Chelsea players ruined Roman Abramovich’s speech after Europa League final victory against Arsenal

first_img Comment Metro Sport ReporterThursday 30 May 2019 11:36 amShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link71Shares Roman Abramovich and Cesar Azpilicueta celebrate with the Europa League trophy (Getty Images)Chelsea owner Roman Abramovich attempted to give his team a speech after their Europa League final victory over Arsenal – but his efforts were ruined by the players.Maurizio Sarri ended the season on a high and secured the first trophy of his career as his side smashed Arsenal 4-1 in Baku.For the first time this season, Abramovich was able to watch his team in action at a stadium as he has been unable to visit Stamford Bridge due to issues with his UK visa.After the win, Abramovich celebrated with his Chelsea players and the Europa League trophy.ADVERTISEMENTBut his attempt to deliver a speech in Chelsea’s dressing room didn’t go according to plan. Chelsea ended the season on a high with a 4-1 win over Arsenal (Getty Images)Meanwhile, Abramovich and Chelsea’s hierarchy are set to speak with Sarri over his future at Stamford Bridge.‘I need to talk to the club and make sure I know what I can do for Chelsea and what Chelsea can do for me,’ Sarri said after the final.‘I love the Premier League and I’m lucky I’m at Chelsea but at the end of each season you have to sit down and talk.‘In my opinion, I deserve to stay at Chelsea but my opinion is not enough.’More: Arsenal FCArsenal flop Denis Suarez delivers verdict on Thomas Partey and Lucas Torreira movesThomas Partey debut? Ian Wright picks his Arsenal starting XI vs Manchester CityArsene Wenger explains why Mikel Arteta is ‘lucky’ to be managing Arsenal Chelsea players ruined Roman Abramovich’s speech after Europa League final victory against Arsenalcenter_img Advertisement Advertisement Roman Abramovich attended his first Chelsea game this season (Getty Images)More: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man CityAdvertisementAdvertisementAs Abramovich tried to speak, Chelsea’s players bombarded the club’s owner by throwing objects at him.And the 52-year-old left without being able to properly address his players.‘He came and when he was trying to speak the guys were throwing things at him and he left,’ David Luiz told The Sun.last_img read more

End of life choice Bill to affect society’s vulnerable the most says hospice doctor

first_imgStuff co.nz 5 July 2019Family First Comment: “The vulnerable, aged and disabled face coercion and exploitation should the End of Life Choice Bill become law in NZ, a top palliative specialist in Timaru says. Passing the bill could erode compassion, and confirms an ideology that considers some lives are not worth living even if that person sees value in it. It changes a whole moral shift that we put more value in some people’s lives than others.”Protect.org.nzThe vulnerable, aged and disabled in South Canterbury face coercion and exploitation should the End of Life Choice Bill become law in New Zealand, a top palliative specialist in the region says.Passing the bill could erode compassion, and confirms an ideology that considers some lives are not worth living even if that person sees value in it, Dr Catherine D’Souza says.“It changes a whole moral shift that we put more value in some people’s lives than others.“The people we are supposed to protect in society – the old, the vulnerable, the disabled – they’re the ones who feel the pressure and feel the lack of value in their lives.”D’Souza, employed and shared by both South Canterbury Hospice and the District Health Board, said she has never been asked about assisted dying as yet in South Canterbury.READ MORE: https://www.stuff.co.nz/timaru-herald/life/113898442/end-of-life-choice-bill-to-affect-societys-vulnerable-the-most-says-palliative-specialistKeep up with family issues in NZ. Receive our weekly emails direct to your Inbox.last_img read more

USC political organizations hold student debate

first_imgAudience members were allowed to pose their own questions to debaters. When asked how citizens can influence lawmakers to avoid intervention in Venezuela, USC GOP expressed disinterest in social action, while the other student groups voiced encouragement for social actions like protests.  “I thought maybe the moderators could’ve been, you know, a little more prepared, but it sounded like they had been subbed in last minute by somebody who canceled, so I can’t blame them too much for that,” said Reed Barnes, a junior majoring in computer science. Students discussed the current political and economic crisis in Venezuela, climate change and homelessness, among other topics at a political debate Tuesday hosted by Unruh Associates and the Political Student Assembly at Ground Zero Performance Café.   Nearly 20 students attended the debate, which featured USC GOP, Trojan Advocates for Political Progress, USC College Democrats and Trojans for Liberty.  Tuesday’s debate featured members of USC GOP, Trojan Advocates for Political Progress, USC College Democrats and Trojans for Liberty. (Krystal Gallegos/Daily Trojan) “I definitely thought this was going to be a lot more contentious,” said Guillermo Gutiérrez, a junior majoring in political science.  Students also commented on Sanders’ last-minute cancellation. Political Student Assembly Director Briana Miles and Unruh Associates Vice President José Guillermo Gutiérrez moderated the debate after organizers scrambled to find a new debate moderator. Symone Sanders, a Center for Political Future fellow and former national press secretary for 2016 presidential candidate Bernie Sanders, canceled at the last minute.  “I feel like people had different varying degrees of [political] expertise, and sometimes, certain political groups were clearly more educated on certain topics than others,” said Josh Masters, a senior majoring in animation and digital arts. “And to me, it wasn’t always a fair debate … I would want someone who disagrees with me to be well-prepared.” center_img “By 2050, we can reduce up to 80 percent of the net greenhouse gases we emit with the carbon tax that was just recently proposed by a bipartisan group of members of Congress and supported largely by Democrats,” said College Dems representative Andrew Binder, a freshman majoring in philosophy, politics and law. “Preventative measures, I think, is the best way the state can provide help [to homelessness],” Scavo said. “Mental health facilities, transportation, that sort of thing, is really important … I don’t know how effective providing affordable housing is when helping homeless populations because it’s not a supply issue, it’s a demand issue.”  TAPP, College Democrats and Trojans for Liberty switched out their debaters for the second topic of the night: climate change. Representatives addressed whether implementing the carbon tax would prove beneficial for climate change, which split the debaters into two groups. TAPP and College Dems supported the tax.  The debate ended with a discussion on homelessness in the country. Student representatives examined the government’s responsibility to address the homelessness crisis.  “I [do not] think it’s a big enough partisan issue to gain support to actually do anything to persuade lawmakers,” said USC GOP representative John Scavo, a sophomore majoring in political economy. “They’re going to do what they want.”  Representatives from each group presented on the topics, beginning with a discussion about the United States’ involvement in the current political crisis in Venezuela. They spoke briefly about their doubt over the United States’ intervention techniques in other countries. All agreed that non-intervention was the ideal solution.  While the representatives expressed contention over finer points of homelessness like zoning restrictions, they agreed homelessness is a complex issue. No one presented a singular solution to address the crisis but instead discussed contributing factors like addiction and mental health issues. last_img read more