Video: Praying for a holy land

first_imgVideo: Praying for a holy land An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Press Release Service Youth Minister Lorton, VA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 [Episcopal News Service] The Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem and the Middle East runs more than 30 education and healthcare institutions throughout Israel, Jordan, Syria, Lebanon and the Palestinian Territories, bringing vital services and a much-needed lifeline to the local community.The diocese and many of its institutions operate against a backdrop of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict that has lasted for more than 60 years. The Christian minority is increasingly emigrating in search of a better life and better opportunities overseas.The living stones of the holy land and the ministry of the Christian institutions encourage people from all over the world to invest in the region, but more support and advocacy is needed to ensure the Christian presence remains.The Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem has been instrumental in ministering to the needs of the community and working with its ecumenical partners towards achieving peace in the holy land. Rector Belleville, IL Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Tampa, FL Submit an Event Listing Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Bath, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Smithfield, NC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Featured Jobs & Calls Advocacy Peace & Justice, By Matthew DaviesPosted Jul 5, 2012 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Comments (1) In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Featured Events The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Virginia Gambill says: Tags Middle East, Comments are closed. Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Collierville, TN Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK July 29, 2012 at 2:30 pm Many thanks for posting this marvelous video of ongoing activities of our brothers and sisters in Christ there in that Holy Place. Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Submit a Press Release Associate Rector Columbus, GA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Israel-Palestine, Director of Music Morristown, NJ Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Video Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Knoxville, TN Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Albany, NY Curate Diocese of Nebraska Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Submit a Job Listing Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Martinsville, VA last_img read more

FUBA NBL: Warriors out for revenge against wounded Canons

first_img Tags: David DengFUBA NBLRonnie MutebiSaidi AmistopUCU CanonsWarriors Warriors lost to UCU in the first round. (PHOTOS/File)FUBA National Basketball LeagueYMCA Courts, WandegeyaFriday, 16-08-2019 -Ndejje Angels vs Sharing Youths-Warriors vs UCU CanonsWANDEGEYA – Warriors will be eyeing revenge when they take on UCU Canons in one of the two FUBA National Basketball League games to be played on Friday evening.Ronnie Mutebi’s side lost 60-62 to UCU in the first round, one of only two defeats they have suffered all season.The first-round game is one that Warriors will feel they should not have lost and Friday presents a chance to straighten the record.“Friday’s game will help us maintain the low number of losses,” said Mutebi ahead of the game.“We lost to UCU cannons in the first round so we have a score to settle.“We also have just lost terribly to city oilers so we really want to come out of this pit we have put ourselves into.”While Mutebi eyes victory, he is also worried about the threat that UCU poses going into the game.“UCU has proved to also be a title contender so we want to dominate them for us to gauge our preparedness.“We have been hit by many injuries on top of the suspension of Carmelo so the odds are tight on our side but we will go through strong.“It’s a chance for the warriors to prove to the doubters especially ourselves that this year is ours.”Warriors are one of only two sides that are still unbeaten in the second round having won all their 5 games so far. The other is Oilers who are 6-0 in terms of second-round record.For UCU Canons, they come into the game on the back of a first second-round loss of the season.Nicholas Natuhereza’s side lost 64-67 to Oilers on Wednesday night and will very much want to return to winning ways.Going into the contest, David Deng is a major doubt for Canons while Warriors are still without the suspended Saidi ‘Camelo’ Amis.UCU have the best record for the season so far, winning 15 of their 17 fixtures so far.UCU have won 15 of their first 17 games this season.For Warriors, they have won 14 in 16.The other fixture on the night will see Ndejje Angels take on Sharing Youth.After a decent run in the first round, Ndejje have struggled in the second, winning only 2 of their six games so far.For Sharing, they have so far won three and lost as many in 6 second-round games.Comments last_img read more

Kerr sees a much steadier Jordan Bell ready to embrace a bigger role

first_imgOAKLAND — Jordan Bell knows there is a chance to play a bigger part with the Warriors this season, and the second-year power forward is embracing that.“I’m definitely ready for a bigger role,” said Bell, the former Oregon star, who elaborated on that topic with our Logan Murdock recently. “I think the work I put in this summer will shine during the season.”While the Warriors wait for All-Star DeMarcus Cousins to get healthy, Bell will be one of three players given the chance to compete for …last_img read more

Steph, Ayesha Curry play Santa on Ellen DeGeneres special

first_imgWatching the reactions of children when they’re in the presence of Stephen Curry is absolutely priceless.Their eyes become saucers. Their mouths fly open. A gaze of utter disbelief comes over their faces.It happened again recently when the Golden State Warriors star and his wife, Ayesha, visited the East Oakland Boxing Association (EOBA) for a segment on the NBC holiday special, “Ellen’s Greatest Night of Giveaways.”“Is this real?!” a kid is heard asking. “Are you really Steph …last_img read more

IDC secures $50m Chinese loan

first_img20 May 2009 “We see our facility with the IDC as a milestone for our mutually beneficial relationship, and look forward to further enhancing our cooperation in the near future.” Last week, the IDC secured a €60-million (about R690.9-million) credit line from the European Investment Bank to finance viable projects by small and medium enterprises (SMEs) in the industrial, resources and services sectors. CCB-Johannesburg GM Yimin He said he believed it was important for the local CCB branch to play a support role for business in South Africa, in light of the negative impacts of the global economic downturn. “Over the past year, our units have been receiving an unprecedented amount of applications, so we have seen it fit to also go out and source funding so that we can increase our capacity to lend,” Qhena said in a statement this week. ‘Long-lasting relationship’ While this is the first facility the IDC has had with the China Construction Bank, which has a local office in Johannesburg, Qhena said it was a first step towards establishing a long-lasting relationship with the Chinese lender. “We also have an export loan book, which we believe this CCB loan will assist in recapitalising, since the demand for export funding has also increased from our front.” South Africa’s Industrial Development Corporation has received a US$50-million (about R422.2-million) loan from the China Construction Bank (CCB), which it will use to increase its general lending capacity and recapitalise its export finance book. IDC chief executive Geoffrey Qhena said demand for lending had increased tremendously due to the global economic downturn, prompting the state-owned lender to source funding from the international market. SAinfo reporterWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

Winnie’s pain and torture in prison

first_imgThe ever-glamorous Winnie Madikizela-Mandela with a copy of her new book 491 Days, Prisoner Number 1323/69.(Image: Nelson Mandela Centre of Memory) Winnie Madikizela-Mandela talks to Ahmed Kathrada at the Nelson Mandela Centre of Memory in 2008.(Image: Nelson Mandela Centre of Memory/Matthew Willman)Winnie has lost none of her style and beauty.(Image: ancarchives.org.za)MEDIA CONTACTS • Sello HatangCEO and spokespersonNelson Mandela Centre of Memory+27 11 547 5600.RELATED ARTICLES• The women in Madiba’s life• Women in the struggle remembered• Commemorating 1913 heroines• Women taking SA forwardLucille DavieWinnie Madikizela-Mandela felt particularly close to her jailed husband, Nelson, in October 1970, after she was released from serving 491 days in solitary confinement. She wrote to him on 26 October, saying: “In a way during the past two years I felt so close to you. It was the first time we were together in similar surroundings for that length of time. Eating what you were eating and sleeping on what you sleep on gave me that psychological satisfaction of being with you.”She was responding to his letter of 1 October, which read: “I had to wait for 2 weeks before I could send you my warmest congratulations for serving 491, and still emerge the lively girl you are, and in high spirits. To you and your determined friends I say welcome back! Were I at home when you returned I should have stolen a white goat from a rich man, slaughtered it and given you ivanya ne ntloya [leftover traditional beer and sour milk] to down it. Only in this way can a beggar like myself fête and honour his heroes.”Nelson was 52 years old at the time, and had served six years of his life sentence for sabotage, together with seven of his colleagues. Winnie was 36 years old, and had experienced many spells in detention, but the longest was the 491 days.When he was imprisoned on Robben Island in June 1964, her life changed radically. “The first few weeks and months after Nelson was gone, that was utter hell. Solitude, loneliness, is worse than fear – the most wretchedly painful illness the body and mind could be subjected to,” she recounts in her 1985 autobiography, Part of my Soul Went with Him.Pain and deprivationShe describes the pain and deprivation she endured during those 491 days in detention in a new book entitled 491 Days, Prisoner Number 1323/69, a record of her journal kept during the 16 months she spent in jail, as well as letters to and from herself and Nelson, and others.The journal and papers were discovered recently by Greta Soggot, the widow of David Soggot, who was one of Winnie’s advocates during the 1970 trial. Extracts may be downloaded from the Mandela Cente of Memory website.From the moment of her marriage to Mandela in 1958, Madikizela-Mandela was doomed to decades of harassment, imprisonment and torture at the hands of the apartheid security police. It started in 1958, when she was detained for her participation in a women’s anti-pass campaign.Winnie was born Nomzamo Winifred Zanyiwe Madikizela in 1934 in the Bizana district of the former Transkei, the fifth of eight children. Her parents, Columbus and Gertrude Madikizela, were both teachers. Her mother died when she was 10, and she soon took over the domestic duties – caring for her younger siblings and her father. Madikizela-Mandela attended school where her father was a history teacher. She learned Latin and English, science and maths, and she became his favourite child. In 1952, she arrived in Johannesburg to study to be a social worker, doing her training at Chris Hani Baragwanath Hospital in Soweto.ApprehensionWinnie approached the returned journal with some apprehension. She says in the epilogue: “When the pages that make up this journal were returned to me after so many years I did not want to read them. I was afraid. There are memories you keep in a part of your brain; it is part of those things that hurt so much you do not want to remember.”She, along with other anti-apartheid activists, had been detained under Section 6 of the Terrorism Act, a new act which allowed for indefinite detention and indefinite interrogation. On 12 May 1969, the police knocked on her door in Orlando West about 2am, arresting her. She took with her a bag that was always packed for just these moments. Her daughters, Zindzi and Zeni, who were just eight and 10 at the time, clung to her skirt, crying: “Mummy, mummy don’t go.”She describes the conditions in prison. “You are imprisoned in this little cell. When you stretch your hands you touch the walls. You are reduced to a nobody, a non-value. It is like killing you alive. You are alive because you breathe. You are deprived of everything – your dignity, your everything,” she writes.Extremely illDespite Winnie’s strength of mind and fierce fighting spirit, she became extremely ill during her 491-day stay in prison, the result of long months of solitary confinement and the poor diet, which often consisted of porridge with maggots in it. She suffered chest pains, palpitations, body spasms, haemorrhaging, loss of appetite and chronic weight loss.She was admitted to hospital several times. Then she decided on a new course of action. “I decided I would commit suicide but would do so gradually so that I should die of natural causes to spare Nelson and the children the pains of knowing I had taken my life,” she wrote in April 1970. “I thought there would be no better method of focusing the world attention on the terror of the Terrorism Act than this.”Her illness continued, until she was taking 12 drugs daily, but she never carried out her decision, although the feeling lingered. “I was so happy at times I fell asleep and hoped I would not get up the following day even if I had not gone as far as the hospital, I did not care anymore.”After five sleepless days and nights of continuous interrogation, she signed a confession. Finally, in October, she appeared in court with 21 others, charged under the Suppression of Communism Act and the Unlawful Organisations Act, including furthering the aims of the ANC and conspiring to commit sabotage. The charges were withdrawn, and her confession was never produced in court.But as they were leaving the court, the police again arrested the group and returned them to jail. In August, they were charged with 540 offences, which were almost identical to the previous charges. On 14 September, the charges were dropped and they were free to go. Two weeks later, Winnie was served with a five-year banning order and was placed under house arrest.She survived solitary confinement but also endured shorter spells in prison. “Solitary confinement was designed to kill you so slowly that you were long dead before you died. By the time you died, you were nobody. You had no soul anymore and a body without a soul is a corpse anyway. It is unbelievable that you survived all that,” she writes now.Banning orders, prison sentencesWinnie’s life of bannings and imprisonment started in 1962, four years after she married Nelson. She was banned and restricted to Johannesburg for two years in 1962, the same year in which Nelson was sentenced to five years in prison for leaving the country illegally and organising a mass stayaway.It went on for years: in 1965, she was banned for five years and restricted to Orlando in Soweto. In 1967, she was sentenced to 12 months in prison for failing to give her name and address to the security police. In 1971, she was sentenced to 12 months in prison for communicating with a banned person in her house. The conviction was set aside on appeal, but in 1972 she was again sentenced for having visitors at her house. Again the sentence was set aside on appeal.In 1973, she was sentenced to 12 months suspended for three years for having lunch with her children in a vehicle in the presence of a banned person. The sentence was reduced on appeal to six months, which she served at Kroonstad prison. In 1976, she was detained without trial for four months after the June 16 Soweto uprising, in which marching schoolchildren were fired upon by the police, and some 500 died across the country on the day.In 1977, her banning order was renewed for five years – in 13 years, she lived for only 10 months without a banning order.BrandfortThen, in May 1997, in a devastating move, she was banished to Brandfort, a tiny town in Free State province, some 200 kilometres from Johannesburg, with her 16-year-old daughter, Zinzi. She lived in a small box house, with “no running water, no electricity, and the house had no floors or ceilings. The town was hostile, and the people spoke mainly Sotho, Tswana or Afrikaans, and hardly any Xhosa, which was Winnie’s home language,” says Sheila Meintjies in a 1998 report, Winnie Madikizela Mandela: Tragic figure? Populist tribune? Township tough?But Winnie wasn’t daunted. Carrying a bucket of cold water back to the three-roomed house, she showed she still had style. “She might have looked despondent, but it didn’t show. Instead she looked superb, wearing a smart skirt and jersey, a fashionable pair of boots, and a silk hat on her head,” recounts Emma Gilbey in The Lady, The Life and Times of Winnie Mandela, published in 1994.She opened a clinic and a crèche, and initiated feeding schemes for the young children of Brandfort, where she lived for nine years.Return to SowetoBut she defiantly returned to Soweto in 1986, where she formed the Mandela United Football Club – the members, in effect, were her personal bodyguards. In 1991, she was charged and convicted for the assault and abduction of 15-year-old activist Stompie Seipei. She received a six-year sentence which was reduced to a fine of R15 000 and a suspended sentence.Perhaps she herself offers an explanation of what went wrong: “Throughout the years of oppression, I think my feelings got blunted because you were so tortured that the pain reached a threshold where you could not feel pain anymore. If you keep pounding and pounding on the same spot the feeling dies, the nerves die,” she writes in 491 Days.Today, Winnie Madikizela-Mandela continues her political service to the ANC – she serves on the National Executive Committee – and she is a member of parliament.last_img read more

South Africa’s SuperTeachers use tech to enhance education

first_img16 September 2015Tinny Molepo is a primary school teacher at Mothibedi Combined School in Limpopo and is SuperTeacher of the Year 2015, for her work using technology tools such as Skype to enhance the communication skills of her learners.Join us in congratulating the ISPA Super Teacher of the Year 2015 Tinny Molepo of Mothibedi Combined School. Read about this ongoing event and other winners here: http://ow.ly/SePVTPosted by CoZa Cares on Tuesday, September 15, 2015The SuperTeacher honour is awarded by the Internet Service Provider Association of South Africa (Ispa), as a way to reward and recognise teachers who use technology effectively to aid education. The competition, held annually since 2001, is acknowledged as the foremost ICT/education award in the country. Education is one of the pillars of the National Development Plan Vision 2030.“My passion is helping others live up to their potential and I have realised that technology can play a big role in helping all of us fulfil our life goals,” Molepo said, adding that technology tools had the potential to be a major influence on education in South Africa. “It is very important for donors and sponsors to be able to see how their materials are helping learners and educators in real ways every day.”Molepo was joined by Ispa TechTeacher of the Year, Matthew Hains of Woodlands International College, and Ispa ChampTeacher of the Year, Mabore Lekalakala of Toronto Primary in Limpopo.And here are the #superteachers2015 ready for a fantastic evening pic.twitter.com/Abn3AaVsTd— Matthew Hains (@TechTeachersZA) Septembe r 10, 2015Molepo’s competition submission, titled “Techno reading goes viral through Skype” involved teaching her learners, who are in grades 3 to 6, how to use ICT skills to boost reading and writing. The children also learned online communication skills by using Skype to communicate in real time. Part of the project, Molepo said, involved the children communicating via Skype with the American philanthropist who had donated books to their school.MEC for western cape at #superteachers2015 pic.twitter.com/UQzRtiFVbm— Maggie Verster (@maggiev) September 10, 2015The awards were handed out in Stellenbosch on 11 September. The keynote speaker, Western Cape MEC for education Debbie Schafer, congratulated Molepo and the other winners not only on their achievements, but also for the hard work they put into guiding youth through their education. “We place great value in awards like this,” Schafer said. “The provincial education department is trying to create an entirely different ethos that is centred on IT in education, and (we) acknowledge the kind of creativity that we have seen here tonight.”Fiona Wallace, Ispa’s chief executive and the representative of CoZa Cares Foundation, called Molepo and the other winners true heroes of education. “The three winners demonstrated that technology alone doesn’t produce winners – their perseverance and creativity helped power them right over the finish line.”The CoZa Cares Foundation advocates ICT in education. Its educational efforts include digital content curation and delivery for open education resources using its innovative Nolwazi OER repository. The non-governmental organisation also co- ordinates teacher development through its ICT in Education capacity-building division, as well as monitoring and evaluation via mobile auditing tools.Each year, Ispa funds the ICT training managed by CoZa Cares Foundation for teachers from under-resourced South African schools. Since the inception of the programme, training has been provided to over 4 000 teachers.Prizes for the competition’s three winners include trophies, sponsored attendance at a national education conference in 2016 and, for their schools, an ES500 BenQ projector and an eBean classroom tool to help to continue the good work.Source: News24WireSAinfo reporterlast_img read more