Military Leaders from the Americas Discuss Common Issues

first_imgBy Dialogo February 06, 2013 Military leaders from Central America visited U.S. Army North on January 30 as part of the Central American Regional Leaders’ Conference, hosted by U.S. Army South, in a cooperative effort to establish closer ties between militaries and to improve coordination on common issues. International students from the Western Hemisphere Institute for Security Cooperation (WHINSEC), U.S. Army Maneuver Center of Excellence, based in Fort Benning, Georgia, visited Army North to learn about the mission and structure of the U.S. Northern Command’s Joint Force Land Component Command. “The WHINSEC visit allowed us to highlight Army North’s role in defending the homeland in depth through security cooperation with our neighboring countries – Canada and Mexico,” said Major Albert Marckwardt, Mexico branch officer at Army North. “For the students, equivalent to the U.S. Army ranks of major and lieutenant colonel, it was also an opportunity to understand how we support civilian authorities at the tactical and operational level.” WHINSEC students from Panama, Colombia, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Honduras, Costa Rica, Paraguay, Canada, Belize and Mexico learned about Army North’s unique missions and discussed regional efforts with hemispheric partner nations to combat transnational criminal organizations. Military leaders from Nicaragua, Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador, and Panama’s director of its National Border Service toured Army North’s historic Quadrangle, attended command briefings and heard from Oscar Salinas Jr., assistant chief of U.S. Customs and Border Patrol, who touted the success Army North has had working with the Mexican land and air forces, known as SEDENA. “The Border Patrol’s new strategic plan focuses on integration with federal, state, local and foreign partnerships,” said Salinas. “The collaboration between Army North and SEDENA is one example of this integration.” While WHINSEC students have visited Army North in years past, the visit of Army commanders from Central America on this opportunity was unique. “This is probably the first time we’ve worked this closely with Army South and with Central American army commanders, and this greater dialogue is a healthy thing,” said Lt. Gen. William Caldwell IV, commanding general, Army North (Fifth Army), and senior commander, Fort Sam Houston and Camp Bullis. “We’ve been building our interactions over the years – and we want it to continue,” he added. Major General Perry Wiggins, deputy commanding general of operations at Army North, discussed the importance of building relationships and fostering communication in combating transnational criminal organizations. “They’re going to move to the path of least resistance,” said Wiggins. “A solution without Central America, South America, Canada and Mexico gives them a gap. Our adversary we’re dealing with is very smart. [If we] protect the land and water, [then] they use ultralights and tunnels.” Progress has been made, but there is more to be done, and Army North needs to foster relationships with other nations like it has done with Mexico, said Wiggins. “We are getting back into a cooperative state,” he said. “I can tell you the synergy we have created with SEDENA has blossomed into something where relationships have carried the day.”last_img read more

Refresh with the NEXTGEN experience

first_img 3SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Marlin Froese As the Manager of Banking Systems, Marlin Froese leads the Banking System team at Access Credit Union where he provides strategic leadership on all banking system related matters and manages … Web: www.accesscu.ca Details The NYLC (made up of young credit union leaders from across Canada) is a bridge between today’s young leaders and the leadership roles that will play a crucial role in the success of Canada’s credit union system of tomorrow.Supported by Credit union Central of Canada, we develop tools, resources, and networks to support today’s up-and-coming credit union leaders, equipping them with the skills and competencies they need to serve the credit union system in positions of influence, addressing head-on the challenges and changes facing our industry.The NYLC will strive to provide today’s young leaders with a collaborative platform to share their perspectives on system challenges and opportunities, ensuring that the next generation of senior leaders leaves their mark on the credit union system of the future. Spring is upon us (according to the calendar) which means it’s time for all that spring cleaning.  Yes, the garage needs to be cleaned out and swept.  Yes, the car needs to be vacuumed, wiped down and washed.  Yes, the entire house needs to be dusted from top to bottom, even in those extremely hard to reach places that no one actually sees.  It’s that time of year to roll up the sleeves, get your favorite Swiffer utility out, and fight back against those dreaded dust bunnies.Why do we put ourselves through this painful task year, after year, after year?The answer is best described in one word.  Refresh.No, I’m not talking about the little circular arrow button you see on your internet browser.  I’m talking about that amazing feeling of pulling your vehicle into a freshly cleaned garage where you can open your door without hitting last year’s summer building project.  I’m talking about getting into the car and taking that first breath of fresh automobile cleaner air.  I’m talking about that refreshing feeling when you walk into your house and everything just looks mint.On May 3rd and 4th, 55 bright and energetic credit union young and emerging leaders will come together to network, collaborate, and refresh their leadership toolkit at the annual CU NEXTGEN session hosted by Credit union Central of Canada’s NYLC (National Young Leaders Committee).This year’s event is titled Leading from the Inside-out. Developing Self and Others.  Self-awareness in key areas is a critical step on the road to achieving better outcomes as a leader.  Prior to the conference each attendee will be required to complete analytical pre-work.Each attendee will work to understand themselves better and subsequently utilize that gained understanding to create refreshing opportunities for growth and development.  Our passionate facilitator will relate the results to integrated leadership models, leaving the attendees with some tangible take-a-ways.  Everyone at the CU NEXTGEN event will be taking steps toward excellence in leadership.Also, back by popular demand the event will be featuring some of the credit union system’s most influential leaders in our Human Library.  The Human Library gives the young and emerging leaders in attendance the opportunity to ask the influential leaders thought provoking questions in a personalized environment about leadership or the credit union system.  Sounds refreshing, doesn’t it?For more information, check out http://www.cucentral.ca/NationalYoungLeaders/SitePages/Home.aspxNational Young Leaders Committee (NYLC)center_img Our Vision: Strengthening the Credit Union System by Bridging Generations of Leadershiplast_img read more

Local Artist Draws Attention to “Vanishing Species” with Sculpture

first_imgBaby sea turtle with matching turtle jewelry by Norman GitzenGitzen explains what is causing the decline in sea life in our waters here in South Florida and what can be done to prevent it.Listen to the full interview here.SFS Vanishing Species ArtFor more information on Norman Gitzen’s artwork click here. Local artist, Norman Gitzen, has been sculpting a “Vanishing Species Series” for nearly two decades to draw attention to the decline in marine life.Norman crafts sea turtles, sailfish, dolphin, coral reefs and other marine life out of metal, leaving holes in the bodies to simulate their disappearance from the environment due to chemicals, rising temperatures and over fishing in our area. Gitzen recently was commissioned by TD Bank’s lead architect who researched his art to sculpt a vanishing sea turtle for their Miami Beach bank branch. The sculptures are forged out of bronze or steel and feature the characteristics of the sea animal…with parts of the interior missing. The absence of the metal is a metaphor for the vanishing marine life in South Florida.Artist, Norman GitzenWith “Vanishing Species Turtle” commissioned by TD Bank on Miami Beach.last_img read more