Meet Our Presenter for the February 14th Webinar “The Scoop on Gluten Free: Research and Practice Tips”

first_imgAmy Jones, M.S., R.D., L.DChief Clinical DietitianMary Rutan Hospital, Ohioby Krystle K. BinkowskiRegister for The Scoop on Gluten Free: Research and Practice Tips webinar Tuesday, February 14 at 11:00 am EST. RDN will earn 1.0 CPEUs.Amy Jones received her Master’s degree from Ball State in Nutrition after receiving her Bachelor’s degree from West Virginia Wesleyan College in Nutrition. She continued her education with training in Celiac Disease at the University of Chicago. Amy practices in community hospitals specializing in Celiac Disease. Currently she is on the chair for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics with dietitians in the Gluten Intolerance Disorders practice group. Amy founded Logan County Celiac Support group in 2010 and she enjoys speaking at regional and national celiac disease events. Some of these events include Nationwide Children’s Hospital Celiac Conference, ExpoWest, and the Gluten Free Allergen Free Fest.  Besides speaking at events, Amy Jones is also on the Gluten Free Living magazine’s dietetic advisory board. Through this role she continues to contribute her knowledge on this topic to the magazine. The Diabetes Spectrum has just recently accepted Amy’s Article on Celiac Disease for publication and she also was contributing author to another article published in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition.Tune in to learn more about Amy Jones and Celiac Disease by joining us for her webinar titled The Scoop on Gluten Free: Research and Practice Tips on Tuesday, February 14th, at 11:00 am ET. This was posted by Robin Allen, a member of the Military Families Learning Network (MFLN) Nutrition and Wellness team that aims to support the development of professionals working with military families.  Find out more about the MFLN Nutrition and Wellness concentration on our website, on Facebook, on Twitter, and LinkedIn.last_img read more

Budgeting Strategies That Work

first_imgBy Barbara O’Neill, Ph.D., CFP®, Rutgers Cooperative Extension, boneill@njaes.rutgers.eduA budget (a.k.a., spending plan) is a plan for spending future income and expenses, including setting aside savings for future financial goals. Ideally, a budget should be written (paper, computer spreadsheet, etc.) with specific categories of income, spending, and dollar amounts. Benefits of budgeting include providing “guardrails” for spending, achieving financial goals (if savings is included), and for peace of mind. https://pixabay.com/photos/shopping-spending-till-slip-879498/ Return to article. Long Descriptionstevepb/Pixabay.com, CC0Budgets project future income and expenses with a goal of achieving positive cash flow. Therefore, developing and following a budget requires a level of attention to detail (e.g., recording and adjusting expenses). Below are four recommendations to develop a budget that works:Define Your Income– Base a budget on average monthly take-home income. Multiply weekly pay by 4.3 to get a monthly amount. This accounts for “extra” income months (e.g., months with five Friday paydays).Pay Yourself First– Ask yourself if you can live on 80% to 90% of your income with 10% to 20% of income set aside for savings goals. The 20% amount is meant for long-term savings and includes tax-deferred retirement savings plan contributions. Savings is the most difficult “expense” to budget.Set Aside Reserves– Plan ahead for occasional expenses by setting aside money monthly for them. Examples include insurance premiums, home and car maintenance, pets, and property taxes if not escrowed.Follow the “2x Gas” Rule– Set aside twice the amount that you spend monthly on gas for car maintenance and repair expenses. Drivers who buy more gas put more “wear and tear” on their car. You will not have expenses every month, but when you do, the money will be there.Food is a major recurring expense in family budgets. It may not be the largest expense (dollar wise) compared to housing costs, income and property taxes, child care, and transportation, but people still spend a lot of money buying food. Below are seven smart ways to cut food costs to get your budget numbers to balance:Make a Shopping List– List items to buy and their approximate cost before you go food shopping. Then stick to the list. Include “miscellaneous” and a dollar amount (e.g., $5) so impulse buying is built in.Use Coupons Wisely- Redeem coupons from newspapers and online platforms, but only on products that you plan to buy anyway and only when the after-coupon cost is cheaper than alternative products.Search for Bargains– Look for marked down bakery items, meat/seafood, and other supermarket “clearance” foods. If the packaging is intact, it is generally safe to buy these foods if used immediately.Double (or Triple) Your Savings– Take advantage of double or triple the savings on manufacturer’s coupons and supermarkets that allow you to combine a store coupon and a manufacturer’s coupon.Join the Club- Sign up for supermarket “shoppers’ cards” that provide access to special sales promotions and/or an opportunity to earn points toward free or reduced price food items (e.g., a free Easter ham).Stock Up to Save– Buy (or grow in a home garden) fresh fruits and vegetables when they are in season and freeze, can, or dry them for use at a later date.Cut Up Your Own Food- The more preparation that a store does (e.g., cutting up stew beef, making meat and vegetable kabobs, and slicing fruit or making fruit salads), the more consumers generally need to pay.To prepare you own personalized budget, download this Spending Plan Worksheet from Rutgers Cooperative Extension that includes spaces to list income and fixed, variable, and occasional expenses.last_img read more

Gascutters help city burglars breach bank’s high security

first_imgBurglars broke into the Corporation Bank at Mayur Vihar-I in the early hours of Saturday in quite a novel way – they used a gascutter to first rip open the shutter and then slash the lock of the grill door.Luckily, they could not lay their hands on cash or other valuables.The incident came to light in the morning when the residents of Samachar Apartments were informed by the locals that the bank, located at the shopping centre near the apartment building, had been broken into.”A gascutter was used to break open the shutter as well as the lock. The burglars also tried to open the almirah containing cash, but were unable to do so. We have been told by the bank officials that nothing is missing from the spot,” a senior police officer said.He added: “We recovered the gas cylinder that was used to cut the lock. It looks like the cylinder stopped functioning after the robbers entered the bank, that’s why they failed to open the almirah and steal anything.” Investigating officials said there were quite a few CCTV cameras inside the bank but all, except one, were found switched off.The one CCTV captured only the blurred images of a few persons entering the bank, according to sources.A probe team reached the spot and collected fingerprints after the police were informed of the incident around 7.30 am.”We are questioning a security guard deployed at an ATM booth near the bank on whether he had seen suspicious elements nearby at night. The probe is on and we will interrogate local criminals as well,” the police officer said.advertisementFor more news on India, click here.For more news on Business, click here.For more news on Movies, click here.For more news on Sports, click here.last_img read more