Gritters out across Donegal as more snow forecast

first_imgDonegal County Council has dispatched gritters on main roads in Donegal this Wednesday evening as wintry showers are forecast for the north west.Snow and hail have been forecast on higher ground during another cold night tonight. Sleet is more likely at lower levels.Temperatures will drop to lows of 0 to 4C, with the lowest temperatures early in the night. “The rain will be heavy and persistent for a time and some wintry falls are likely on higher ground,” said tonight’s Met Eireann report.Thursday will be a mostly cloudy day, with showers or longer spells of rain. Highest temperatures of 6 to 8 degrees are expected.Donegal County Council gritters were out on the following routes from 6pm this evening:01: National Primary North02: National Primary Central03: National Primary South04: Inishowen South05: Inishowen East06: Inishowen West07: Milford South08: Milford North09: Cill Ulta East12: Binswilly15: Stranorlar West16: Donegal West17: Donegal North18: Donegal South19: Donegal National SecondaryBT: Buncrana Town CouncilGritters out across Donegal as more snow forecast was last modified: December 11th, 2019 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

SA business ‘to help rebuild Zim’

first_imgWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo material 7 April 2009 The South African business community was ready to start investing in Zimbabwe, Business Unity SA (Busa) president Patrice Motsepe said after a high-level meeting between a South African business delegation and the Zimbabwean government in Harare on Monday. “I have confidence that anyone who commits resources to Zimbabwe will see that the country is a good place to do business in,” said Motsepe, chairman of mining firm African Rainbow Minerals and owner of South African Premier League soccer club Mamelodi Sundowns. The 22-member Busa delegation met with President Robert Mugabe, Finance Minister Tendai Biti, and the local business community. The delegation included representatives from South Africa’s mining, retail, infrastructure, agriculture, transport, financial services and health care sectors. Busa said business leaders from Aspen Pharmacare, Massmart, Netcare, PPC Cement, Old Mutual, Price Waterhouse Coopers and the Industrial Development Corporation also participated. Motsepe expressed satisfaction at the progress being made by Zimbabwe’s new unity government in creating a conducive environment for business in the country. Zimbabwean state newspaper The Herald reports that the government, meeting at a weekend retreat at Victoria Falls, had agreed on a 100-day action plan to restore basic rights, heal political scars and boost international trust in the country. According to The Herald, the retreat was marked by a high degree of consensus between President Robert Mugabe’s Zanu-PF party and his former opposition rivals, the Movement for Democratic Change led by Prime Minister Morgan Tsvangirai. Addressing the meeting, which was sponsored by the World Bank, Tsvangirai again called on the West to “engage with us on our economic recovery programme”.SAinfo reporter and BuaNewslast_img read more

BRICS a boost to Brand South Africa

first_img13 May 2011South Africa’s ascendance to the BRICS group of major emerging economies is a boost to the country’s brand, Miller Matola, CEO of the International Marketing Council, said at an IMC roundtable discussion with London’s Financial Times on Tuesday.“One way or another this will help us achieve our country’s development objectives,” Matola said.He added that membership of BRICS – the economic alliance that includes Brazil, Russia, India and China – puts South Africa on the centre stage of global change, rather than on the sideline, he said.“This helps us as a brand. What it says to the world is, consider us a serious economic player.”The roundtable event, held at Summer Place in Johannesburg, brought together South Africa’s top business executives and politicians to examine South Africa’s role in BRICS and the opportunities membership presented to the country and the rest of the African continent.It included a panel discussion among top CEOs, some of the best brains in South African business: Maria Ramos of the Absa banking group, Jerry Vilakazi of Business Unity South Africa, Frontier Advisory’s Martyn Davies, and Benjamin Mophatlane of Business Connexion. The discussion was facilitated by Financial Times bureau chief Andrew England.Most speakers made the point that, in addition to South Africa’s strong economy and developed infrastructure, the country’s position as the gateway to the rest of Africa gave it a valuable role in BRICS.Davies made the point that the “S” in BRICS should actually stand for SADC, and not South Africa, referring to the Southern African Development Community of 15 African states, including Botswana, the DRC, Angola and Tanzania.“This partnership will not only benefit South Africa, but also the continent, as it will open up trade in Africa,” Davies said.Speaking before the discussion, Deputy International Relations and Cooperation Minister Ebrahim Ebrahim said that while South Africa does not officially represent the continent in BRICS, its membership would give Africa a stronger voice, not only within BRICS, but also across all international platforms in which the BRICS countries are individually represented.Ebrahim added that South Africa’s accession to BRICS was a natural fit.“Our positive attributes that put us in a different category include our role as a major economic player in Africa, our mineral and industrial output, our electricity generation capacity, our road, rail, ports, communication infrastructure, our sophisticated financial markets and service industries, our manufacturing capacity, our membership in the G20, and our level of industrialisation,” he said. “All these, and many more, profile us in a very positive way.”The membership was the result of two years of in-depth planning and joint efforts by the public and private sector, Ebrahim said, adding that South Africa should not underestimate its status as a deserving member of BRICS.“We agree that we do not have a major world population size in comparison to other BRICS member states, including the high-digit growth rates enjoyed by its BRICS partners,” he said.“We move from the premise that, there are attributes that fellow BRICS member-states see in us, that we choose to overlook or undermine. We also argue that, if we consistently profile ourselves as that small country on the southern tip of Africa, we will go nowhere.”First published by MediaClubSouthAfrica.com – get free high-resolution photos and professional feature articles from Brand South Africa’s media service.last_img read more

Budgeting Strategies That Work

first_imgBy Barbara O’Neill, Ph.D., CFP®, Rutgers Cooperative Extension, [email protected] budget (a.k.a., spending plan) is a plan for spending future income and expenses, including setting aside savings for future financial goals. Ideally, a budget should be written (paper, computer spreadsheet, etc.) with specific categories of income, spending, and dollar amounts. Benefits of budgeting include providing “guardrails” for spending, achieving financial goals (if savings is included), and for peace of mind. https://pixabay.com/photos/shopping-spending-till-slip-879498/ Return to article. Long Descriptionstevepb/Pixabay.com, CC0Budgets project future income and expenses with a goal of achieving positive cash flow. Therefore, developing and following a budget requires a level of attention to detail (e.g., recording and adjusting expenses). Below are four recommendations to develop a budget that works:Define Your Income– Base a budget on average monthly take-home income. Multiply weekly pay by 4.3 to get a monthly amount. This accounts for “extra” income months (e.g., months with five Friday paydays).Pay Yourself First– Ask yourself if you can live on 80% to 90% of your income with 10% to 20% of income set aside for savings goals. The 20% amount is meant for long-term savings and includes tax-deferred retirement savings plan contributions. Savings is the most difficult “expense” to budget.Set Aside Reserves– Plan ahead for occasional expenses by setting aside money monthly for them. Examples include insurance premiums, home and car maintenance, pets, and property taxes if not escrowed.Follow the “2x Gas” Rule– Set aside twice the amount that you spend monthly on gas for car maintenance and repair expenses. Drivers who buy more gas put more “wear and tear” on their car. You will not have expenses every month, but when you do, the money will be there.Food is a major recurring expense in family budgets. It may not be the largest expense (dollar wise) compared to housing costs, income and property taxes, child care, and transportation, but people still spend a lot of money buying food. Below are seven smart ways to cut food costs to get your budget numbers to balance:Make a Shopping List– List items to buy and their approximate cost before you go food shopping. Then stick to the list. Include “miscellaneous” and a dollar amount (e.g., $5) so impulse buying is built in.Use Coupons Wisely- Redeem coupons from newspapers and online platforms, but only on products that you plan to buy anyway and only when the after-coupon cost is cheaper than alternative products.Search for Bargains– Look for marked down bakery items, meat/seafood, and other supermarket “clearance” foods. If the packaging is intact, it is generally safe to buy these foods if used immediately.Double (or Triple) Your Savings– Take advantage of double or triple the savings on manufacturer’s coupons and supermarkets that allow you to combine a store coupon and a manufacturer’s coupon.Join the Club- Sign up for supermarket “shoppers’ cards” that provide access to special sales promotions and/or an opportunity to earn points toward free or reduced price food items (e.g., a free Easter ham).Stock Up to Save– Buy (or grow in a home garden) fresh fruits and vegetables when they are in season and freeze, can, or dry them for use at a later date.Cut Up Your Own Food- The more preparation that a store does (e.g., cutting up stew beef, making meat and vegetable kabobs, and slicing fruit or making fruit salads), the more consumers generally need to pay.To prepare you own personalized budget, download this Spending Plan Worksheet from Rutgers Cooperative Extension that includes spaces to list income and fixed, variable, and occasional expenses.last_img read more