Agile for a Reason

first_imgOver the last year or so, I’ve had the opportunity to speak to a variety of groups and organizations. The focus has been on just ‘how’ we, at EMC, have piloted, rolled out, refined and ultimately embraced the concept of Agile Marketing.The questions frequently revolve around: How did you do it? What steps did you take? What did you encounter? What should my company do to adopt Agile Marketing?While I can answer those questions without much hesitation, it became clear to me that the real reason others have these questions is because they are struggling with the WHY. Why did we embark down this path?My short answer is always the same: It wasn’t just for fun!The push towards Agile, specifically in a marketing world, is not a function of simply trying something new or different for the sake of changing things up. If you have been in the mix, you already know the crush to produce materials, programs, activities and content is overwhelming. So the thought of change for the sake of change holds no water.Instead, it was really a question of understanding the new realities of the world around us and recognizing our core business challenges. It’s about a business environment where change is constant, but more importantly, the documented rate of change is off the charts. It’s about a way of life that has us all struggling with the amount of information that inundates our brains and our psyches every minute of every day.It’s about individuals attempting to understand the methods, modes and best practices while trying to keep up with a never-ending list of to-dos and requests. It’s about hard working managers trying to prioritize an ever- increasing amount of requests and demands. It’s about go-getters spending endless hours figuring out who to go to, at what point in time, and with what information in hand in order to successfully get their job done.THESE are the reasons for bringing Agile concepts to the marketing world. It’s really a case of adapt and change or be prepared to flounder, possibly sink or just embrace gridlock.We chose to ‘change’. A word and concept that does not always elicit cheers and excitement…change can be difficult. Any or all of us can claim to embrace change, and for some it’s easier than others, but it always presents a set of challenges no matter who you are.While our brains crave rhythm and consistency (in order to make room for all that new information) we sometimes have to force change upon ourselves. Many times, it boils down to short-term pain for the brain as a path to long-term gains.In this case it’s painful in the short term to rework our methodologies, but hugely valuable in the long run to improve the quality of our outputs. And that is exactly what we are doing in order to manage the lightning fast changes in our world and the overflow of information and requests we all face every day.For more insight into the ‘why Agile’ question and how EMC moved towards (and continually adapts) an agile marketing methodology, download our e-Book Agile Marketing: When Clear and Simple Processes Drive Innovation. It is now also available at both the Apple App Store and Google Play.last_img read more

WHO team in Wuhan says discussions open, meetings frank

first_imgWUHAN, China (AP) — World Health Organization investigators looking for clues into the origin of the coronavirus in the central Chinese city of Wuhan say the Chinese side has provided a high level of cooperation but caution against expecting immediate results from the visit. Along with the key Wuhan Institute of Virology, the WHO team that includes experts from 10 nations has visited hospitals, research institutes and a traditional market tied to the outbreak. Zoologist and team member Peter Daszak praised Wednesday’s meetings with staff at the Wuhan institute, including with its deputy director who worked with Daszak to track down the origins of SARS that originated in China and led to the 2003 outbreak.last_img read more

Minnesota Republicans counter Chauvin trial security plan

first_imgMINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Minnesota Senate Republicans have offered a counterproposal to Democratic Gov. Tim Walz’s request for security funding for next month’s murder trial for the former police officer charged with killing George Floyd. Instead of a $35 million fund, the Republican proposal would target Minneapolis by diverting local government aid from cities that fail to pay for mutual aid assistance. Republicans pushed back on the governor’s proposal, calling it a bailout for Minneapolis failing to adequately fund its police. The state is coordinating with federal authorities and more than 200 chief law enforcement agencies across the state for the March 8 trial.last_img read more