Congress doesn’t want President’s rule in Maharashtra, says Ashok Chavan

first_imgThe Congress in Maharashtra on Sunday said it didn’t want President’s Rule in the State which is in the midst of a political crisis in view of the BJP’s announcement that it would not form government. Senior Congress leader Ashok Chavan said newly-elected MLAs of the party will seek advice from the party high-command over its future political stand in the State. “We are in Jaipur. We will discuss the issue here and will seek advice for the future political stand. The party doesn’t want president’s rule in the state,” he told reporters. Mr. Chavan said he was in favour of forming a stable government in Maharashtra.last_img read more

UFC obliging troubled Greg Hardy’s desire for 2nd chance

first_imgFILE – In this Sunday, Dec. 27, 2015, file photo, Dallas Cowboys defensive end Greg Hardy arrives prior to an NFL football game against the Buffalo Bills, in Orchard Park, N.Y. Former NFL defensive end Greg Hardy says he is “haunted” by his high-profile domestic violence past and wants to prove he has changed as he makes his debut in UFC, a promotion that hasn’t hesitated to embrace fighters with legal or drug problems. (AP Photo/Bill Wippert, File)NEW YORK — Greg Hardy’s eyes popped as he saw his name in bold print on the oversized placard that identified him as a UFC fighter.“That’s dope! It’s got my Twitter thing on it,” Hardy said with a laugh.ADVERTISEMENT Yes, his Twitter handle @greghardyjr was printed underneath his name to let fans know how to find the hulking heavyweight on social media. UFC enthusiasts and social media pundits had already pounced on the disgraced former NFL defensive end:— “he can beat up women that’s for sure.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSUrgent reply from Philippine ‍football chiefSPORTSWin or don’t eat: the Philippines’ poverty-driven, world-beating pool stars— “why is this woman beater in the UFC?”— “which woman fighter is he gonna beat up?” PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games PLAY LIST 02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss LOOK: Joyce Pring goes public with engagement to Juancho Triviño SEA Games hosting troubles anger Duterte Keep scrolling and scrolling and the majority of the 240-character sentiments strike similar opinions: Hardy doesn’t deserve a chance to fight for UFC.Hardy understands those who want to wash their hands of someone arrested for assaulting a woman. While still playing football, Hardy was convicted in July 2014 of assaulting and threatening a woman who contended the 6-foot-4, 275-pounder threw her in a bathtub and onto a sofa covered with guns before threatening to kill her. He appealed, and prosecutors in North Carolina eventually dismissed domestic violence charges in February 2015, saying the accuser in the case couldn’t be found. The court heard the woman had reached a civil settlement with Hardy.“I do revisit the past at night,” Hardy said Thursday. “I’m haunted and I am a broken man. But at the end of the day, I’ve got to build myself back up.”Hardy wants to show he has changed as he makes his debut in UFC, a promotion that hasn’t hesitated to embrace fighters with legal or drug problems. His co-headline spot in a heavyweight bout Saturday night comes at a key moment for the MMA giant, its first show in its $1.5-billion contract with ESPN.Hardy played 12 football games in 2015 under a $13.1 million deal with the Cowboys before turning to professional fighting, where his rise has been rapid. The 30-year-old breezed through six fights — none lasting past the first round — and won a contract through a UFC reality show.ADVERTISEMENT Is Luis Manzano planning to propose to Jessy Mendiola? “I felt like that was the right thing for me to do,” he said. “I totally get it. I understand why people would have a hard time grasping the whole situation and why things happen. But I believe everything happens for a reason. I believe we can change our surroundings for a positive thing.”Hardy has had few positives since he had 15 sacks for the Carolina Panthers in 2013 when he was picked for the Pro Bowl. He was arrested on a cocaine possession charge in a Dallas suburb in 2016.“I’ve grown in every way possible and the people around me have helped me do that,” Hardy said. “Everything’s changed as far as the sport, the venues and myself. Please keep watching and find out for yourself.”Hardy hopped down the stage after the ceremonial staredown against Allen Crowder and gave White a big bro hug.But not all observers backed UFC’s decision to sign Hardy.“It’s quite offensive. It’s gross,” said Kiersten Stewart, director of public policy at Futures Without Violence, a national group that works to prevent domestic and sexual violence and child abuse. “It’s about making money off domestic violence. It really minimizes the harm that domestic violence does.”Stewart said Ostovich had every right to fight at Barclays Center with Hardy, but raised the question: “Why was she put in this position?”White said it was a moot point.“These are two UFC fighters and eventually they would have ended up on the same card anyway,” White said. “It could be this fight or it could be 10 fights from now.”Win or lose, Ostovich knows she’ll end her combat in the cage in tears. She’s been publicly stoic in the face of probing questions about her abuse and Hardy’s presence and is ready to let her emotions out once the bell rings. Through all the adversity, there was nowhere else she wanted to be but New York. Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting MOST READ SEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completioncenter_img Jhack Tepora spearheads PH fighters in Pacquiao-Broner undercard Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. SEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completion LATEST STORIES TS Kammuri to enter PAR possibly a day after SEA Games opening His debut comes one month after UFC allowed Jon Jones to compete following a positive drug test, moving an entire fight from Las Vegas to Los Angeles because Nevada regulators wouldn’t license the troubled superstar. It’s also several months after Dana White, UFC’s president, condemned Conor McGregor for his criminal act of throwing a wheeled cart at a bus full of fighters, then turned around and used the video footage to hype up an October megafight between McGregor and Khabib Nurmagomedov, a bout that itself ended in a melee.Scrutiny of Hardy’s ascent grew among fans when he was placed on the same card as flyweight Rachael Ostovich, who is fighting Paige VanZant. Honolulu police arrested Ostovich’s husband, Arnold Berdon, who pleaded not guilty to attempted murder and is accused of punching his wife in the head, face and ribs, fracturing her eye socket.White has defended having the two intertwined fighters on the same card and said he had Ostovich’s approval to book Hardy.“From the minute I called her, there was never a situation,” White said. “She didn’t know who Hardy was. She didn’t know anything about it. She said, ‘His situation isn’t my situation. They’re completely different. I don’t even know the guy and I’ll have no problem with any of this.’”Ostovich said in New York that she talked to Hardy this week to “squash whatever might be happening.”“Let’s work together and use this to help other people from both sides,” she said. “It wasn’t bothering me. It was just something that was on my mind and on my heart that I wanted to go in and meet with him.”Hardy appreciated the chat.“She’s a phenomenal person,” he said. “It shows greatness that she went through what she went through and came here to kick butt.”Ostovich was pulled from her fight against VanZant because of the severity of the injuries suffered in her attack, only to insist she could compete as she saw other fighters clamor for the marquee spot.She had earned her spot in Brooklyn and, once medically cleared — she wanted to clear the slate with Hardy. LOOK: Joyce Pring goes public with engagement to Juancho Triviño View comments “If I was pulled from the card because of my situation and being at home just recovering and thinking about it, I would have been at home Saturday night watching my fight and just be so crushed,” she said. “It feels so much better to be here than not.”Hardy feels similarly about a new lease on life as an athlete. He was cheery — downright happy-go-lucky — and did not shy away from answering questions about his past, even as he was light on specifics.And he’s already made a great impression on the new boss.“The guy is gifted. He’s a great athlete. He looks good so far,” White said. “When he hits people, they go down.”Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Nextlast_img read more

A superconductor story with a twist

first_img Return to article. Long DescriptionRice University researchers used experiments and simulations to discovery small distortions in the lattice of an iron pnictide that becomes superconductive at ultracold temperatures. They suspect these distortions introduce pockets of superconductivity in the material above temperatures at which it becomes entirely superconductive. Illustration by Weiyi WangThe discovery reported this week in Nature Communications is the result of nearly two years of work by the Rice team and collaborators in the U.S., Germany and China.Dai and Nevidomskyy, both members of the Rice Center for Quantum Materials (RCQM), are interested in the fundamental processes that give rise to novel collective phenomena like superconductivity, which allows materials to transmit electrical current with no resistance.Scientists originally found superconductivity at ultracold temperatures that let atoms cooperate in ways that aren’t possible at room temperature. Even known “high-temperature” superconductors top out at 134 Kelvin at ambient pressure, equivalent to minus 218 degrees Fahrenheit.So if there’s any hope for widespread practical use of superconductivity, scientists have to find loopholes in the basic physics of how atoms and their constituents behave under a variety of conditions.That is what the Rice researchers have done with the iron pnictide, an “unconventional superconductor” of sodium, iron and arsenic, especially when doped with nickel.To make any material superconductive, it must be cooled. That sends it through three transitions: First, a structural phase transition that changes the lattice; second, a magnetic transition that appears to turn paramagnetic materials to antiferromagnets in which the atoms’ spins align in alternate directions; and third, the transition to superconductivity. Sometimes the first and second phases are nearly simultaneous, depending on the material.In most unconventional superconductors, each stage is critical to the next as electrons in the system begin to bind together in Cooper pairs, reaching peak correlation at a quantum critical point, the point at which magnetic order is suppressed and superconductivity appears. Share1NEWS RELEASEEditor’s note: Links to high-resolution images for download appear at the end of this release.David Ruth713-348-6327david@rice.eduMike Williams713-348-6728mikewilliams@rice.eduA superconductor story with a twistRice University physicists find surprising distortions in high-temperature superconductorsHOUSTON – (Aug. 7, 2018) – There’s a literal disturbance in the force that alters what physicists have long thought of as a characteristic of superconductivity, according to Rice University scientists.Rice physicists Pengcheng Dai and Andriy Nevidomskyy and their colleagues used simulations and neutron scattering experiments that show the atomic structure of materials to reveal tiny distortions of the crystal lattice in a so-called iron pnictide compound of sodium, iron, nickel and arsenic.These local distortions were observed among the otherwise symmetrical atomic order in the material at ultracold temperatures near the point of optimal superconductivity. They indicate researchers may have some wiggle room as they work to increase the temperature at which iron pnictides become superconductors. AddThis Return to article. Long DescriptionThese single crystals of nickel-doped compounds of sodium, iron and arsenic are like those used by Rice University researchers in experiments to determine the material’s superconductive properties at ultracold temperatures. They used simulations and precise neutron scattering experiments to show the presence of tiny lattice distortions near the optimal superconductivity of an iron pnictide compound.But in the pnictide superconductor, the researchers found the first transition is a little fuzzy, as some of the lattice took on a property known as a nematic phase. Nematic is drawn from the Greek word for “thread-like” and akin to the physics of liquid crystals that align in reaction to an outside force.The key to the material’s superconductivity seems to lie within a subtle property that is unique to iron pnictides: a structural transition in its crystal lattice, the ordered arrangement of its atoms, from tetragonal to orthorhombic. In a tetragonal crystal, the atoms are arranged like cubes that have been stretched in one direction. An orthorhombic structure is shaped like a brick.Sodium-iron-arsenic pnictide crystals are known to be tetragonal until cooled to a transition temperature that forces the lattice to become orthorhombic, a step toward superconductivity that appears at lower temperatures. But the Rice researchers were surprised to see anomalous orthorhombic regions well above that structural transition temperature. This occurred in samples that were minimally doped with nickel and persisted when the materials were over-doped, they reported.“In the tetragonal phase, the (square) A and B directions of the lattice are absolutely equal,” said Dai, who carried out neutron scattering experiments to characterize the material at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the National Institute of Standards and Technology Center for Neutron Research and the Research Neutron Source at the Heinz Maier-Leibnitz Center.“When you cool it down, it initially becomes orthorhombic, meaning the lattice spontaneously collapses in one axis, and yet there’s still no magnetic order. We found that by very precisely measuring this lattice parameter and its temperature dependence distortion, we were able to tell how the lattice changes as a function of temperature in the paramagnetic tetragonal regime.”They were surprised to see pockets of a superconducting nematic phase skewing the lattice towards the orthorhombic form even above the first transition.“The whole paper suggests there are local distortions that appear at a temperature at which the system, in principle, should be tetragonal,” Dai said. “These local distortions not only change as a function of temperature but actually ‘know’ about superconductivity. Then, their temperature dependence changes at optimum superconductivity, which suggests the system has a nematic quantum critical point, when local nematic phases are suppressed.“Basically, it tells you this nematic order is competing with superconductivity itself,” he said. “But then it suggests the nematic fluctuation may also help superconductivity, because it changes temperature dependence around optimum doping.”Being able to manipulate that point of optimum doping may give researchers better ability to design materials with novel and predictable properties.“The electronic nematic fluctuations grow very large in the vicinity of the quantum critical point, and they get pinned by local crystal imperfections and impurities, manifesting themselves in the local distortions that we measure,” said Nevidomskyy, who led the theoretical side of the investigation. “The most intriguing aspect is that superconductivity is strongest when this happens, suggesting that these nematic fluctuations are instrumental in its formation.”Co-lead authors of the paper are Rice graduate student Weiyi Wang and Yu Song, a former RCQM postdoctoral fellow in quantum materials at Rice and now a postdoctoral scholar at the University of California, Berkeley. Co-authors are graduate student Yu Li of Rice; Chongde Cao, a former visiting research scholar at Rice and now a professor at Northwestern Polytechnic University in Fremont, Calif.; Kuo-Feng Tseng and Thomas Keller of the Max Planck Institute; L.W. Harriger of the National Institute of Standards and Technology; Wei Tian and Songxue Chi of Oak Ridge National Laboratory; and Rong Yu of Renmin University, Beijing, China. Dai is a professor of physics and astronomy. Nevidomskyy is an associate professor of physics and astronomy.The research was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, the Robert A. Welch Foundation, the National Science Foundation, the National Science Foundation of China, the National Key Research and Development Program of China, the Shenzhen Science and Technology Program and the Shaanxi International Cooperation Program.-30-Read the open-access paper at http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-018-05529-2Follow Rice News and Media Relations via Twitter @RiceUNewsRelated materials:Pengcheng Dai Group: https://pdai.phys.rice.eduAndriy Nevidomskyy bio: http://rcqm.rice.edu/researchers/andriy-nevidomskyy/Rice Department of Physics and Astronomy: https://physics.rice.eduWiess School of Natural Sciences: https://naturalsciences.rice.eduImages for download: Return to article. Long Description Rice University researchers used experiments and simulations to discovery small distortions in the lattice of an iron pnictide that becomes superconductive at ultracold temperatures. They suspect these distortions introduce pockets of superconductivity in the material above temperatures at which it becomes entirely superconductive. (Credit: Illustration by Weiyi Wang/Rice University) These single crystals of nickel-doped compounds of sodium, iron and arsenic are like those used by Rice University researchers in experiments to determine the material’s superconductive properties at ultracold temperatures. They used simulations and precise neutron scattering experiments to show the presence of tiny lattice distortions near the optimal superconductivity of an iron pnictide compound. (Credit: Rice University)center_img http://news.rice.edu/files/2018/08/0813_SUPERCONDUCTIVITY-1-WEB-1qp3nx7.jpgRice University researchers used experiments and simulations to discovery small distortions in the lattice of an iron pnictide that becomes superconductive at ultracold temperatures. They suspect these distortions introduce pockets of superconductivity in the material above temperatures at which it becomes entirely superconductive. (Credit: Illustration by Weiyi Wang/Rice University) These single crystals of nickel-doped compounds of sodium, iron and arsenic are like those used by Rice University researchers in experiments to determine the material’s superconductive properties at ultracold temperatures. They used simulations and precise neutron scattering experiments to show the presence of tiny lattice distortions near the optimal superconductivity of an iron pnictide compound. (Credit: Rice University) Return to article. Long Description Rice University researchers used experiments and simulations to discovery small distortions in the lattice of an iron pnictide that becomes superconductive at ultracold temperatures. They suspect these distortions introduce pockets of superconductivity in the material above temperatures at which it becomes entirely superconductive. (Credit: Illustration by Weiyi Wang/Rice University) http://news.rice.edu/files/2018/08/0813_SUPERCONDUCTIVITY-2-WEB-26dz09l.jpgThese single crystals of nickel-doped compounds of sodium, iron and arsenic are like those used by Rice University researchers in experiments to determine the material’s superconductive properties at ultracold temperatures. They used simulations and precise neutron scattering experiments to show the presence of tiny lattice distortions near the optimal superconductivity of an iron pnictide compound. (Credit: Rice University)Located on a 300-acre forested campus in Houston, Rice University is consistently ranked among the nation’s top 20 universities by U.S. News & World Report. Rice has highly respected schools of Architecture, Business, Continuing Studies, Engineering, Humanities, Music, Natural Sciences and Social Sciences and is home to the Baker Institute for Public Policy. With 3,970 undergraduates and 2,934 graduate students, Rice’s undergraduate student-to-faculty ratio is just under 6-to-1. Its residential college system builds close-knit communities and lifelong friendships, just one reason why Rice is ranked No. 1 for lots of race/class interaction and No. 2 for quality of life by the Princeton Review. Rice is also rated as a best value among private universities by Kiplinger’s Personal Finance. To read “What they’re saying about Rice,” go to http://tinyurl.com/RiceUniversityoverview.last_img read more