Fortuna football rallies to claim 49-20 win over McKinleyville in Big 5 opener

first_imgMcKINLEYVILLE >> Once the Huskies were able to find their footing, the results quickly followed.Just as it did in the Milk Can Game win over Ferndale, the Fortuna High School football team used a strong second-half showing to eliminate an early 14-point deficit to claim a 49-20 win over McKinleyville in the Big 5 opener for both schools on Friday night.After falling behind 14-0 less than four minutes into the game, Fortuna went on to score 42 unanswered and 49 of the next 55 points to take …last_img read more

Amari Cooper starts fast, but Cowboys fade in loss to Tennessee

first_imgFor complete Oakland … CLICK HERE if you are having a problem viewing the photos on a mobile deviceALAMEDA — The NFL isn’t playing the 2018 season specifically to humiliate the Raiders.Sometimes it just seems that way.Amari Cooper, in his first game with the Dallas Cowboys, wasted no time in making his presence felt Monday night before a national television audience with a 4-yard touchdown reception from Dak Prescott for the first touchdown of the game against the Tennessee Titans.last_img read more

Winnie’s pain and torture in prison

first_imgThe ever-glamorous Winnie Madikizela-Mandela with a copy of her new book 491 Days, Prisoner Number 1323/69.(Image: Nelson Mandela Centre of Memory) Winnie Madikizela-Mandela talks to Ahmed Kathrada at the Nelson Mandela Centre of Memory in 2008.(Image: Nelson Mandela Centre of Memory/Matthew Willman)Winnie has lost none of her style and beauty.(Image: ancarchives.org.za)MEDIA CONTACTS • Sello HatangCEO and spokespersonNelson Mandela Centre of Memory+27 11 547 5600.RELATED ARTICLES• The women in Madiba’s life• Women in the struggle remembered• Commemorating 1913 heroines• Women taking SA forwardLucille DavieWinnie Madikizela-Mandela felt particularly close to her jailed husband, Nelson, in October 1970, after she was released from serving 491 days in solitary confinement. She wrote to him on 26 October, saying: “In a way during the past two years I felt so close to you. It was the first time we were together in similar surroundings for that length of time. Eating what you were eating and sleeping on what you sleep on gave me that psychological satisfaction of being with you.”She was responding to his letter of 1 October, which read: “I had to wait for 2 weeks before I could send you my warmest congratulations for serving 491, and still emerge the lively girl you are, and in high spirits. To you and your determined friends I say welcome back! Were I at home when you returned I should have stolen a white goat from a rich man, slaughtered it and given you ivanya ne ntloya [leftover traditional beer and sour milk] to down it. Only in this way can a beggar like myself fête and honour his heroes.”Nelson was 52 years old at the time, and had served six years of his life sentence for sabotage, together with seven of his colleagues. Winnie was 36 years old, and had experienced many spells in detention, but the longest was the 491 days.When he was imprisoned on Robben Island in June 1964, her life changed radically. “The first few weeks and months after Nelson was gone, that was utter hell. Solitude, loneliness, is worse than fear – the most wretchedly painful illness the body and mind could be subjected to,” she recounts in her 1985 autobiography, Part of my Soul Went with Him.Pain and deprivationShe describes the pain and deprivation she endured during those 491 days in detention in a new book entitled 491 Days, Prisoner Number 1323/69, a record of her journal kept during the 16 months she spent in jail, as well as letters to and from herself and Nelson, and others.The journal and papers were discovered recently by Greta Soggot, the widow of David Soggot, who was one of Winnie’s advocates during the 1970 trial. Extracts may be downloaded from the Mandela Cente of Memory website.From the moment of her marriage to Mandela in 1958, Madikizela-Mandela was doomed to decades of harassment, imprisonment and torture at the hands of the apartheid security police. It started in 1958, when she was detained for her participation in a women’s anti-pass campaign.Winnie was born Nomzamo Winifred Zanyiwe Madikizela in 1934 in the Bizana district of the former Transkei, the fifth of eight children. Her parents, Columbus and Gertrude Madikizela, were both teachers. Her mother died when she was 10, and she soon took over the domestic duties – caring for her younger siblings and her father. Madikizela-Mandela attended school where her father was a history teacher. She learned Latin and English, science and maths, and she became his favourite child. In 1952, she arrived in Johannesburg to study to be a social worker, doing her training at Chris Hani Baragwanath Hospital in Soweto.ApprehensionWinnie approached the returned journal with some apprehension. She says in the epilogue: “When the pages that make up this journal were returned to me after so many years I did not want to read them. I was afraid. There are memories you keep in a part of your brain; it is part of those things that hurt so much you do not want to remember.”She, along with other anti-apartheid activists, had been detained under Section 6 of the Terrorism Act, a new act which allowed for indefinite detention and indefinite interrogation. On 12 May 1969, the police knocked on her door in Orlando West about 2am, arresting her. She took with her a bag that was always packed for just these moments. Her daughters, Zindzi and Zeni, who were just eight and 10 at the time, clung to her skirt, crying: “Mummy, mummy don’t go.”She describes the conditions in prison. “You are imprisoned in this little cell. When you stretch your hands you touch the walls. You are reduced to a nobody, a non-value. It is like killing you alive. You are alive because you breathe. You are deprived of everything – your dignity, your everything,” she writes.Extremely illDespite Winnie’s strength of mind and fierce fighting spirit, she became extremely ill during her 491-day stay in prison, the result of long months of solitary confinement and the poor diet, which often consisted of porridge with maggots in it. She suffered chest pains, palpitations, body spasms, haemorrhaging, loss of appetite and chronic weight loss.She was admitted to hospital several times. Then she decided on a new course of action. “I decided I would commit suicide but would do so gradually so that I should die of natural causes to spare Nelson and the children the pains of knowing I had taken my life,” she wrote in April 1970. “I thought there would be no better method of focusing the world attention on the terror of the Terrorism Act than this.”Her illness continued, until she was taking 12 drugs daily, but she never carried out her decision, although the feeling lingered. “I was so happy at times I fell asleep and hoped I would not get up the following day even if I had not gone as far as the hospital, I did not care anymore.”After five sleepless days and nights of continuous interrogation, she signed a confession. Finally, in October, she appeared in court with 21 others, charged under the Suppression of Communism Act and the Unlawful Organisations Act, including furthering the aims of the ANC and conspiring to commit sabotage. The charges were withdrawn, and her confession was never produced in court.But as they were leaving the court, the police again arrested the group and returned them to jail. In August, they were charged with 540 offences, which were almost identical to the previous charges. On 14 September, the charges were dropped and they were free to go. Two weeks later, Winnie was served with a five-year banning order and was placed under house arrest.She survived solitary confinement but also endured shorter spells in prison. “Solitary confinement was designed to kill you so slowly that you were long dead before you died. By the time you died, you were nobody. You had no soul anymore and a body without a soul is a corpse anyway. It is unbelievable that you survived all that,” she writes now.Banning orders, prison sentencesWinnie’s life of bannings and imprisonment started in 1962, four years after she married Nelson. She was banned and restricted to Johannesburg for two years in 1962, the same year in which Nelson was sentenced to five years in prison for leaving the country illegally and organising a mass stayaway.It went on for years: in 1965, she was banned for five years and restricted to Orlando in Soweto. In 1967, she was sentenced to 12 months in prison for failing to give her name and address to the security police. In 1971, she was sentenced to 12 months in prison for communicating with a banned person in her house. The conviction was set aside on appeal, but in 1972 she was again sentenced for having visitors at her house. Again the sentence was set aside on appeal.In 1973, she was sentenced to 12 months suspended for three years for having lunch with her children in a vehicle in the presence of a banned person. The sentence was reduced on appeal to six months, which she served at Kroonstad prison. In 1976, she was detained without trial for four months after the June 16 Soweto uprising, in which marching schoolchildren were fired upon by the police, and some 500 died across the country on the day.In 1977, her banning order was renewed for five years – in 13 years, she lived for only 10 months without a banning order.BrandfortThen, in May 1997, in a devastating move, she was banished to Brandfort, a tiny town in Free State province, some 200 kilometres from Johannesburg, with her 16-year-old daughter, Zinzi. She lived in a small box house, with “no running water, no electricity, and the house had no floors or ceilings. The town was hostile, and the people spoke mainly Sotho, Tswana or Afrikaans, and hardly any Xhosa, which was Winnie’s home language,” says Sheila Meintjies in a 1998 report, Winnie Madikizela Mandela: Tragic figure? Populist tribune? Township tough?But Winnie wasn’t daunted. Carrying a bucket of cold water back to the three-roomed house, she showed she still had style. “She might have looked despondent, but it didn’t show. Instead she looked superb, wearing a smart skirt and jersey, a fashionable pair of boots, and a silk hat on her head,” recounts Emma Gilbey in The Lady, The Life and Times of Winnie Mandela, published in 1994.She opened a clinic and a crèche, and initiated feeding schemes for the young children of Brandfort, where she lived for nine years.Return to SowetoBut she defiantly returned to Soweto in 1986, where she formed the Mandela United Football Club – the members, in effect, were her personal bodyguards. In 1991, she was charged and convicted for the assault and abduction of 15-year-old activist Stompie Seipei. She received a six-year sentence which was reduced to a fine of R15 000 and a suspended sentence.Perhaps she herself offers an explanation of what went wrong: “Throughout the years of oppression, I think my feelings got blunted because you were so tortured that the pain reached a threshold where you could not feel pain anymore. If you keep pounding and pounding on the same spot the feeling dies, the nerves die,” she writes in 491 Days.Today, Winnie Madikizela-Mandela continues her political service to the ANC – she serves on the National Executive Committee – and she is a member of parliament.last_img read more

The keys to high yields in 2015

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Some corn and soybean yields in Ohio did well better than others, but what was the differentiating factors? Was it planting date? Tillage? Traits? DuPont Pioneer Field Agronomist Kyle Poling goes over corn and soybean performance for 2015 in this week’s DuPont Pioneer Field Report.last_img

Here’s What Stripe, Stealth Payment Startup Backed by PayPal Founders, Will Do

first_img8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Tags:#news#web Related Posts A large number of entrepreneurs and investors are betting that the Internet is going to disrupt financial services just like it’s disrupted so many other industries. Stripe is one of those, it’s a stealthy startup aimed to make online payments super simple. It’s being built by three Irishmen in Silicon Valley and has reportedly amassed a few million dollars in funding before it’s even launched, from some of the very top investors in technology including from Paypal founders Peter Thiel and Elon Musk.Michael Arrington got the scoop tonight, posting details on the funding of a company known about by a just few observers; Reuters financial blogger Felix Salmon already followed the company on Twitter, for example, but has said before that he prefers to let other people report scoops first and then try to provide superior analysis later. This is a company we’ll be hearing a whole lot about in the future. According to Arrington, Stripe has raised money from PayPal founders Peter Thiel and Elon Musk, Google and YouTube backers Sequoia Capital, the super-hot Andreesen Horowitz and Ron Conway’s fund SV Angel. (The $2m that TechCrunch reports was invested seems surprisingly small for a crowd like that.) What makes Stripe different? It’s going to focus on data portability.Little is publicly known about Stripe so far, but here’s what we’ve heard from a source deep inside Google.Stripe will enable any developer to add payment and billing functionality to their own application with a JSON API that can be connected to in 5 minutes, with no branding requirements or directing users to the Stripe site. It will strive to be transparent and contemporary.The price? “An all-inclusive commission of 5%, and a per transaction fee of $0.30.” Though none of the founders originated in the US, due to the complexity of an arguably antiquated financial system, they say they will be limited at first to payments between US parties. Founders Patrick Collison, John Collison and Darragh Buckley appear to be focused on providing a nice, clean, developer-centric payment platform that they and their investors think could take on the world.What’s Most Interesting About StripeWhat’s most interesting about the company is its philosophy:The founders of Stripe feel very strongly about data portability. We’ll try to keep you with us by offering a better product than all of our competitors, but we won’t keep you by locking you in. If you want to leave us for somebody else, we’ll help you migrate your credit card data in a secure and PCI-compliant way. We’re programmers at heart, and we strongly believe in open systems and a level playing field.That sounds great. Given the pedigree of this startup’s investors, it will likely join pre-launched developer-centric banking startup Banksimple on a short list of high-profile efforts to shake up the future of finance from the bottom up.center_img Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… marshall kirkpatricklast_img read more

Manny doing just fine

first_imgPH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games PLAY LIST 02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss “Broner was pressing his left glove on Manny and it rubbed on his eyes,” said best friend and chief trainer Fernandez in Filipino.Pacquiao also wore dark eyeglasses during the post-fight press conference.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSUrgent reply from Philippine ‍football chiefSPORTSWin or don’t eat: the Philippines’ poverty-driven, world-beating pool starsThat triggered rumors that Pacquiao suffered a serious eye injury, like a detached retina which ended the career of Hall of Famer Sugar Ray Leonard in the 1980s.‘Be careful’ Grace Poe files bill to protect govt teachers from malicious accusations Oil plant explodes in Pampanga town Buboy: Face Floyd, then quit International media reported that Pacquiao’s injury was caused by a devastating 1-2 punch from Broner.Website www.nydailynews.com stated that “according to a member of Pacquiao’s camp who requested anonymity, the 40-year-old welterweight champ stayed up all night after the Broner bout playing chess, but complained of pain and vision loss in his left eye on Sunday morning.  ‘He told me it was like covering one eye with his hand,’ the source said.”Another camp member agreed with Fernandez, telling the Daily News that the injury was relatively minor, a corneal scratch from the tape on one of Broner’s gloves—an injury Pacquiao has suffered in previous fights.Yet another website, www.talksport.com, even suggested that Pacquiao may have to retire because of the injury.“Everything seemed fine following the win on Saturday night, but Pacquiao woke up in great distress Sunday morning,” wrote talksport.com.Pac-May 2Observers also feared that no Pacquiao-Floyd Mayweather Jr. rematch would happen if indeed the Filipino’s eye is damaged.Three years ago, the two fought in the “Fight of the Century” and  Pacquiao wants to avenge his loss.He immediately challenged the unbeaten five-weight world champion Mayweather, 41, to a rematch after beating Broner.The retired Mayweather was at ringside in Las Vegas. Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. (From left) Justin Fortune, Buboy Fernandez and Freddie Roach attend to Manny Pacquiao after the WBA welterweight champion’s match against Adrien Broner on Saturday in Las Vegas. Pacquiao’s camp assures the fighting senator’s left eye will heal in three days. —WENDELL ALINEA/MP PROMOTIONSHOLLYWOOD—Buboy Fernandez allayed fears about Manny Pacquiao’s left eye that was grazed by Adrien Broner’s glove during their WBA welterweight title bout in Las Vegas on Saturday night (Sunday, Philippine time).Fernandez said doctors have checked on Pacquiao after the eight-division champion complained of pain and partial loss of vision soon after he defeated Broner to keep his WBA belt at MGM Grand Arena.ADVERTISEMENT Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting ‘We are too hospitable,’ says Sotto amid SEA Games woes In the post-fight press conference, Pacquiao was repeatedly asked about the rematch.“If [Mayweather] goes back to the ring and wants to challenge me, I’m a champion. Get back to the ring and we will fight again if he wants.  If he wants to come out of retirement, then announce it and challenge me. I’m a champion and I don’t pick any opponent,” said Pacquiao. —WITH A REPORT FROM CNN.COMSports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next SEA Games hosting troubles anger Duterte MOST READ Oil plant explodes in Pampanga town US judge bars Trump’s health insurance rule for immigrants LATEST STORIES View comments Lacson backs proposal to elect president and vice president in tandem “I saw Broner doing that (long stance with right hand loaded up) because he was trying to launch that [Juan Manuel] Marquez punch on Manny,” said Fernandez.  “Totally he (Broner) abandoned his jabs.”That was when Fernandez warned Pacquiao to be cautious of Broner.Fernandez said doctors ordered Pacquiao to rest his eyes for three days.“The important thing is that our champion is safe,” added Fernandez.Conflicting reportsADVERTISEMENTlast_img read more

Stewart Could Face Criminal Charge

first_imgTony Stewart could still face criminal charges for running down Kevin Ward Jr. with his sprint car, even if the three-time NASCAR champion didn’t mean to kill Ward, hurt him or even scare him.Ontario County Sheriff Philip Povero, who announced on Aug. 12 that the investigation is continuing, has said that his initial findings have turned up nothing that would indicate criminal intent in the crash at the Canandaigua Motorsports Park.But legal experts agree that does not mean Stewart is in the clear.The NASCAR star could be charged with second-degree manslaughter under New York law if prosecutors believe he “recklessly caused the death of another person,” with negligent homicide another possibility, according to criminal law professor Corey Rayburn Yung of the Kansas University School of Law.“The question over whether someone was reckless is a factual one, and one a prosecutor might let a jury decide,” said Yung, who also posts at the Concurring Opinion blog.Athletes in competition often do things that would get the average person arrested — think two boxers in the ring, or a baserunner sliding into second with his spikes high.But sometimes an act is so far outside the bounds of accepted sporting behavior that it becomes a crime, as former major leaguer Jose Offerman learned when he was charged with felony assault for rushing the mound — swinging a bat — after he was hit by a pitch in a minor league game.So Stewart would not expect to be charged for the car-on-car bump that sent Ward spinning into the wall. But if, for example, he were to tell police that he saw Ward on the track and tried to shower him with dirt or otherwise send him a message, a first-degree manslaughter charge could be a possibility, Yung said.In a 1949 case that Yung uses in his class, midget car racer Joseph Sostilio was found guilty of manslaughter after he tried to squeeze a four foot-wide vehicle through a two-foot opening at 40 mph, crashing into another car and sending it into the one driven by Stephen D. Bishop. Bishop’s car flipped three times and he was killed.Sostilio’s conviction was upheld on appeal by the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court. Noting that a violent or aggressive act on a football field or in a boxing ring is not necessarily a crime, Justice Henry Tilton Lummus wrote: “In the present case physical contact was not an essential part of the racing of automobiles.”That was a half-century ago, and racing has changed. Trading paint is a part of the sport, and it’s not even uncommon these days for racers to leave their cars to confront rivals after a crash, which Ward appeared to be doing when he was killed.“In sports we tend to allow all sorts of conduct we’d never allow in another circumstance,” Yung said. “But this isn’t a collision. It’s not in that ballpark; it’s something you don’t expect. This is a more complicated scenario. We’re assuming Stewart didn’t mean to do this, and yet a death resulted.”Whether Stewart’s actions were part of racing depends on what the police investigation finds. Unlike the cars Stewart drives on the NASCAR circuit, the sprint cars have no radios or instrument data recorders that could tell authorities exactly what was happening when Stewart hit Ward.Povero would not say how Stewart described the accident, but he said he has reviewed two videos and spoken to Stewart.“The worst thing that could happen for Stewart is if his story doesn’t seem to match other evidence,” Yung said. “Because then it might call into question his own story.”Povero’s previous comments that he found no criminal intent all but rules out the possibility of a first-degree murder charge, which would essentially require a confession that Stewart was trying to kill Ward.For second-degree murder, prosecutors would need to prove Stewart was reckless in combination with a “depraved indifference to human life.”“Mr. Stewart has fully cooperated with the police officers that are investigating,” Povero said in a news conference shortly after the race. “He was visibly shaken by this incident, and has promised his continuing cooperation in this investigation.”After the investigation is completed, Povero said, the evidence will be turned over to the district attorney as a matter of routine. Even if he is cleared by prosecutors, though, Stewart could face a civil suit.Although the standard of proof is lower than in a criminal case, the civil court would also consider Ward’s state of mind at the time of the accident and whether he was also negligent in venturing into racing traffic on a dark track in a dark suit.But Stewart would also have to weigh the damage to his image and career — with his own team, tracks and millions in endorsements — making a quick settlement likely.___By Jimmy Golen, AP Sports Writer. AP Auto Racing Writer Jenna Fryer contributed to this story.TweetPinShare0 Shareslast_img read more

Ajax Beats AEK, Rejoins Champions League Elite

first_imgATHENS (AP) — Dusan Tadic scored twice in the second half Tuesday to take Ajax to the last 16 in the Champions League for the first time in 12 years with a 2-0 win over 10-man AEK Athens, in a match marred by fan violence in and around the stadium.The Serb defender scored from the penalty spot in the 68th minute after Marko Livaja received a second yellow card for handling the ball. He struck again four minutes later, tapping in an unselfish pass from substitute Klaas Jan Huntelaar.AEK had managed to keep Ajax at bay thanks to the unyielding center-back duo of Dmytro Chygrynskiy and Marios Oikonomou, but struggled after losing Livaja.AEK fell to its fifth straight loss in the competition. The host’s best chance came four minutes before the end of the match when a powerful shot on target from Lucas Boye forced an athletic save from Andre Onana.The game was preceded by violence inside Athens’ Olympic Stadium and in parts of central Athens, mostly involving Greek fans who clashed with local rivals and riot police. Moments before the match started, riot police charged into the stands to break up AEK fans who hurled flares and smoke canisters. Police reported no injuries or arrests, although images seemed to show one fiery explosion going off near a section of supporters.Smoke raises from the stand of Ajax fans after flares are thrown during a Group E Champions League soccer match between AEK Athens and Ajax at the Olympic Stadium in Athens, Tuesday, Nov. 27, 2018. (AP Photo/Thanassis Stavrakis)Four-time European champion Ajax returned to the Champions League group stage this season for the first time in four years. The team’s 19-year-old captain, Matthijs de Ligt, was only 6 the last time Ajax made it out of the group stage.“That was so long ago, so it’s really tremendous for this to be happening again,” he said. “We were happy to make it to the Champions League, but sometimes we surprise ourselves and exceed our own expectations.”The center-back said Ajax is now hoping to overtake Bayern Munich at the top of Group E.“It would be great for us to come out of the winter break in the top spot,” he said. “Now that’s what we will fight for.”—By DEREK GATOPOULOS , Associated PressAjax’s Matthijs de Ligt flies in the air after a challenge with AEK’s Alef during a Group E Champions League soccer match between AEK Athens and Ajax at the Olympic Stadium in Athens, Tuesday, Nov. 27, 2018. (AP Photo/Thanassis Stavrakis)Ajax’s Matthijs de Ligt flies in the air after a challenge with AEK’s Alef during a Group E Champions League soccer match between AEK Athens and Ajax at the Olympic Stadium in Athens, Tuesday, Nov. 27, 2018. (AP Photo/Thanassis Stavrakis)Ajax goalkeeper Andre Onana saves an attempt on goal by AEK’s Ezequiel Ponce, on the ground, during a Group E Champions League soccer match between AEK Athens and Ajax at the Olympic Stadium in Athens, Tuesday, Nov. 27, 2018. (AP Photo/Thanassis Stavrakis)A fan throws a flare towards Ajax supporters during a Group E Champions League soccer match between AEK Athens and Ajax at the Olympic Stadium in Athens, Tuesday, Nov. 27, 2018. (AP Photo/Thanassis Stavrakis)Ajax’s Dusan Tadic celebrates his goal gainst AEK during a Group E Champions League soccer match between AEK Athens and Ajax at the Olympic Stadium in Athens, Tuesday, Nov. 27, 2018. (AP Photo/Petros Giannakouris)TweetPinShare0 Shareslast_img read more

BC Indigenous group anticipating RCMP action at antiLNG pipeline camp

first_imgSupporters of an Indigenous camp blocking access to a planned pipeline in northern British Columbia say they are anticipating RCMP action over an injunction filed against them.Jennifer Wickham, a member of the Gidimt’en clan of the Wet’suwet’en First Nation, says police have gathered in Smithers, B.C., and Houston, B.C., which are the closest towns to the Gidimt’en checkpoint.TransCanada has said it has signed agreements with all First Nations along the pipeline route to LNG Canada’s $40 billion liquefied natural gas project in Kitimat, B.C.But Wickham says the company does not have the authority to build through Wet’suwet’en territory because the house chiefs, who are hereditary chiefs rather than elected band council leaders, have not given consent.On Dec. 14, the Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs issued a statement saying they were deeply concerned by the National Energy Board’s decision denying their request to participate in a jurisdictional challenge to the permits issued to TransCanada’s Coastal GasLink pipeline project, which would cross Wet’suwet’en territories.The RCMP and TransCanada did not immediately respond to a request for comment.The Canadian Presslast_img read more