Qantas and Viva Cruises into new waters

first_imgVicky, Qantas Holidays, Karen, Elite Travel & Louisa, Qantas Holidays Helen, Cathay Pacific, Ross, Viva! Holidays, Nigel, Cathay Pacific & Sherilyn, Hawaiian Airlines Angela, Teresa, Maria & Michelle, Jetset Hurtsville Clare, Goway Travel, Kylie, TravelManagers, Andreas, Trendsetter Travel & Cruise Centre Qantas Holidays and Viva! Holidays unveiled new cruising partners to its agents yesterday, bringing the total number of cruise lines the wholesaler sells to a baker’s dozen. Their cruise expansion comes just shy of tomorrow’s official 2011 cruising season launch, and is tipped to be a big earner for agents yet again with competitive commissions and public demand.“Cruising is no longer for the over fed, newlywed or nearly dead,” Qantas Holidays Marketing Manager, Angie Howes joked with the group. “This is a chance to see the world from the sea,” she said. Attending agents were also eligible to earn 500 trip points, plus went in the draw to win great prizes including a Royal Caribbean International cruise. “We’ve simplified the process, and agents can now bundle bookings with airfares, hotels through either Qantas Holidays or Viva! Holidays.  We are continually looking to add new cruise product to our portfolio, and also have dedicated cruise consultants,” Ms Howes said.The entire cruise portfolio now includes, APT River Cruising, Blue Lagoon, Captain Cook Domestic, Captain Cook Fiji, Coral Princess, Royal Caribbean International, Azamara Club Cruises, Cunard Line, North Star Cruises, Orion, Princess Cruises, Star Cruises and Celebrity Cruises. Clare Collins, Goway Travel with Linh Le & Angie Howes, Qantas Holidays Sonya & Judith, Travelscene Menai Ross, Viva! Holidays & Emma, Singapore Airlines Source = e-Travel Blackboard: D.Mlast_img read more

Researchers examine use of Twitter to propagate or debunk conspiracy theories during

first_img Source:https://home.liebertpub.com/news/a-new-study-examines-use-of-twitter-to-spread-or-debunk-conspiracy-theories-during-recent-zika-virus-outbreak/2421 Reviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Sep 11 2018Researchers investigating the use of Twitter to propagate or debunk conspiracy theories related to the 2015-2016 Zika virus outbreak analyzed the content of more than 25,000 Tweets and the characteristics of the social networks used to disseminate them. The analysis showed that Tweets intended to propagate conspiracy theories were spread through a more decentralized network than debunking messages. The findings are reported in an article published in Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers.Related StoriesResearchers succeed in conquering chronic infection with hepatitis B virusNew class of molecules could someday become basis for Zika-specific therapeuticResearch sheds light on how hepatitis B virus establishes chronic infectionIn the article entitled “Propagating and Debunking Conspiracy Theories on Twitter During the 2015-2016 Zika Virus Outbreak,” author Michael J. Wood, PhD, University of Winchester, U.K. concluded that, in comparison with debunking messages, using Twitter to propagate conspiracy theories was more likely to involve the use of rhetorical questions and a greater number of claims with explicit references to authorities. In this way, the study established that conspiracy theories can be considered a form of rumor and can be analyzed based on rumor theory.”Though conspiracy theories are nothing new, the advent of social media has created a conduit for more rapid spread of these rumors,” says Editor-in-Chief Brenda K. Wiederhold, PhD, MBA, BCB, BCN, Interactive Media Institute, San Diego, California and Virtual Reality Medical Institute, Brussels, Belgium. “Public health agencies can help alleviate anxiety and fear in the population by using these same channels to provide more accurate and reassuring messages.”last_img read more