Love Of Hollywood’s Golden Era Brings Generations Of Filmgoers Together At Cinema Arts Centre

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Watching Hollywood movies never gets old for Raj Tawney, the young director of publicity for the Cinema Arts Centre in Huntington, especially if the films are classics from the 1940s, ’50s and ’60s.“They call it the Golden Age for a reason,” says the 29-year-old with a broad smile. “It was an era in which you had almost 60 to 90 million people attending a film all at once. It really reached a mass cultural moment.”Gone are the days when everybody in America routinely flocked to their neighborhood movie palaces to see the same flick the moment it premiered. But Tawney, who grew up on Long Island, is devoted to recreating that experience as best he can by hosting special events and screenings at Huntington’s premier film facility, where the usual fare is primarily foreign and independent movies, as opposed to commercial blockbusters.Recently, he introduced an anniversary screening of Breakfast at Tiffany’s, which he says is “a great example of a movie that bridges generations.” The turnout was very gratifying. “To watch a 50-plus-year-old movie and see so many young people in the audience was really encouraging. We know we’re going in the right direction.”A graduate of Farmingdale State, where he was a communications major, Tawney got exposed to Hollywood’s heyday by watching Turner Classic Movies with his Puerto Rican grandmother at her place in the Bronx.“My family is from all over the place,” he explains, noting that his father emigrated from India in the 1970s. “I grew up in a Puerto Rican, Indian and Italian household. I had the best food!”He learned early on that films could enable him to bridge the generations. His Italian grandfather, who died when Tawney was an infant, used to play Sinatra “all the time.” One day while he and his grandmother were watching Doris Day and Frank Sinatra in the 1955 film Young at Heart, he says it struck a chord.“It was a way for me to connect with my grandparents through a film they had watched when they were teenagers,” he recalls. That passion has become his mission at Cinema Arts, where he’s been since 2015.“I’m always looking for new ideas to reach audiences with different types of genres,” says Tawney, who fittingly is also a member of the Suffolk County Legislature’s Next Generation Advisory Council.Legendary Hollywood agent Budd Burton Moss, who will be the subject of an in-depth discussion and multi-media presentation at Cinema Arts Centre in Huntington on Nov. 6.On Nov. 6 at the Cinema Arts, Tawney will be hosting an in-depth discussion and multi-media presentation with the legendary Hollywood agent Budd Burton Moss, who’s a living connection to a world that most young people have only read about. The 86-year-old Moss hung out with Clark Gable, Spencer Tracy, Katherine Hepburn and Marilyn Monroe, to name a few stars. Sidney Poitier was the best man at one of Moss’s weddings. Every week in Los Angeles, Moss still goes out for bagels with his pal Larry King, who wrote the foreword to Moss’ new book, Hollywood: Sometimes the Reality Is Better Than the Dream. When Moss was a talent agent, he represented Bette Davis, Mia Farrow, and, most importantly, Rita Hayworth, with whom he became very close friends, as well as her manager. Currently, Moss is on a crusade to get the underrated actress, who died in 1987, honored with her own U.S. Postal Service stamp.Moss had a fabled childhood growing up on the back lots of Hollywood. His father was a film editor at Fox, and his uncle was Sam Zimbalist, who produced the Oscar-winning Ben-Hur (1960) along with the Oscar-nominees Quo Vadis (1952) and King Solomon’s Mines (1951). First wanting to become an actor himself, Moss was an extra on the set of Sidney Poitier’s breakout film, Blackboard Jungle. Later, after he’d switched careers, they became long-lasting friends.“He’s a fascinating man,” says Tawney, who’s never met Moss, although they talk “almost every day.” It all began one day while his Cinema Arts colleagues were at the Toronto Film Festival. Tawney took a call from a woman who said she knew Moss well, and insisted that he should invite Moss to Huntington. He did. The rest is history: film history.Following the special event in Huntington, Tawney will be hosting Moss at The Amsterdam at Harborside in Port Washington on Nov. 10 to moderate another conversation and book signing, under the auspices of the Gold Coast International Film Festival—the first time the two groups have partnered together on a project.“Raj is amazing!” says Regina Gil, executive director of the Gold Coast International Film Festival. “He’s got the energy and the enthusiasm befitting a young person but he’s also got what they call an alte kopf, a Yiddish expression that means ‘old soul.’ He really knows how to connect to young people, old people, everybody in between.”Gil first met Moss a few years ago at the film festival when he was promoting his first memoir. This time, she connected with Tawney through a mutual friend, and suggested that he host Moss at the festival venue as well as at the Cinema Arts.“Budd has become an activist for the Golden Age of Hollywood,” Gil says. “He is coming back because he’s written another book, and he wants to honor Rita Hayworth. She was one of the great stars of the Golden Era. She started out as an amazing singer and dancer—and she was Hispanic. Hollywood plucked her out of the cantina circuit. You didn’t become a star in those days without having a ton of talent.”Gil has similar regard for Tawney.“Raj is young; he’s talented,” she says. “I’m delighted that our two entities in Nassau County and Suffolk County can partner together.”Budd Burton Moss gushed about working with Tawney.“Since I was introduced to Raj Tawney at the Cinema Arts Centre,” says Moss, “I have found a new excitement due to his unique understanding of many of my clients and his understanding of our motion picture and TV industry.”Tawney does bear an uncanny resemblance to a younger version of Budd Burton Moss, so it will certainly be entertaining to see the two film aficionados on the same stage.Just don’t ask Tawney to name his favorite films.“I hate that question!” he says, laughing. But if Tawney could go back in time for one movie premiere, it would be when Alfred Hitchock’s Psycho came out in 1960.“Can you imagine how scary that might have been to anybody?” Tawney asks. “Hitchcock forced you to use your imagination!”One of the first classic films Tawney helped bring to Huntington was Hitchcock’s Shadow of a Doubt, starring Teresa Wright and Joseph Cotten, which came out in 1943 and was nominated for an Oscar. He screened the film on one evening in the middle of the work week but it still found its audience.“I couldn’t believe how packed it was!” Tawney exclaims.Cinema Arts Centre Publicity Director Raj Tawney with an actress at the venue’s recent anniversary screening of Breakfast at Tiffany’s.In March, the Cinema Arts presented a 70 mm version of The Good, The Bad and The Ugly to celebrate the 50th anniversary of Sergio Leone’s classic spaghetti western starring Clint Eastwood. The original celluloid film stock is always Tawney’s favorite format, because he believes it makes the cinematic experience much more authentic than a slick, remastered digital version.“We’re an art house cinema,” he explains. “We’ve been around for 43 years. We’ve outlived the VCR, the DVD, the Blu-ray…“We want the reel,” says Tawney emphatically. “There’s something about those little chips and cracks in the film stock that make you feel like you’re watching it as an audience watched it when it first came out. Maybe it’s our romanticized vision, but I think there’s something to it.”Recently, Tawney arranged an event featuring film historian Irene P. Eckert, an octogenarian whom he calls “a Renaissance lady,” for a special presentation of Divorce Italian Style, starring Marcello Mastroianni, which won an Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay in 1962. It was another successful evening that brought different demographics together.“For me, it’s about the emotional connection,” Tawney says. “We have film historians, event hosts, to lead the discussion. How did you feel about the film afterwards? Not just to psychoanalyze it. That’s what my grandma always asked me, too. Right away, as soon as the film’s done, what do you feel about it?”Tawney knows that someone streaming a movie at home alone won’t have that kind of dialogue.“At the end of the day, the reason people still come to watch movies, is because you’re looking for an experience to share with a group,” Tawney says. “That’s why movies exist. They bring people together.”Main Art: Raj Tawney, director of publicity at Cinema Arts Centre, proudly displaying one of the many original celluloid film reels showcased at the Huntington venue (Spencer Rumsey / Long Island PressCinema Arts Centre is located at 432 Park Ave., Huntington, NY. cinemaartscentre.org The Gold Coast International Film Festival runs Nov. 10 to Nov. 15 at various theaters and venues throughout the Town of North Hempstead. For a complete list of films and showtimes, check out goldcoastfilmfestival.orglast_img read more

Richards feels the frustration

first_img Richards returned to action in City’s victory over Wigan in midweek after six months on the sidelines with a knee injury. During his arduous road to recovery he has not only seen the outstanding Pablo Zabaleta firmly establish himself as first-choice right-back, but City’s grip on the Barclays Premier League crown has all but been relinquished. The 24-year-old said: “It has definitely been frustrating, especially when you see United top of the league. After last season I thought we would have kicked on and maybe been a bit better, maybe retained it. We haven’t done that but I think next season we will regroup and hopefully we will get it back.” Manchester City defender Micah Richards admits it has been doubly frustrating to sit on the sidelines and watch Manchester United march towards title glory. Richards went down injured in a victory over Swansea last October, which in itself had been just the fourth game of a comeback from an ankle problem. It has been the most testing time for a player who has been beset by niggling problems in the past but he accepts he must now bide his time behind Zabaleta. The City youth product said: “Five-and-a-half, six months – it is quite frustrating to be out so long. When I came back I was playing really well. Now Zaba has been class this season. It is going to be hard to get back in but you know what football is like, one minute you are in and the next you are out. When I am in I am going to have to take my chance.” Richards, after returning to training three weeks ago, came into the side as Zabaleta was rested after the exertions of last week’s derby defeat of United and Sunday’s FA Cup semi-final win over Chelsea. But with an important trip to Tottenham coming up this weekend, Richards expects Zabaleta to be restored as City further look to cement second place. He said: “I think Zaba is going to be back in after the way he has been playing but if I am called upon I will give 100 per cent. Last time after injury I almost tried to rush back. This time I don’t want to rush back. I want to take it steady and when I am called upon try to do a job. “For me it is just getting back, getting some minutes under my belt, just to play 80 minutes was enough for me for now. “I will just keep training, working hard, trying to get fitter and stronger. Hopefully I will get some more games before the end of the season.” center_img Press Associationlast_img read more

Liverpool hockey goes 0-2; C-NS tops Auburn

first_img Tags: C-NSice hockeyliverpool Recent events at Lysander Ice Arena have meant that Liverpool must play on the same rink as Baldwinsville, unlike seasons past where they had home games on two different rinks at the facility.Also, they would go head-to-head, doing so last Tuesday night in a game where the Warriors were unable to produce much against a stingy Bees defense in a 4-1 defeat.They had seen each other Dec. 6 and 7 during the Bobby Conklin Tournament, where Liverpool endured two long, hard-fought games that went to shootouts, losing to Syracuse but then defeating Fulton. Goals by Corbin Melie in the first two periods had Clinton in front 2-0, and despite Matt Gagnon taking a pass from Connor Boland and finding the net in the third period, Liverpool could not catch up.Melie tacked on a third goal to complete his hat trick. Otherwise, Gavin Buza, in the net to give Welch a breather, made 47 saves to keep the game close most of the way.On that same Friday night, Cicero-North Syracuse looked to break a three-game skid against Auburn – and did so, edging past the Maroons 3-2 at the Twin Rinks.Holden Sarosy’s pair of goals, along with a goal from Tyler Murray, proved enough for the Northstars, Carter Wisely and Devin Kellogg getting assists. Kaii Van Iuven made 19 saves.And now C-NS would get set to challenge Liverpool on Friday night, this after the Warriors hosted Fulton Tuesday and the Northstars went to Shove Park Wednesday to face West Genesee.Share this:FacebookTwitterLinkedInRedditComment on this Story center_img Here, the Warriors were kept off the board until the second period, when Marco Palumbo scored off a feed from Xavier Springer.Yet that could not keep B’ville from grabbing a 3-1 advantage. James Welch did all he could, recording 37 saves, but the Bees won as Matt Speelman had two goals and one assist, with Luke Hoskin adding a goal and two assists.It was Liverpool’s first regulation defeat of the season, and it looked to bounce back Friday at Clinton, but could not do so as that other group of Warriors prevailed 3-1.last_img read more

“Turbo” playing at the Wellington Regent Theater this weekend

first_imgMovies ahead at Regent Theater:Disney’s PlanesThe WolverinePacific Rim. Rated: PG, 1 hour, 36 minutes.Movie Synopsis: From the makers of Madagascar and Kung Fu Panda, Turbo is a high-velocity comedy about an underdog snail who kicks into overdrive when he miraculously attains the power of super-speed. But after making fast friends wit ha crew of streetwise, tricked-out es-car-goes, Turbo learns that no one succeeds on their own. So he puts his heart and shell on the line to help his pals achieve their dreams, before Turbo-charging his own impossible dream: winning the Indy 500. When: Friday at 2 p.m. and 7 p.m.; Saturday, 2 p.m and 7 p.m.; Sunday, 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. This week at the Regent Theater: “Turbo” (Movie trailer is below). center_img Rotten Tomatoes rating (movie critics collective approval ratings): 64%. Audience review: 71% approval. Close Forgot password? Please put in your email: Send me my password! Close message Login This blog post All blog posts Subscribe to this blog post’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Subscribe to this blog’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Follow the discussion Comments Logging you in… Close Login to IntenseDebate Or create an account Username or Email: Password: Forgot login? Cancel Login Close WordPress.com Username or Email: Password: Lost your password? Cancel Login Dashboard | Edit profile | Logout Logged in as Admin Options Disable comments for this page Save Settings You are about to flag this comment as being inappropriate. Please explain why you are flagging this comment in the text box below and submit your report. The blog admin will be notified. Thank you for your input. There are no comments posted yet. Be the first one! Post a new comment Enter text right here! Comment as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments Comments by IntenseDebate Enter text right here! Reply as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Cancel Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new commentslast_img read more