Agile for a Reason

first_imgOver the last year or so, I’ve had the opportunity to speak to a variety of groups and organizations. The focus has been on just ‘how’ we, at EMC, have piloted, rolled out, refined and ultimately embraced the concept of Agile Marketing.The questions frequently revolve around: How did you do it? What steps did you take? What did you encounter? What should my company do to adopt Agile Marketing?While I can answer those questions without much hesitation, it became clear to me that the real reason others have these questions is because they are struggling with the WHY. Why did we embark down this path?My short answer is always the same: It wasn’t just for fun!The push towards Agile, specifically in a marketing world, is not a function of simply trying something new or different for the sake of changing things up. If you have been in the mix, you already know the crush to produce materials, programs, activities and content is overwhelming. So the thought of change for the sake of change holds no water.Instead, it was really a question of understanding the new realities of the world around us and recognizing our core business challenges. It’s about a business environment where change is constant, but more importantly, the documented rate of change is off the charts. It’s about a way of life that has us all struggling with the amount of information that inundates our brains and our psyches every minute of every day.It’s about individuals attempting to understand the methods, modes and best practices while trying to keep up with a never-ending list of to-dos and requests. It’s about hard working managers trying to prioritize an ever- increasing amount of requests and demands. It’s about go-getters spending endless hours figuring out who to go to, at what point in time, and with what information in hand in order to successfully get their job done.THESE are the reasons for bringing Agile concepts to the marketing world. It’s really a case of adapt and change or be prepared to flounder, possibly sink or just embrace gridlock.We chose to ‘change’. A word and concept that does not always elicit cheers and excitement…change can be difficult. Any or all of us can claim to embrace change, and for some it’s easier than others, but it always presents a set of challenges no matter who you are.While our brains crave rhythm and consistency (in order to make room for all that new information) we sometimes have to force change upon ourselves. Many times, it boils down to short-term pain for the brain as a path to long-term gains.In this case it’s painful in the short term to rework our methodologies, but hugely valuable in the long run to improve the quality of our outputs. And that is exactly what we are doing in order to manage the lightning fast changes in our world and the overflow of information and requests we all face every day.For more insight into the ‘why Agile’ question and how EMC moved towards (and continually adapts) an agile marketing methodology, download our e-Book Agile Marketing: When Clear and Simple Processes Drive Innovation. It is now also available at both the Apple App Store and Google Play.last_img read more

AUDIO: Arsenal – Chelsea clash analyzed on JoySports/BBC two way series

first_imgThe BBC’s Lee James joined Joy Sports George Addo Jnr on this week’s edition of the Joy Sports/BBC two way series. The conversation this week was mainly about the big game this weekend between defending champions Chelsea and league leaders Arsenal.Other interesting fixtures to look forward to this weekend are Manchester United at home against Southampton, Crystal Palace up against Tottenham and Leicester City at home to Stoke City.Click link to listen to this week’s conversation.last_img read more

Lindsey Vonn wins bronze in final race of storied career

first_imgBut the American was competitive in her final race and briefly led after going third on a shortened course, posting a time of one minute and 2.23 seconds despite a slow start.The 34-year-old, who boasts a record 82 World Cup wins, survived the challenge of Olympic downhill champion Sofia Goggia but saw Stuhec go 0.49 seconds quicker. Lindsey Vonn brought the curtain down on her career with a bronze medal in the ladies’ downhill at the FIS Alpine World Ski Championships on Sunday, as Ilka Stuhec defended her title in Are.Vonn — the most successful female ski racer of all time — is retiring after injuries made competing too hard on her body, something that was not helped by a big crash in the super-G earlier in the week. IT’S OFFICIAL‼️Legend @lindseyvonn ends her storied career with a fairytale ending, landing on the podium in THIRD.WOW! @Are2019 #are2019 pic.twitter.com/GjFUjfFAUK— U.S. Ski & Snowboard Team (@usskiteam) February 10, 2019Current World Cup leader Nicole Schmidhofer failed to trouble the top three and Corinne Suter — bronze medalist in the super-G — was the only other contender to better Vonn’s time.Vonn becomes the oldest woman to win a World Championships medal and is also the first female athlete to win a medal at six editions of the competition.Stuhec, meanwhile, is the first woman to successfully defend the title since Maria Walliser did so in 1989.last_img read more