Homes with drone landing pads to hit the market within five years

first_imgDrone operator Tony Gilbert said drone delivery was an idea well worth exploring. IMAGE: Claudia BaxterFor drone operator Tony Gilbert, who specialises in aerial mapping for engineers, surveyors, developers, building designers and other commercial organisations, the future or drone delivery is not a joke.More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus13 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market13 hours ago“I think it’s a really great use of the technology, a logical use of the technology,” Mr Gilbert said.“Anywhere where you can reduce the cost of ordinary everyday product by using technology, it’s well worthwhile exploring.” While it may sound like the plot of a Ken Saunders book, it could in fact become a reality in just a few years.In Saunders’ book 2028, there are no longer postal delivery by postmen/women. Instead, drones deliver the mail and provide surveillance for ASIO.Saunders said he wrote the first draft of his “comedy” novel 2028 in 2015.“It wasn’t so much an attempt to predict the future, but more to describe a world where some of the not very good ideas around today have developed in slightly preposterous ways that sort of make sense, almost.”Saunders put pen to paper in a comical way, but builder Rivergum Homes design director John Eckert said the reality was that drone landing pads would become a viable option for new houses in the not-to-distant future. Tony Gilbert uses drones for aerial mapping. IMAGE: Claudia BaxterA Queensland builder has predicted a new wave of home designs incorporating drone landing pads could hit the property market in as little as three years. MORE: Cattle baron’s fun house for rent Printing a house to live in RELATED:center_img A year-long trial backed by Google, Project Wing, wrapped up in the ACT a fortnight ago; now the company has set its sights on launching the world’s first commercial delivery drone operation in urban Canberra before June.Civil Aviation Safety Authority corporate communications manager Peter Gibson said the trial to deliver fast-food from unmanned aircraft in Bonython was the only one like it in the world.“Google decided to come all the way from the West Coast of the US about two years ago,” Mr Gibson said.“They said under Australia’s rules a lot of the regulatory issues they would have faced in America were already solved because we had a set of clear rules of what they could and couldn’t do.”He said when it came to drone deliveries becoming mainstream, the world was still in trial and developmental stage.“Particularly getting the unmanned traffic systems right so the drones can fly safely and navigate their way around without running into obstacles or themselves,” he said.“If you’re a homeowner, it’s not something you could envisage using in the medium to near future, but in the long term it’s highly likely yes.”Mr Gibson said the landing pads could have more practical applications, such as a portable structure to land a drone after a shark patrol on the South Coast of New South Wales he witnessed.“Local council had paid a company to move up and down it’s beaches to do shark patrols and he had a little piece of metal on the sand with ‘H; on it, like helicopter and he put traffic cones in a circle 30m out so it would keep people away,” he said.Mr Eckert said as drone delivery systems continued to be tested and explored, it was hard to put an exact date on when it will be integrated into day-to-day lives.“But it’s certainly something that Rivergum Homes will be prepared for when the time comes, whether that be three or five years down the track.” No I think it’s really is a great use of the technology anywhere you can reduce the cost of ordinary everyday product.Mainly we are assisting surveying and engineers survey principals across large area — time consuming and intensive we allow use those across large areas for roads and new developments. The key to surviving your kids on their wildest days An artists’ impression of Rivergum Homes’ future drone landing pads to be incorporated into Queensland homes.“When I think of how online shopping has evolved in the last decade, it’s easy to see how this will affect the design of our homes to allow for a superior delivery experience,” he said.“Looking to the future, drones would certainly offer a unique way of maximising roof space with the inclusion of landing pads integrated onto the roof or into backyard designs to meet the advances in lifestyles.” >>FOLLOW EMILY BLACK ON FACEBOOK<<last_img read more

William E. (Bill) Holzer, 88

first_imgHis children announce the passing of William E. (Bill) Holzer, born in the St. Magdalene community near New Marion on January 24, 1930 the son of Clem and Josephine Kieffer Holzer. He passed away June 23rd in Yuma, Arizona after a lengthy and brave battle with cancer.Bill is preceded in death by wives Lois (Kelley) Holzer and Betty (Stickelman) Holzer. He’s survived by his children: Terry Guernsey & Karen Lally, Jerry & Carolyn Guernsey, William Anthony (Tony) & Candy Holzer, Robert & Peggy Holzer, Donna Holzer Durbin & Steve Durbin, David & Donna Holzer and Steve Holzer, as well as Betty’s daughters Patricia Morrow and Johnetta Huesman. His surviving siblings are sister Mary (Holzer) Roll and brother William Anthony (Tony) Holzer. Additionally, he is survived by a total of 15 grandchildren, 25 great-grandchildren and one great-great grandchild.Bill served proudly in the Korean War. He was a civilian gunner for the United States Army at Jefferson Proving Ground in Madison, Indiana, before transferring to Yuma Proving Ground at Yuma, Arizona in December 1972. He worked there until his retirement in 1990. Bill was a member of the Knights of Columbus and the American Legion. He attended both St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Church and later, St. John Neumann Parish in the Foothills.According to his wishes, on Saturday, June 30 there will be a viewing at Stratton-Karsteter Funeral Home in Versailles beginning at 9am followed by Rosary services at 10:20am. Mass of Christian Burial will be held on Saturday at 11am at St. John’s Catholic Church in Osgood. Bill will be cremated and his remains buried beside his wife, Lois. Friends are welcome to join his family in a graveside service at Saint Magdalene Catholic Cemetery in Madison on Tuesday, July 3rd at 10am. Military graveside rites will be conducted by the Versailles American Legion. In lieu of flowers, his children ask that donations be made in his name to the American Cancer Society or the St. Magdalene Cemetery in care of the funeral home.last_img read more

SLOT MACHINE: After being moved around early in his career, Ervin Philips finally has turned into a star as a slot receiver

first_img Published on August 30, 2017 at 12:34 am Contact Tomer: [email protected] | @tomer_langer,Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment. AdvertisementThis is placeholder textIt was a flashback to what happened frequently last year, and what will likely happen even more often when the season begins Sept. 1 against Central Connecticut State.Philips wasn’t consistently in the slot his first two seasons. He was nearly everywhere else. He arrived as a running back, the position he started at when he was at West Haven (Connecticut) High School. He also contributed as a kick returner, and assumed the role of the primary “hybrid” under then-offensive coordinator Tim Lester in 2015.In head coach Dino Babers’ up-tempo offense, he found a home at inside receiver, a place where he feels confident in his abilities as a playmaker. His 90 catches last season would have been the most ever for an SU receiver if not for the 94 grabbed by teammate Amba Etta-Tawo. With Etta-Tawo gone, Philips is poised to be one of Dungey’s top weapons.“I want to be the best receiver in the ACC,” Philips said.Even though he lined up primarily in the backfield at West Haven, the goal was to get him the ball in space. It’s why his high school coach Ed McCarthy ran jet sweeps with him and instructed his quarterbacks to throw him the ball in the flat. Philips set school records in touchdowns (88) and total offense (6,182 yards).When Philips was in high school, McCarthy watched many Mid-American Conference games, because they were frequently broadcast during the week. Unintentionally, it familiarized him with the Bowling Green offense run by Babers.“I almost knew that he would be the slot receiver (when Babers was hired at SU),” McCarthy said. “He’s made for that position really. I thought it was a perfect fit with him in the offense.”Babers said that during his first practice at SU, he and his staff instructed players to line up at whatever spot on the field they wanted to play at. Philips stood with the wide receivers.Wide receiver Steve Ishmael predicted Philips would excel if given the chance at receiver. They have been roommates for three years and now are the two senior wideouts who will be tasked with leading the offense. They spoke about this season as soon as they got back from winter break last year, Ishmael said.Philips said that earlier in his career, when he was being moved around a lot, he did not mind it. But from the first game last season, in which he set a school record with 14 receptions against Colgate, he knew he had found his permanent spot. After the breakout season he had last year, he is left wondering what might have been.“Now that I think about it,” Philips said, “I wish I had the time to really get used to one spot. When you’re at one position, you get to learn it more, you learn the ins and outs and you get to improve at that position. It’s (playing multiple roles early in his career) a blessing because it allowed me to show how versatile I can be, but at the same time I wish I could have stayed at one position.”To reach his individual goal of being the best receiver in the conference, Philips started working out at BreakOut Athlete, a local training facility that works with Division I and professional athletes.BOA has become known for its explosiveness training, director Frank Quido said, with the majority of its clients being football players who want to get faster off the line.It was initially difficult to develop a training regimen for Philips, Quido said, because he was already such a gifted athlete. But what stood out to Quido was Philips’ willingness to buy-in wholeheartedly to the training program, regardless of some of the untraditional exercises and equipment.“You know, most people when they come to my facility, this training is so much different than what they’re used to,” Quido said. “But he embraced everything I asked him to do. Never questioned why, never complained this was too hard.”The two worked together for about a month. In one drill, Philips stood behind a tackling dummy and Quido, standing on the other side, threw tennis balls both to the right and the left of the dummy. Philips stood in place, seeing where the balls were coming from and catching them to improve his hand-eye coordination.In another exercise focused on explosiveness, Philips ran on a treadmill while leaning forward until his chest touched a pole.Courtesy of Frank QuidoPhilips said he feels faster and stronger than he did a year ago. Junior Kielan Whitner has noticed it too. Whitner has played safety before for SU and is currently transitioning to linebacker. In both roles, he matches up with slot receivers in practice. This summer, in guarding Philips, Whitner said the hardest part is the bevy of moves that Philips can put on, forcing a defender to not key in on just one.“He got faster and more explosive off the line.” Quido said. “… We’re going to see him getting much more separation from defenders than we’ve ever seen before.”Philips is still learning on the job. He struggled in his shift trying to get off press coverage. He did not realize how important it was to use his hands before the throw is even made.McCarthy said, in retrospect, it’s a shame that Philips could not have redshirted his freshman season. Philips said he wishes he could have played in the slot all four years.With Etta-Tawo gone Philips recognizes that defenses might key in on him as the top target. His definition of being the best receiver in the ACC means being consistent every single game, not having a “rollercoaster” season. And even though he has been doing this for only one year, he is confident he can reach that status.“He just adjusts to things quickly,” Ishmael said. “He’s an athlete, he’s a football player and he’s been big time for us.”He proved Ishmael right a year ago. Now, to reach the postseason goals that he and Ishmael discussed, he needs to adjust to his new role. He needs to be big time.Banner photo by Jessica Sheldon Comments Ervin Philips burst off the line and went to block linebacker Shyheim Cullen. Eric Dungey took the snap and faked a pitch to running back Moe Neal who was split-out left.Syracuse’s first-string offense was scrimmaging against the second-string defense at the start of a practice inside the Ensley Athletic Center. On the first drive, the offense went three-and-out, drawing roars from the rest of the defense standing on the far sideline. To start the second drive, Dungey looked only toward his toward his speedy slot receiver. As Cullen bit on the fake pitch, Philips planted his left foot and burst right past the now flat-footed line linebacker, catching the ball thrown to the open space down the middle.last_img read more