Saints v QPR player ratings

first_imgSee also:QPR beaten despite stunning Austin strikeAustin has proved himself – RedknappSandro cleared to return to trainingQPR ‘were left in the lurch’ by Remy moveQPR left in the lurch by Remy move – HarryHow have QPR’s summer signings fared and are they likely to improve?Redknapp: I didn’t try to sign West Ham manMidfielder Fer ‘will be a top player for QPR’Redknapp backs Phillips to succeed at QPRQPR boss dismisses Taarabt exit rumoursQPR assess duo ahead of West Ham gameMidfield woes have affected Rio – RedknappRedknapp: No regrets over Simpson moveFollow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Remembering Lundi, South African gospel star, 1979-2017

first_imgGospel singer Lundi Tyamara has died at the age of 38. Fans, friends and family have paid tribute to one of South Africa’s most popular singers.Lundi Tyamara was one of the biggest selling gospel artists in South Africa, selling over 3 million albums. Tyamara died, aged 38, on 27 January 2017. (Image: Gallo Music)CD AndersonLundi Tyamara’s former producer, Tshepo Nzimande, described the singer in an interview with eNCA news channel as a “go-getter”. Tyamara died at Edenvale Hospital in the early hours of 27 January 2017, following a battle with TB.“Lundi put up a gallant fight against his illness, but God’s will prevailed. We ask that his fans, supporters and followers join us in celebrating his life,” said Anele Hlazo, a family friend.Tyamara had a long music career, starting out as a back-up singer for fellow gospel singer Rebecca Malope when he was still a teenager.He released his debut album Mphefumlo Wami in 1998. It was an instant success, selling almost 400,000 copies. Over the course of his career Tyamara released more than 20 albums and won numerous South African Music and Kora All Africa Music awards.Nzimande said that Tyamara had a God-given talent, with a powerful stage presence that found audiences with both young and old. Despite some controversy during his career, including drug and money problems, returning to music and his faith always gave him his greatest pleasure.Tyamara was aware of the second chance he had at rebuilding his music career over the last few years. In an interview with Entertainment Online website in 2016, he said: “I’m lucky. It’s not easy after all the bad things I have done like the drugs and the alcohol. But my fans still love me. That shows that God has sent me to do this.”Commenting briefly to eNCA on his passing, Malope said she was in shock but would always have fond and special memories of Tyamara.Among the many messages, Arts and Culture Minister Nathi Mthethwa extended his condolences to Tyamara’s family and fans.Tyamara is survived by two sisters and a brother; his mother died in 2006, followed by his stepfather shortly thereafter.Despite his many hardships, Tyamara’s story was one of great triumph and success. Following his death, he will always be remembered by his fans as a prince of South African gospel.Watch some of Lundi’s greatest hits below.Source: eNCA News and Entertainment Online.Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

How to Find Beauty in the Ordinary with Filmmaker Mathieu Provost

first_imgLets take a look at how to capture amazing footage in everyday situations with these insights from professional video producer Mathieu Provost.As filmmakers and video producers we’re often forced to shoot in less-than-ideal situations. It’s not uncommon to have to shoot in an ugly office, echo-filled room, or dark interior. But good filmmakers know how to bring out the best in every situations. Through creative camera work and a fundamental knowledge of composition you can get extraordinary shots in everyday locations.One filmmaker with a keen eye for finding beauty in everyday situations is Mathieu Provost. The Canadian filmmaker uses a combination of everyday filmmaking tools to draw out hidden beauty in seemingly everyday locations. I recently came across Mathieu’s aerial reel on Vimeo and was instantly blown away by the footage quality.In fact, one of the most impressive things about the work that Mathieu is doing is the fact that it is seemingly everyday work, yet the result is amazingly striking footage. His setups aren’t complex or expensive. I asked Mathieu a few questions about his work and he was kind enough to share his insights with us.Q&A with Mathieu ProvostWhat tools do you use to capture your amazing footage?On a shoot I always bring two cameras, different lenses, and, of course, the drone. I have the regular phantom made by DJI, but most of the time I prefer the DJI Inspire 1. More powerful, more stable, and more variety of lenses as well. On the ground, I always have my Sony a7RII with the 70-200 and 24-105. My colleague also uses the Canon lens 11-24 for really wide and cool shots on the ground with glide cam. And, of course, slider and tripod!How much of your cinematography is planned out before the day of the shoot? Before each shooting (ground and in flight) I really like to go on Google Maps to check the exact location of the shoot and the environment around. That will help me to know a few things about the area (permit needed, obstacles, etc.) Also, if we can have access to the location, I will go first by myself and take pictures of the environment, beauty shot, sun position, and everything related to the shoot. I also try to find information on the web about the location, the stories… Once I’m back home, the movies start playing in my head… Visualization for me is the key. I also produce a production plan/document with the different kind of footage I imagined, and information that I think is important on the location etc. Once we are there, it’s easier to follow this kind of bible to make sure that we covered every aspect. We are also really sensible for each little intuitive moment that can happen on a set. Sometimes, theses moments are keepers for sure.You’re exceptionally good at finding hidden beauty in everyday moments. How can other filmmakers develop an eye for shooting great shots in everyday situations?Life is full of small moments that we can immortalize with our camera. I think that each person has their own way to see the world and be amazed by little things. That’s how the images will show on a film. I had this gift in my life to find everything nice around me. I always look everywhere in case that I found the perfect amount of light, the perfect amount of wind, etc… For me, each situation, each moment, each flower, each river deserves to be on film with their beauty. The only thing I can say is just look around you. I don’t think we can learn how to be sensible for things. Challenge yourself by creating a nice video with small little things around you. Do you have any tips for someone looking to shoot awesome drone footage?The more you shoot, the more comfortable you will be when flying your drone. You need to know your drone by heart. You need to know your limit and your drone’s limit as well. Play with the sunset and sunrise, play with trees, with textures, rivers, etc… And the most important, fly your drone smoothly and slowly on any shots. For me, smooth and slow is the key… Bring your viewers somewhere else.If they take time to watch your video, give them at least a free ride, a free flight with emotions. Take your time to shoot. You never know if you will have the chance to come back where you are and in the same light situation etc. Sometimes I use the entire battery lifetime on filming only one shot! So almost 20 minutes! I want to have the perfect shot for me, for my eyes, for the vision I have at that perfect moment. Also, try to film different points of view to do variety into your shot. I also really like to include ground shots with drone shots.How do you determine your color palette when grading?I usually don’t use a lot of color correction in post. I really like natural colors and clean images. I play a lot with the natural effect of light, golden hour, etc. Contrast and saturation sometimes, but most of my video doesn’t have any color correction… Or almost.What role does music play in telling your videos story?For me, the most important thing in cinema is the choice of the music. This will drive all your images, the feeling you want to demonstrate, and, of course, the sensibility. Sometimes I can spend hours searching for music. All that time spent will make the difference at the end. Before filming, I was a music composer for TV commercials, short films, and other commercial stuff.In my time off, I was always playing with World War footage. I was trying to reproduce different kinds of music on the same footage (classical and heavy metal) to show people the important place that music can have in a film. When you have a chance, try this test at home. You will find that combining World War footage and classical music is almost artistic.What resources/websites/courses have helped you the most as a filmmaker?Our X generation is really lucky to have all the internet options/access to learn from everywhere and from everybody in the world. I really take advantage of this every time I can. I think that everybody needs to learn from different tutorials, at least the basic rules of film and/or photo. YouTube and Vimeo have been great friends for me, of course!When we want to buy new equipment, we check all reviews before to make sure we have the best possible gear for our need, etc.  I also spent a lot of time with really good cinematographers that share the same vision that I have… I learned bags of information with these people, for sure. Don’t be shy about asking questions. When you have your answer, work on it, try to find information on it, try different ways to practice, etc. Practice makes perfect, there is no doubt! This sentence will help you to understand more the vision I have about filmmaking… I read this quote a few years ago: “Work until your idols become your rivals.”What is the most important lesson you’ve learned as a filmmaker?All filmmakers have their own way to learn. For me, learning from people, experience, and technique and, of course, practice was the key. Be curious. If you have questions, ask people or go find by yourself what you looking for on YouTube, Vimeo or other platform available to you. Also, be patient… There are thousands of filmmakers all around the world who produce fantastic footage…But one day, somebody will knock at your door to tell you that your work is also fantastic… That was my case a few days ago with the PremiumBeat team. So everything is possible. Be respectful for the talent you have in life… This is a gift. You need to feed it with passion.Where can people go if they want see more of your work?Subscribe to our Vimeo and YouTube, follow us on Twitter and Facebook channel. We’d be happy to answer any questions you have! Have any questions for Mathieu? Share in the comments below.last_img read more

Why You Should Master the Under-Appreciated Art of a Good Pre-Edit

first_imgLooking to streamline your workflow? Here’s everything you should do to prepare your footage before you edit.Cover image via Shutterstock.For those looking to improve their video production workflow, there are plenty of resources online with actual production tips for pragmatic filmmaking. There are also lots of resources for editing effectively, including plenty of tips, tricks, and pointers.However, what you do between the stages of a project can be just as important. Let’s explore the under-appreciated art of the pre-edit and how it can streamline your work across the board.Upload from FootageImage via Shutterstock.Once you’ve wrapped production, you stow your cards and head to your edit space. Your first step is going to be getting your footage off your cards and onto your computer. This process  is pretty straightforward, but it varies based on card (or drive) type.SD Cards: these are standard for most DSLR and prosumer cameras, and most Macs and PCs have SD card slots these days. If not, you’ll need to get a card reader that connects via USB.CF Cards: another industry standard for many cameras, CF card slots are not usually built in to most computers, so a card reader (preferably one with multiple and different ports) is a must.Solid State Drives: for many higher-end cameras that record RAW footage, SD and CF cards are simply not large or fast enough to write what you recorded. Solid state drives (which can be quite expensive) operate as independent hard drives.Create and Organize FoldersImage via Shutterstock.If you haven’t already, it’s important to establish a system for organizing your footage and assets. Besides, footage, you’ll often find yourself with a mix additional assets and files to organize. You should organize everything from audio tracks to GFX to important documents in the same master folder (especially for backing up — see below).Here are some resources to keep your projects and files organized.Keeping Your Video Editing Projects Organized5 Tips to Organize and Customize Premiere Pro6 Easy Steps for Logging FootageBack Up as Soon as PossibleImage via Shutterstock.After you upload your footage to your organized folders, you’ll need to back everything up as soon as possible — either on your computer or an external hard drive. (Here are some recommended external hard drives to store your backups.)Editing Software and SyncOnly after you have safely stored and organized your footage should you bring it into your NLE. Here are some tutorials for uploading footage to Adobe Premiere Pro or Final Cut X.Adobe Premiere ProFinal Cut Pro XOnce you have your footage in your editing software, you can start your review process. I’d personally recommend going through all your footage and either using a colored marking system or pulling clips into different timelines or bins.If you’re working with separate audio and video files, you can sync manually or use programs like Pluraleyes to create new timelines with your preferred audio.Save Your Pre-Edit and BeginOnly after you’ve successfully uploaded, organized, backed up, and synced would I consider a pre-edit finished. You can even save your pre-edit as its own project file so you have it to go back to or transfer over to someone else later.In some organizations, junior editors handle pre-edits before senior editors take over. If you’re working solo, it can be helpful to keep that mindset to get all everything perfectly lined up before you dive in.last_img read more

Nike Football launches The Last Game: The stars or the clones?

first_imgIt has already got more than 4 million page views in slightly under 24 hours on YouTubeIt’s not even been one day since it was posted on YouTube and it has already got more than 4 million page views in slightly under 24 hours.Nike, known for its quirky football focussed adverts, has come out with another brilliant advert titled Nike Football: The Last Game.The five-minute advert has the star players of the football world Cristiano Ronaldo, Wayne Rooney, Neymar Junior, Zlatan Ibrahimovic, Andres Iniesta, David Luiz, Franck Ribery, Tim Howard and Ronaldo Fenomeno are battling it out with the ‘perfect’ clones.A story about risky football versus safe football, the advert shows how scientists and clones want to prove that riskless football is more effective while Ronaldo Fenomeno and the original players disagree, and are willing to risk everything to prove the scientist wrong.The advert shows you how risking everything is the only way to make this sport so awesome.There is only one way to know who is right: the Last Game.So who wins? The star players or the clones?last_img read more

Mohammedan Sporting honours former star

first_imgKolkata, Jun 16 (PTI) The executive committee of Mohammedan Sporting club has unanimously decided to confer the prestigious Shan-e-Mohammedan on former India footballer Latifuddin Najam at its Iftar Party on June 23. The Shan-e-Mohammedan is the Lifetime Achievement Award of Mohammedan Sporting club, which is awarded annually to players for their contribution to football. Latifuddin, son of 1952 Helsinki Olympian Syed Khaja Moinuddin, was a useful winger who could play on both flanks. “When I started playing I just wanted to be like my father. He was my idol, he always used to tell me whatever you do in your life do with honesty. I think I have him proud along the way.” Latifuddin said. “I played the game for passion and never think of any awards but today I felt honoured to recieve this award from a club which is closest to my heart.” he added. Latifuddin began his career at Andhra Pradesh Police team before moving to Kolkata in 1970 with Mohammedan Sporting. Having spent a couple of seasons at Mohammedan Sporting, Latifuddin switched allegiance to East Bengal in 1972. However, he returned to Mohammedan Sporting the very next year and stayed till 1980. During his second spell with Mohammedan Sporting, he formed a lethal strike force with the likes of Mohammed Habib, Mir Sajjad and Mohammed Akbar, which helped the Black Panthers win many accolades in 70s. In 1981, Latifuddin again joined East Bengal before returning to Mohammedan Sporting for one last time in his career in 1982. Latifuddin bacame the top scorer in 1976 Calcutta Football League with 22 goals, a feat that has been achieved by 11 other Mohammedan Sporting footballers only since the inception of Calcutta Football League in 1898. The Hyderabadi has also enjoyed a lot of success in his international career. He was a prominent member of the India junior team that were joint winners of the 1974 AFC U-19 Championship in Thailand, which was known as Asian Junior Championship then. Latifuddin scored a goal in the final which ended in a 2 -2 draw against Iran and both teams were declared as joint winners. He was also a part of the senior India team in the 1974 Mardeka Cup, where he scored against Indonesia in a match which India lost in tie-breaker. PTI TAP AH AHadvertisementlast_img read more