Fed personnel agency admits history of security problems

center_img Early signs of cataracts in your parents and how to help WASHINGTON (AP) — An Office of Personnel Management investigative official said Tuesday the agency entrusted with millions of personnel records has a history of failing to meet basic computer network security requirements.Michael Esser, assistant inspector general for audit, said in testimony prepared for delivery that for years many of the people running the agency’s information technology had no IT background. He also said the agency had not disciplined any employees for the agency’s failure to pass numerous cyber security audits. Administration officials have left many questions unanswered, including why the latest hacks went undetected for months. The federal chief information officer, Tony Scott, ordered government agencies to beef up their network security by scanning logs, patching security holes, and accelerating their use authentication that goes beyond passwords.___Associated Press writers Alicia A. Caldwell in Washington and Raphael Satter in London contributed to this report.___Follow Ken Dilanian on Twitter at https://twitter.com/KenDilanianAPCopyright © The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Sponsored Stories 4 must play golf courses in Arizona New Valley school lets students pick career-path academies FILE – In this April 22, 2015 file photo, House Oversight Committee Chairman Rep. Jason Chaffetz, R-Utah, speaks on Capitol Hill in Washington. When hackers broke into a database filled with the private information of U.S. security clearance holders, they likely got access to the names of foreign relatives of some of those officials who are living abroad. “It may be the single biggest breach of data that our government has ever had,” said Chaffetz on teh C-SPAN Newsmakers program, calling the stolen data “the most sensitive information we have.” (AP Photo/Cliff Owen, File)last_img read more