Fur Fest planning continues

first_img Fur Fest planning continues Skip Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson Those who are interested in volunteering for the Pike Animal Shelter Fur Fest on Nov. 1, are invited and encouraged to attend the Wednesday night meeting. Book Nook to reopen Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits New for the Second Annual Pike Animal Shelter Fur Fest will be the Canine Academy hands-on obedience classes, giant inflatables and retrieving retrievers.Fundraising awards will be presented and sponsors will be recognized.“We will also have music and dance entertainment provided by SheBANG! Championship Clog Dance Company and by the Troy School of Dance and the Arts,” Schubert said. “Bonnie Blue Barbecue will provide food.” The Pike Animal Shelter Fur Fest is just around the corner and shelter volunteers and friends will meet at 6 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 15 at the Troy Recreation Center to make final plans for the event on Nov. 1.Donna Schubert, Founder’s Society chair, said the Pike Animal Shelter Fur Fest is a pets-welcome, family oriented community event that celebrates companion animals and the effort to build the Pike Animal Shelter.“The Second Annual Pike Animal Shelter Fur Fest will bring back the highlights of the first event,” Schubert said. “Again, the Fur Fest will feature professional pet photos, a pet parade and contest, microchipping, drug dog demonstration, blessing of the animals, beauties and beasts (presentation of pageant winners), dogs available for adoption and bone mountain.” Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day Published 10:00 pm Monday, October 13, 2008 You Might Like Proposed lodging tax draws mixed views Most of the Pike County Commission candidates are undecided on a proposal to implement a county lodging tax on hotels…. read more All proceeds from the Shelter Fur Fest will benefit the construction of the Pike Animal Shelter on the Henderson Highway.“Volunteers are invited to help with many of our special events,” said Susan Green, shelter volunteer. “We will need ticket sellers and takers, dog handlers, parking assistants and others for various reasons. This is a great way to get involved with the Shelter activities. We’ll be sure that everyone gets a chance to enjoy the event as well as work.” By The Penny Hoarder By Jaine Treadwell Penny Hoarder Issues “Urgent” Alert: 6 Companies Are… Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration Sponsored Content Print Article Email the author Latest Stories Around the WebMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Acid Reflux (Watch Now)Healthy LifestyleIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthGet Fortnite SkinsTCGThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancellast_img read more

Big Brother, The Full Monty & More in This Month’s London Datebook

first_img FEBRUARY 17-23 Honey Pot: A Taste of Honey introduced a young Amanda Plummer to New York City more than 30 years ago. Now, the National Theatre revives Shelagh Delaney’s contemporary classic, with Kate O’Flynn inheriting Plummer’s role as feisty teenager Jo and Lesley Sharp as her errant mother Helen; Bijan Sheibani directs. FEBRUARY 24 – MARCH 2 Let It Go: The 1997 smash hit British film The Full Monty, about six Sheffield steelworkers who turn to stripping, is back—this time not as a Broadway musical set in the U.S., but as a play by original screenplay writer Simon Beaufoy. Sidney Cole and Kenny Doughty lead director Daniel Evans’ cast into the Noel Coward Theatre, opening February 25 for a 16-week run. ALSO: Francis Beaumont’s rarely seen period caper The Knight of the Burning Pestle opens February 26 at the capital’s newest venue, the Sam Wanamaker Playhouse at Shakespeare’s Globe—expect madcap comedy by candlelight. Writer-director Peter Gill opens his new play Versailles at the Donmar February 27: Francesca Annis, Gwilym Lee, and fast-rising young actor Tom Hughes lead the cast of a play said to chime with the 100-year anniversary of the start of World War I. ALSO: Previews start February 22 at the St. James Theatre for the U.K. premiere of Urinetown, directed by Jamie Lloyd and starring Jenna Russell (Merrily We Roll Along) and Richard Fleeshman (Ghost). Last chance to catch the sellout run of Gina Gionfriddo’s feminism-themed comedy Rapture, Blister, Burn, which ends February 22 at the Hampstead Theatre; Emma Fielding and Emilia Fox play the onetime friends who swap lives—for a while, anyway. ALSO: Irish actress Lisa Dwan’s Beckett triptych, Not I, Footfalls, and Rockaby, which opened the Court’s 2014 season last month, transfers to the Duchess Theatre for two weeks beginning February 3. First full week of performances for Stroke of Luck at north London’s Park Theatre, marking the playwriting debut of former Broadway press agent, Larry Belling; Kate Golledge directs and stage and TV veteran Tim Pigott-Smith (Benefactors, The Iceman Cometh) leads the cast. FEBRUARY 10-16 Room 101: Who can forget the Ministry of Love’s most feared room in 1984, the classic novel by George Orwell? A new stage version adapted and co-created by Robert Icke and Duncan Macmillan opens February 13 at the Almeida Theatre, led by Mark Arends and Hara Yannas.center_img FEBRUARY 3-9 O Mistress Mine: Abi Morgan, who scripted Meryl Streep’s way to a third Oscar for The Iron Lady, returns to the theater with the true-life story of an American couple who formed a contract to sustain their adulterous relationship for 30 years. Danny Webb and Saskia Reeves play the mysteriously titled He and She. Vicky Featherstone directs at her home base, the Royal Court, where the show opens February 5. February brings cold weather to London, but there’s plenty brewing theatrically to stir the emotions and warm the heart. This month’s offerings range from the start of previews for a Tony-winning musical satire to a classic English novel shifted to the stage. Plus, The Full Monty—this time not as a musical, but as a play—read on! View Comments ALSO: Tony winner Debbie Shapiro Gravitte (Jerome Robbins’ Broadway) comes to the Pheasantry nightspot in Chelsea for a week of cabaret February 11 through 16. Last chance to catch Jude Law leading a testosterone-charged “band of brothers” into battle in Henry V at the Noel Coward Theatre, marking the end of the director Michael Grandage’s 15-month residency there on February 15. A former screen Henry V, Tom Hiddleston, wraps up his extended Donmar run as Coriolanus on February 13.last_img read more

Defense keys Badgers’ success

first_imgMATTHEW KUTZ/Herald photoWisconsin volleyball head coach Pete Waite couldn’t have scripted a better start to the Big Ten season for his team. After opening conference play at home with a big upset win over Minnesota, the No.8-ranked Badgers went on the road this weekend and defeated a pair of top-ranked Big Ten opponents.Wisconsin beat the No. 21-ranked Purdue Boilermakers 30-27, 31-29, 28-30, 14-30, 15-9 for the Badgers’ first Big Ten Conference road win of the season this past Friday and followed the emotional five-game victory up with a 3-0 sweep of Illinois Saturday.”I was really happy with our play this weekend at Purdue and at Illinois,” Waite said at his press conference Monday. “Going into Purdue, they’re a top-20 team and they play in a small gym with a big crowd and they’re an extremely scrappy team.”And going into Illinois was another good match for us,” he added. “We had lost there the last three years, I believe, and to come out of there with a three game win was fantastic.”Waite noted that his team’s ability to prove it can win Big Ten matches on the road early on in conference play was crucial for the team’s goal to capture the conference crown.”[Being able to win on the road] was huge,” Waite said. “That’s something we have not done as well as we needed to the last couple of years and the Big Ten is tough. I’m really proud of our team and how they did so I think that said a lot for the road games … It was a great test for us and I’m really happy to come away with those wins.”Conference Rivalries: Wisconsin already toppled one of its biggest rivals in Minnesota earlier this year, but with fellow foe Penn State coming to town this weekend one can speculate which one is the better rivalry.Waite said the two rivalries are almost equal, but that his team may be getting the better of both the Golden Gophers and the Nittany Lions this season.”I would almost say Minnesota and Penn State are the two [biggest rivals] because of the border battle with Minnesota and the way the three programs have gone since 1999,” Waite said. “After you win, you go down a little bit, but I feel like we’re on our way back up and again we have a lot of sophomores starting so we’re still young and learning, but we’re right up there with the top of the pack.”The trio has been dominant in the conference and national scene the past few years with Penn State winning the national title in 1999, the Badgers making the national tournament every year since 1996, including a Big Ten title in 2001, and with Minnesota being a perennial top-25 team.Defense, the key to success: While Waite’s squad has had the reputation as being a great offensive team, it hasn’t always had the same success on the other side of the net. Nevertheless, he has worked extremely hard to improve the team’s defense and passing this year.As a result, the Badgers have become a much more balanced team and Waite is quick to point out that it all comes back to the defense.”The last couple of years I don’t think we were as balanced as a team that we needed to be offensively as opposed to defensively,” he said. “We had the block and we had the offense, but if you don’t pass and don’t dig then you can’t stay in game with the best teams.”We’ve improved that partly by recruiting by getting someone like Jocelyn Wack in there and also just trained hard for the last 8-10 months since last season to improve our season to improve our defense,” he added. “Our numbers are more balanced now, we’ve got the offensive threats, and its coming together better for us.”While all may sound perfect for the volleyball team this year as they are winning on the road, blocking well and passing well, Waite was reluctant to say his team doesn’t have anything to improve upon.”As a coaching staff, we know the things we need to work on and the players do too, and that’s the tough thing,” Waite said. “Sometimes I actually have to remind them to be more excited about the good things they do because they’re always thinking they should be better. They don’t realize they’re a top-10 team and they’ve beaten some very strong teams this year already, but because we’re always trying to make them better they feel like they have much more to learn, so they’re definitely hungry for more and trying to get better as the season goes on.”last_img read more

SLOT MACHINE: After being moved around early in his career, Ervin Philips finally has turned into a star as a slot receiver

first_img Published on August 30, 2017 at 12:34 am Contact Tomer: [email protected] | @tomer_langer,Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment. AdvertisementThis is placeholder textIt was a flashback to what happened frequently last year, and what will likely happen even more often when the season begins Sept. 1 against Central Connecticut State.Philips wasn’t consistently in the slot his first two seasons. He was nearly everywhere else. He arrived as a running back, the position he started at when he was at West Haven (Connecticut) High School. He also contributed as a kick returner, and assumed the role of the primary “hybrid” under then-offensive coordinator Tim Lester in 2015.In head coach Dino Babers’ up-tempo offense, he found a home at inside receiver, a place where he feels confident in his abilities as a playmaker. His 90 catches last season would have been the most ever for an SU receiver if not for the 94 grabbed by teammate Amba Etta-Tawo. With Etta-Tawo gone, Philips is poised to be one of Dungey’s top weapons.“I want to be the best receiver in the ACC,” Philips said.Even though he lined up primarily in the backfield at West Haven, the goal was to get him the ball in space. It’s why his high school coach Ed McCarthy ran jet sweeps with him and instructed his quarterbacks to throw him the ball in the flat. Philips set school records in touchdowns (88) and total offense (6,182 yards).When Philips was in high school, McCarthy watched many Mid-American Conference games, because they were frequently broadcast during the week. Unintentionally, it familiarized him with the Bowling Green offense run by Babers.“I almost knew that he would be the slot receiver (when Babers was hired at SU),” McCarthy said. “He’s made for that position really. I thought it was a perfect fit with him in the offense.”Babers said that during his first practice at SU, he and his staff instructed players to line up at whatever spot on the field they wanted to play at. Philips stood with the wide receivers.Wide receiver Steve Ishmael predicted Philips would excel if given the chance at receiver. They have been roommates for three years and now are the two senior wideouts who will be tasked with leading the offense. They spoke about this season as soon as they got back from winter break last year, Ishmael said.Philips said that earlier in his career, when he was being moved around a lot, he did not mind it. But from the first game last season, in which he set a school record with 14 receptions against Colgate, he knew he had found his permanent spot. After the breakout season he had last year, he is left wondering what might have been.“Now that I think about it,” Philips said, “I wish I had the time to really get used to one spot. When you’re at one position, you get to learn it more, you learn the ins and outs and you get to improve at that position. It’s (playing multiple roles early in his career) a blessing because it allowed me to show how versatile I can be, but at the same time I wish I could have stayed at one position.”To reach his individual goal of being the best receiver in the conference, Philips started working out at BreakOut Athlete, a local training facility that works with Division I and professional athletes.BOA has become known for its explosiveness training, director Frank Quido said, with the majority of its clients being football players who want to get faster off the line.It was initially difficult to develop a training regimen for Philips, Quido said, because he was already such a gifted athlete. But what stood out to Quido was Philips’ willingness to buy-in wholeheartedly to the training program, regardless of some of the untraditional exercises and equipment.“You know, most people when they come to my facility, this training is so much different than what they’re used to,” Quido said. “But he embraced everything I asked him to do. Never questioned why, never complained this was too hard.”The two worked together for about a month. In one drill, Philips stood behind a tackling dummy and Quido, standing on the other side, threw tennis balls both to the right and the left of the dummy. Philips stood in place, seeing where the balls were coming from and catching them to improve his hand-eye coordination.In another exercise focused on explosiveness, Philips ran on a treadmill while leaning forward until his chest touched a pole.Courtesy of Frank QuidoPhilips said he feels faster and stronger than he did a year ago. Junior Kielan Whitner has noticed it too. Whitner has played safety before for SU and is currently transitioning to linebacker. In both roles, he matches up with slot receivers in practice. This summer, in guarding Philips, Whitner said the hardest part is the bevy of moves that Philips can put on, forcing a defender to not key in on just one.“He got faster and more explosive off the line.” Quido said. “… We’re going to see him getting much more separation from defenders than we’ve ever seen before.”Philips is still learning on the job. He struggled in his shift trying to get off press coverage. He did not realize how important it was to use his hands before the throw is even made.McCarthy said, in retrospect, it’s a shame that Philips could not have redshirted his freshman season. Philips said he wishes he could have played in the slot all four years.With Etta-Tawo gone Philips recognizes that defenses might key in on him as the top target. His definition of being the best receiver in the ACC means being consistent every single game, not having a “rollercoaster” season. And even though he has been doing this for only one year, he is confident he can reach that status.“He just adjusts to things quickly,” Ishmael said. “He’s an athlete, he’s a football player and he’s been big time for us.”He proved Ishmael right a year ago. Now, to reach the postseason goals that he and Ishmael discussed, he needs to adjust to his new role. He needs to be big time.Banner photo by Jessica Sheldon Comments Ervin Philips burst off the line and went to block linebacker Shyheim Cullen. Eric Dungey took the snap and faked a pitch to running back Moe Neal who was split-out left.Syracuse’s first-string offense was scrimmaging against the second-string defense at the start of a practice inside the Ensley Athletic Center. On the first drive, the offense went three-and-out, drawing roars from the rest of the defense standing on the far sideline. To start the second drive, Dungey looked only toward his toward his speedy slot receiver. As Cullen bit on the fake pitch, Philips planted his left foot and burst right past the now flat-footed line linebacker, catching the ball thrown to the open space down the middle.last_img read more

Survival of the Nicest

first_imgBaboons monitored for personality did best if they fell in the “Nice” category.Science Now put up a headline that would have surprised Darwin: “For Some Primates, Survival of the Nicest.”  Three evolutionists watched 45 baboons for 7 years and classified their behaviors based on their grunts, and their hormones from droppings.We identified three relatively stable personality dimensions, each characterized by a distinct suite of behaviors that were not redundant with dominance rank or the availability of kin. Females scoring high on the “Nice” dimension were friendly to all females and often grunted to lower-ranking females to signal benign intent. “Aloof” females were aggressive, less friendly, and grunted primarily to higher-ranking females. “Loner” females were often alone, relatively unfriendly, and also grunted most often to higher-ranking females. Aloof and Loner females were rarely approached by others. Personality dimensions were correlated in different ways with three measures previously shown to be associated with fitness: stress levels and two behavioral indices reflecting the closeness of dyadic bonds formed by individuals. Females who scored high on Nice had high composite sociality indices (CSI) and stable partner preferences, whereas females who scored high on Aloof had lower CSI scores but significantly more stable partner preferences. Loner females had significantly lower CSI scores, less stable partner preferences, and significantly higher glucocorticoid levels.  (Seyfarth, Silk, and Cheney, “Variation in personality and fitness in wild female baboons,”  PNAS, 73/pnas.1210780109 PNAS October 1, 2012.) This finding seems to contradict over a century and a half of Darwinian thinking.  “By being a nice baboon, you increase the likelihood of having strong social bonds, which in turn translates to a better chance of passing on your genes,” Live Science wrote in “It pays to be a nice baboon.”  Actually, the experiment found both Nice and Aloof females doing about the same in terms of reproductive fitness.  The only losers were the loners.  Whatever the findings say about evolution appears ambivalent: “It remains to be determined which of the Nice or Aloof personality dimensions is more adaptive, or whether variation is maintained by contrasting effects on fitness.”Survival of the nicest.  Good grief.  All those genocides for nothing.This is silly.  Did the researchers watch the baboons 24 x 7 for seven years?  Maybe the baboons did all their selfish Darwinian antics when the researchers were asleep and on vacation.  Why didn’t they watch the males?  Are they sexist?  We can’t let these so-called scientists get away with rewriting history by using bogus categories.  Even Science Now, supposedly a functionary of that bastion of Darwinism, the AAAS, said, “Females who scored high on the ‘nice’ meter were friendly to all females.”  How do you calibrate a nice meter?  How do you measure friendliness?  What is that, in Darwin terms?No, we can’t let evolutionists get away with this.  Too much is at stake.  Darwin’s reputation must be preserved intact.  The triumph of German militarism and Russian conquest must maintain its scientific justification on true Darwinism.  Eugenics must not be undermined by those ID people.  No more Mr. Nice Baboon.  Give me survival of the fittest, and give me death! (Visited 20 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Man in the street, South Africa 2010 fan

first_img7 April 2010 “We are waiting … It is time for the people to stop putting us down and to come see for themselves that Africa can do it.” So says Gordon Mokonyane, Johannesburg resident, family man, Orlando Pirates fan – and supporter of the 2010 Fifa World Cup™ South Africa. Like many football-crazy South Africans, Mokonyane has been waiting impatiently since 15 May 2004, when it was announced that the Fifa World Cup would be heading to African soil for the first time in its 80-year history. If you are a Johannesburg resident, you might have seen Mokonyane. He is one of those people who tries to make a living selling mobile phone chargers, caps and sunglasses at busy intersections. He is one of those people who most of the time is ignored. But he’s not fussed, as they say here. “It is a job. It lets me put food on the table for my wife and daughter, and I get to spend the whole day outdoors.” Mokonyane seems to have a permanent smile on his face, but it is when the subject of football is broached that his eyes truly light up. Mokonyane is a supporter of top-flight Premier Soccer League team Orlando Pirates, as evidenced by his faded black kit, which he wears most days as he trades at different intersections around Johannesburg’s traffic-heavy northern suburbs. He doesn’t get to watch as many live football games as he would like, “but sometimes it is better to earn money than to enjoy yourself,” he says with a nod and a wink. Mokonyane’s forward-thinking manner has served him well though, as he recently found out that his brother-in-law’s ticket applications were successful and that he will be able to take his wife to two World Cup matches. “We are going to go watch Argentina against Korea Republic at Soccer City and Slovenia against the USA at Ellis Park,” he says. “It’s not Bafana Bafana or Brazil, my two favourite teams, but I don’t care. This is our World Cup, and I will be there.” He does admit, however, that seeing a player like Lionel Messi in the flesh will be a highlight for him. “For many people like me in South Africa, soccer is a way to escape. We live it,” he said as he stepped out into the road, winding through the afternoon rush hour traffic, flashing his trademark smile at a passing car. Mokonyane will be at the World Cup, and it is because of people like him that Africa’s first World Cup will long be remembered. Source: 2010 Fifa World Cup South Africa Organising Committeelast_img read more

Business Cloud Computing: Privacy Is Just As Important As Security

first_imgluke burns Tags:#cloud computing#enterprise#privacy#saas#security How Intelligent Data Addresses the Chasm in Cloud Related Posts Cloud Hosting for WordPress: Why Everyone is Mo…center_img Serverless Backups: Viable Data Protection for … Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Guest author Luke Burns is a partner at Ascent Venture Partners.Security and privacy are often mentioned in the same breath, but when it comes to cloud computing, security tends to be the dominant subject. But should it be? While there are seemingly endless security threats, cloud providers are becoming increasingly sophisticated and capable in addressing them.When it comes to privacy, though, cloud vendors have not made the same progress. In fact, it’s more than likely that Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) companies breach the customer’s perception of data privacy regularly.I’m not referring simply to consumer companies and their problems with privacy, e.g. Facebook sharing personal data with advertisers. Enterprise SaaS companies face their own unique challenges around customer data usage, even though those issues have not received the same level of scrutiny.Enterprise Services Know A Lot About Their CustomersThe challenging aspects of SaaS privacy arise from the close relationship between vendor and customer – a situation vastly different than in days of on-premise software. As the name suggests, SaaS vendors provide a service, and with that service comes the ability to log every keystroke and mouse click that a customer makes using their software.Why would a SaaS vendor do that?Think about customer relationship management (CRM) software as an example. What would you think if your CRM took note every time you updated a contact, and then made that updated contact information available to other users with that same business connection? Sounds like a pretty useful service for customers, doesn’t it?What Are Your Expectations For Data Privacy?But does it breach your expectation of data privacy? SaaS opens up the door to increased interaction and partnership between a customer and a vendor, but it also opens the door for misuse.One particularly interesting area with privacy concerns is the use of the metadata (data about the data). Let’s say, for example, there is a clear agreement that all data is owned by the customer and can’t be used by the vendor. But would that agreement also include things like the number of users (salespeople) actively using a CRM system or the number of new sales leads entered in a given quarter or the number of meetings booked?This type of data could yield tremendous insight to an individual trying to gauge sales activity at a given company or within a given sector. Would use of this metadata be covered under data ownership or could the SaaS vendor sell those insights to the highest bidder with a clear conscience?Then there’s obfuscated or anonymized data. Is it OK for a SaaS provider to use your data to create unattributed market statistics? Imagine a financial SaaS vendor that could create a composite view of all the private companies using its system and publish average earnings growth over various periods of time. Or a customer-service SaaS vendor that could create benchmarks on average time to close a trouble ticket. In each case, the vendor is producing valuable data points it can use for profit. Should there be any type of reimbursement for customers, or is it just a cost of doing business?Who Owns The Intellectual Property?Many SaaS platforms offer robust tools to customize the experience for individual customers and companies. These customizations often reflect significant investment in design and development and sometimes reflect proprietary business processes. How much exposure to these customizations does a SaaS vendor have? Could it use these customizations as templates for future product enhancements that might be offered to competitors of the customers that originally created them?We’re just scratching the surface of potential privacy issues that can arise with SaaS vendor relationships.Don’t get me wrong; I’m not saying companies should avoid SaaS. In fact, I think the benefits of embracing software in the cloud far outweigh the potential risks. The close relationship developed between a SaaS vendor and its customers has the potential to deliver significant payback, especially for companies embracing SaaS not for cost savings, but for business transformation.But both sides of that equation, the vendor and the customer, need to fully understand the bargain and the trade-offs made between privacy and business value.Asking The Tough Privacy QuestionsSimilar to their IT security due diligence, companies need to ask questions about the privacy of their data before they enter into a cloud vendor relationship.Who owns the data? How many copies of the data are there? How can you ensure that data is erased or unreadable in the event that a customer chooses to decommission or change service providers? And especially, What is the vendor’s acceptable use of a company’s cloud-based data?Hopefully, better awareness and transparency about these issues will build trust and help business-facing cloud vendors avoid the lawsuits that have afflicted their consumer-facing cousins.last_img read more

Rethinking The NFLs Rooney Rule For More Diversity At The Top

As word spread quickly in January 2007 that Mike Tomlin would be the next head coach of the Pittsburgh Steelers, no one needed to explain the significance of the move to Steve Jackson. Then a safeties coach with the Washington Redskins, Jackson was among the many African-American assistants rooting for Tomlin to get the job. Just a few years earlier, Tomlin, who had just completed his first season as the Minnesota Vikings’ defensive coordinator, probably wouldn’t have been on the short list for one of the most prestigious coaching gigs in professional sports. But under the Rooney Rule, times were changing.“For me, that’s the one that really stood out,” said Jackson, now the Tennessee Titans’ assistant secondary coach. “It was the Steelers. That’s one of those jobs that everyone looks at. And he wasn’t the leading candidate when he walked in for the interview, but he got in that room and he made his case. That’s what we all want: just to have a real chance to compete for the job. A lot of us [black coaches] looked at that and said, ‘Yeah.’”There’s no debating that the Rooney Rule has had a positive impact on the NFL. By providing owners with the first leaguewide tool to make hiring potentially more inclusive, the NFL took a significant step toward changing its culture. The rule continues to be expanded, and major corporations have followed the league’s lead. But in a workplace in which the overwhelming majority of players are African-American, the NFL has many more opportunities to strengthen the rule and further increase diversity in its management ranks.In place since 2003 for head coaches and expanded in 2009 to include general manager jobs and equivalent front-office positions, the rule — named after Dan Rooney, Pittsburgh Steelers chairman and onetime head of the league’s diversity committee — mandates that an NFL team must interview at least one minority candidate for these jobs. The rule, however, has two fatal flaws: the temptation to substitute sham interviews in place of a search for real diversity, and coordinator-level positions, a crucial step to head-coaching jobs, are not under the umbrella.The NFL did recently expand the rule again to include women: For all executive openings in the commissioner’s office, a woman must be interviewed. The San Francisco 49ers were the first team to formally adopt the practice, but the same flaws still apply.But the league did provide a blueprint for corporate America to improve its poor hiring record when it comes to diversity. Facebook, Pinterest, Intel, Xerox and Amazon are among the major companies that have instituted their own version of the rule. Even the Pentagon has explored using some form of the rule to diversify its officer corps.“The Rooney Rule really has become the best practice for diversity and inclusion,” said Robert Gulliver, the NFL’s executive vice president of human resources and chief diversity officer. “The Rooney Rule is all about access and opportunity, and it’s exciting to see where we are now after having the Rooney Rule in place for 12 years when you look at what the Rooney Rule has delivered.”In the 12 seasons before the rule was instituted, the NFL had only six non-white head coaches. In 12 seasons under the rule, the league has added 14 head coaches of color. From the NFL’s standpoint, there were other encouraging numbers last season regarding diversity. The Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sports at the University of Central Florida found that:At the start of last season, there were six head coaches of color, one more than in 2014. In 2011, the NFL had an all-time high of eight head coaches of color.There were seven African-American general managers in 2015 and for the ninth consecutive year, there were at least five general managers of color.Eight of the last 18 Super Bowl teams have had either an African-American head coach or general manager.Clearly, minorities have made modest strides in filling leadership positions. The problem is, there are 32 NFL teams. Even at its highest point, minority representation among coaches was a meager 25 percent. Almost 68 percent of the NFL’s players are African-American, but there are no African-American team presidents, and only one team president of color. Although the NFL received an A grade for overall racial-hiring practices from Central Florida, only 19.4 percent of the league’s professional positions — front-office and business-operations personnel — were filled by “people of color” in 2015. The numbers tell the story: There’s still plenty of work to do.Jeremi Duru wrote the book on the Rooney Rule. Literally. In Advancing The Ball: Race, Reformation, and the Quest for Equal Coaching Opportunity in the NFL, Duru masterfully details the history of the process that resulted in the rule. Duru, a law professor at American University’s Washington College of Law, agrees that the rule is not perfect, but “the whole idea of it is to prompt kind of a culture change in the league,” he said. “It’s not that the outcome of each particular interviewing season is going to vindicate the rule, but rather that the rule will put in place the sense that, in order to be the best, you have to think broadly. It’s the idea that in order to succeed and be competitive, you have to look at a deep pool of candidates.”One of the biggest criticisms of the rule is that it hasn’t effected change fast enough. For the rule to have been in place so long, some African-American commentators have argued, the NFL should have many more minorities in the highest-ranking positions. “It’s extremely difficult to eradicate a long-standing problem quickly,” Duru said. “The Emancipation Proclamation itself isn’t going to be a panacea. But it creates a culture where there’s no longer lawful slavery, and where we start to see progress, slowly but surely.“In the end in the NFL, hopefully, the idea is that it really becomes clear that the best coaches come from all sorts of different places. And if you think broadly about coaching and you slow down and take time with your hire, you’re going to find yourself with the best outcome. It’s not a consequence of the rule itself, but of the culture that the rule has ushered in.”Unfortunately for the NFL, the public perception is that sham interviews are integral to the league’s culture. Invariably each season, rumors have swirled that some teams interviewed African-American candidates only to comply with the rule. In January, the timing and execution of the Philadelphia Eagles’ hiring of new coach Doug Pederson raised questions about whether they had violated the spirit of the rule. The Eagles interviewed Duce Staley, a former Philadelphia player and current assistant coach on the team. Staley had never been a coordinator and only served as a position coach for three seasons. To many league observers, it appeared the Eagles had skirted the rule by interviewing an in-house candidate who obviously lacked the experience to be a head coach.That’s where the Fritz Pollard Alliance comes in. Together with the league’s front office, they determine whether a team’s interview process is legitimate. In the first year of the rule, commissioner Roger Goodell’s predecessor, Paul Tagliabue, fined former Detroit Lions general manager Matt Millen $200,000 for “failing to discharge his duties” under the rule.Although the specter of fines should serve as a deterrent to teams violating the rule, there’s another step the league could take to ensure compliance besides the removal of draft picks: require teams to provide transcripts of interviews with minority candidates. That way, the Fritz Pollard Alliance and the commissioner’s office could judge for themselves whether teams adhered to the spirit of the rule.“The Rooney Rule requires that there be a meaningful interview of a person of color, not just an interview,” Duru said. “Any mechanism that can be used to ensure an interview that is meaningful should be on the table.”However, among NFL decision-makers, there’s no momentum for detailed transcripts to become part of the process. “What is important is getting interview feedback,” the NFL’s Gulliver said. “We really do find that getting feedback, getting candidate feedback, on what worked and what didn’t work, and what can even be better the next time, will help candidates as they continue their quests to become a head coach or a general manager.”That being said, covering more potential candidates under the rule would seem to be a logical next step. Generally, coordinators have the most responsibility among assistant coaches. Owners often pluck coordinators from successful teams to become head coaches. If there were more minority coordinators in the pipeline, theoretically, there would be more minorities in the applicant pool for head coaching positions. The Rooney Rule does nothing to address that basic fact.In response to the NFL’s horrible hiring record after the 2012 season (eight head coaches and seven general managers were fired; 15 white guys were hired), the Fritz Pollard Alliance proposed that coordinator-level and team president positions should be covered under the rule. The NFL rejected the proposal, but in 2013 the league did restart the Career Development Symposium, which previously ran from 1998-2008.The commissioner’s office requested that teams send two representatives, including at least one person of color, who aspire to be general managers and head coaches, to a three-day program at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. Besides networking with decision-makers from throughout the league, participants honed their interview skills through presentations and panel discussions. (In March, the league had its first Women’s Career Development Symposium.)But remember: Last season, the league had only six head coaches of color and seven African-American general managers. Obviously, the Career Development Symposium didn’t hobble efforts to improve minority hiring — but how much did it help? It just seems that including coordinator positions under the rule could be another major turning point in the ongoing struggle to level the playing field.In ESPN The Magazine’s Feb. 8 Super Bowl 50 Issue, senior writer Mina Kimes wrote that white position coaches and assistants are more than twice as likely to be promoted to coordinator than their African-American counterparts, according to research from professors at Georgetown, George Washington, Emory and Iowa State University. Moreover, those promotions occur regardless of the white coaches’ performance, experience and coaching background. The data shouldn’t be ignored.The Titans’ Jackson is a 13-year NFL assistant. Despite his experience, Jackson knows it’s downright impossible to make the leap from an assistant coach to a head coach without first being a coordinator.“There’s always a network, an inner circle, and then there are others,” he said. “And if you’re in the others, you have to do everything you can to get in the door.”The argument against expanding the rule to include coordinator positions is that head coaches should be allowed to pick their staffs without any restrictions on interviewing. There may be something to that.During the 2007 and 2008 seasons, Brian Stewart directed the Dallas Cowboys’ defense. If coordinators are covered under the rule, Stewart envisions the potential for conflict. “That would be rough,” said Stewart, now a college coach at Nebraska who works with defensive backs. “You really have to leave picking those guys [coordinators] to the head coaches. They have to be allowed to choose their own people.“That’s one of the benefits of reaching the level of head coach. And if you don’t let them interview only the guys they want to interview, it could really open up a can of worms when you talk about relationships on the staff. If guys feel like a coordinator didn’t get the job the right way, there could be a lot of resentment from all the other assistants. It could be a problem. It could be a big problem.”Of course, there’s often resistance to change. When the rule was instituted, many within the league suggested head coaches wouldn’t have credibility if they were hired as a result of the process. But who would argue that great coaches such as Hall of Famer Tony Dungy, Tomlin and Carolina Panthers’ Ron Rivera lack credibility? The Steelers’ pick of Tomlin worked out spectacularly.The Rooney Rule is still evolving and growing pains are part of the process. But with the NFL on the right track, it’s definitely not time to slow down. Editor’s note: Tuesday was opening day at The Undefeated, a new ESPN website that explores the intersections of race, sports and culture. In an introductory letter, Kevin Merida, its editor-in-chief, says the site won’t shrink from covering challenging subjects with a mix of original reporting, innovative storytelling, provocative commentary, must-see video, narratives and investigations. At FiveThirtyEight, we’re so excited at having a new sibling that we’ve been running several of The Undefeated’s articles on our site this week — including the one that follows here — and we have big plans for partnerships in the future. More stories from The Undefeated:Serena: The embodiment of it all by LZ GrandersonDon’t believe the fairy-tale mythology that sports promote by Domonique FoxworthWill my 2-year-old nephew end up like Michael Brown? by Wendi Thomas read more

TCI Ministry of Tourism Honors Mrs Tina Fenimore

first_img Related Items: Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp#TurksandCaicos, March 14, 2018 – Grand Turk – The Ministry of Tourism in commemoration of Women’s International Day 2018 under the theme “Press for Progress”; Minister of Tourism, Hon. Ralph Higgs along with staff paid tribute to Mrs. Tina Fenimore for her immeasurable contribution not only to tourism but national development.  Mrs. Fenimore was the first local, female hotelier on the Island of Grand Turk and instrumental in both the Grand Turk and Providenciales Chambers of Commerce.Her dreams turning the Turks and Caicos Islands into a tourism destination is truly seen today.  Her actions were a part of the engine that still assists in driving the local economy; The business provided employment for a number of residents and saw countless guests.  Mrs. Fenimore mentored and trained many local employees, allowing for direct socio-economic injection to the community.  She also operated a travel agency, T & C Travel, along with other tourism related businesses since the early 70’s through 90’s.Minister, Hon. Higgs commented; “It is an honor and pleasure to recognize Mrs. Fenimore for her unselfish contribution to the tourism industry, she has always been a champion for our destination since its modern infancy.  She has historically promoted the Turks and Caicos, which we are grateful for; especially today.  We are happy to highlight the accomplishment of women in the various sectors as their efforts have paved the way for the empowerment of women in leadership across every sphere.”There are many women, past and present who have played key roles in developing our tourism industry.  The sustained growth over the years is testament to their ingenuity and involvement.  The Turks and Caicos Islands is truly a place of gender equality as women play leading roles at the executive level.  As we pay special recognition to accomplished women, we must be mindful of young aspiring women who seek to follow their lead in breaking through glass ceilings.Let us thank God for all he has given as we reflect on all accomplishments of women throughout the country; the Ministry of Tourism, Environment, Heritage, Maritime and Gaming extend best wishes to the hardworking women across the globe for a Happy International Women’s day!Release: TCIG Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApplast_img read more