10 syllabus from this academic session, according to the new curriculum.The dropped chapters, including three on political studies and two on environment, will only be part of internal assessment, but not the final board exam. The chapters are — Challenges to Democracy, Democracy and Diversity, Political Struggles and Movements, Forest and Wildlife and Water Resources. “The chapter will be assessed in the periodic tests, but will not be evaluated in the board examination,” the brief attached with the syllabus sent to schools read. The board had last month issued a circular to schools, saying it wanted to align its assessment patterns with future needs as the Ministry of Human Resource Development has decided to participate in the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) in 2021. “Countrywide consultations were held with CBSE stakeholders, including teachers, students, heads of institutions and experts in the field to suggest ways to strengthen the assessment and evaluation practices of the board,” the circular read. “It was agreed upon that the school-based or internal assessment needs to be strengthened by incorporating more diverse strategies,” it added.last_img read more

Samsung still has time to correct its foldable dream

first_imgNew Delhi: Just when the industry through innovation in the smartphone business had hit stagnation, Samsung wowed us with its first foldable device “Galaxy Fold,” worth a whopping $2,000. A super-premium phone that took almost a decade in the making and opens like a book when unfolded, shouted everything next-generation. However, the expectations took a beating when reports of the Galaxy Fold issues surfaced. The units given to international tech reviewers encountered display distortion and screen flickering issues, forcing the South Korean giant to postpone its launch in Hong Kong and Shanghai on April 23 and 24 respectively, and issue a recall of review units. Also Read – Swiggy now in 500 Indian cities, targets 100 more this year The big question lingers: Will the “Foldgate” make a dent in Samsung’s image like the Galaxy Note 7 with exploding batteries did in 2016? According to CyberMedia Research (CMR), the smartphone major has been mature and pragmatic enough by postponing its launch and sorting out all the issues before its general availiability. “All said, for Samsung, there is no race for first past the post with its foldable smartphone. It is more imperative for the company to focus on not delivering a flawed product, but rather ensuring highest consumer experience when the device goes on sales,” Prabhu Ram, Head, Industry Intelligence Group (IIG), CMR, told IANS. Also Read – New HP Pavilion x360 notebook with in-built Alexa in India Defending its devices just days before its roll-out, a Samsung spokesperson assured that the firm would “thoroughly inspect” the units. According to market research firm Gartner, foldable phones would make up 5 per cent of high-end phones sales by 2023 with around 30 million units. According to Faisal Kawoosa, Founder and Principal Analyst of market research firm techARC, from a technology-rich company like Samsung, “one would expect things out only after reliability of desired levels are achieved”. The Galaxy Fold is expected to be priced around Rs 1,40,790 in India. “Nevertheless, the lab and real-world conditions play differently. I don’t see it as a big issue as the product has not exchanged hands with consumers yet. They have time to correct this aberration,” Kawoosa told IANS. Some units of the Galaxy Fold, which became the first phone with a foldable OLED display, is encountering two primary issues: the foldable screen seems to have a layer of protective layer that is similar to a cheap screen film. Several units reportedly failed after the layer was taken off. Few other screens failed because the hinge exposed areas which allowed debris to get inside of the display, thus, damaging the unit. “We expect that users will use a foldable phone as they do their regular smartphone, picking it up hundreds of times a day, unfolding it sporadically and typing on its plastic screen, which may scratch quickly depending on the way it folds,” Roberta Cozza, Research Director at Gartner had earlier said. However, according to market research firm techARC, this is primarily a material issue than a design. “I think till the time it’s a plastic-based screen, the chances of such mishaps remain high. I would certainly like to see a glass display, that too from credible makers like Corning, to have a reliable foldable screen,” stressed Kawoosa. Moreover, there’s no denying that the second-generation of foldable devices would be better that the experimental and ambitious first generation iterations. “The first generation of an innovation is always experimental, and which over successive iterations achieves perfection. Let’s’face it. The Galaxy Fold was just a mistake in timing. It does not take away anything from its manufacturing capabilities,” Ram noted.last_img read more

Egypt sentences 12 pro-Morsi protesters to 17 years

first_imgCAIRO – An Egyptian court sentenced 12 supporters of deposed Islamist president Mohamed Morsi to 17 years in prison on Wednesday for taking part in a violent protest, state media reported.The official MENA news agency reported the protesters were convicted of attacking the headquarters of the Islamic Al-Azhar institution during the protest.The men were arrested after protesters in October tried to storm Al-Azhar’s offices, which supported the military’s overthrow of Morsi. More than 1,000 people, most of them Morsi’s supporters, have been killed in clashes with police since his ouster in July.Thousands have been arrested, with many going to trial.Morsi himself is on trial for alleged involvement in the killings of opposition protesters outside his palace.last_img read more