Business Cloud Computing: Privacy Is Just As Important As Security

first_imgluke burns Tags:#cloud computing#enterprise#privacy#saas#security How Intelligent Data Addresses the Chasm in Cloud Related Posts Cloud Hosting for WordPress: Why Everyone is Mo…center_img Serverless Backups: Viable Data Protection for … Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Guest author Luke Burns is a partner at Ascent Venture Partners.Security and privacy are often mentioned in the same breath, but when it comes to cloud computing, security tends to be the dominant subject. But should it be? While there are seemingly endless security threats, cloud providers are becoming increasingly sophisticated and capable in addressing them.When it comes to privacy, though, cloud vendors have not made the same progress. In fact, it’s more than likely that Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) companies breach the customer’s perception of data privacy regularly.I’m not referring simply to consumer companies and their problems with privacy, e.g. Facebook sharing personal data with advertisers. Enterprise SaaS companies face their own unique challenges around customer data usage, even though those issues have not received the same level of scrutiny.Enterprise Services Know A Lot About Their CustomersThe challenging aspects of SaaS privacy arise from the close relationship between vendor and customer – a situation vastly different than in days of on-premise software. As the name suggests, SaaS vendors provide a service, and with that service comes the ability to log every keystroke and mouse click that a customer makes using their software.Why would a SaaS vendor do that?Think about customer relationship management (CRM) software as an example. What would you think if your CRM took note every time you updated a contact, and then made that updated contact information available to other users with that same business connection? Sounds like a pretty useful service for customers, doesn’t it?What Are Your Expectations For Data Privacy?But does it breach your expectation of data privacy? SaaS opens up the door to increased interaction and partnership between a customer and a vendor, but it also opens the door for misuse.One particularly interesting area with privacy concerns is the use of the metadata (data about the data). Let’s say, for example, there is a clear agreement that all data is owned by the customer and can’t be used by the vendor. But would that agreement also include things like the number of users (salespeople) actively using a CRM system or the number of new sales leads entered in a given quarter or the number of meetings booked?This type of data could yield tremendous insight to an individual trying to gauge sales activity at a given company or within a given sector. Would use of this metadata be covered under data ownership or could the SaaS vendor sell those insights to the highest bidder with a clear conscience?Then there’s obfuscated or anonymized data. Is it OK for a SaaS provider to use your data to create unattributed market statistics? Imagine a financial SaaS vendor that could create a composite view of all the private companies using its system and publish average earnings growth over various periods of time. Or a customer-service SaaS vendor that could create benchmarks on average time to close a trouble ticket. In each case, the vendor is producing valuable data points it can use for profit. Should there be any type of reimbursement for customers, or is it just a cost of doing business?Who Owns The Intellectual Property?Many SaaS platforms offer robust tools to customize the experience for individual customers and companies. These customizations often reflect significant investment in design and development and sometimes reflect proprietary business processes. How much exposure to these customizations does a SaaS vendor have? Could it use these customizations as templates for future product enhancements that might be offered to competitors of the customers that originally created them?We’re just scratching the surface of potential privacy issues that can arise with SaaS vendor relationships.Don’t get me wrong; I’m not saying companies should avoid SaaS. In fact, I think the benefits of embracing software in the cloud far outweigh the potential risks. The close relationship developed between a SaaS vendor and its customers has the potential to deliver significant payback, especially for companies embracing SaaS not for cost savings, but for business transformation.But both sides of that equation, the vendor and the customer, need to fully understand the bargain and the trade-offs made between privacy and business value.Asking The Tough Privacy QuestionsSimilar to their IT security due diligence, companies need to ask questions about the privacy of their data before they enter into a cloud vendor relationship.Who owns the data? How many copies of the data are there? How can you ensure that data is erased or unreadable in the event that a customer chooses to decommission or change service providers? And especially, What is the vendor’s acceptable use of a company’s cloud-based data?Hopefully, better awareness and transparency about these issues will build trust and help business-facing cloud vendors avoid the lawsuits that have afflicted their consumer-facing cousins.last_img read more

Munaf Patel is spinning the ball these days: Roberts

first_imgWest Indian fast bowling legend Andy Roberts is baffled as to why young Indian pacers suddenly lose speed after showing early promise and start “spinning the ball”, pointing out Munaf Patel as the most recent example.India pacer Munaf Patel has lost speed according to legendry West Indian fast bowler Andy Roberts. AP”When Munaf Patel came here in 2006, he had some pace,” said Roberts wryly, “Now he is spinning the ball.”Roberts was speaking from his experience of having worked with Irfan Pathan briefly during the 2006 tour by the Indians after the then coach Greg Chappell requested him to look at the left-arm seamer’s problems.”You have to remember this happens only once they make it to international stage. Maybe they are better off without these coaches.”These coaches turn you into line-and-length bowler. Not what you naturally are. These boys then lose their ability.”Roberts, who picked up 202 wickets from 47 Tests at 25.61 average, is hailed as the father of fearsome West Indian fast bowlers of 70s and 80s. He certainly is not impressed by the fast bowling in world cricket presently.”Shaun Tait throws his arm. Dale Steyn, whom I like, also occasionally throws his arm. Less said about the West Indian pacemen the better. The likes of Kemar Roach, Jerome Taylor and Fidel Edwards are not running in fast enough at the batsmen,” he said.”They saw Curtly Ambrose run in smoothly and ping the ball. But he could do it because he was so very strong. Others must run in hard in their run-ups.advertisement”There are two ways to bowl fast. Either you steam in or you have a lot of strength to bowl even if you are relaxed in your run-up,” Roberts explained.Roberts is dismissive of the notion that today’s cricketers play a great volume of cricket.”Too much cricket? They play mostly Twenty20s and one-dayers. It’s 4 or 10 overs a match.”He also sought to correct the notion that reverse swing almost exclusively was the preserve of the Pakistani bowlers in the 90s.”We began the reverse swing. When Pakistanis came here in 1977 they were surprised to see us do it. It’s no rocket science, you keep the ball polished on one side and it would reverse swing. For it to happen, the other side must have a bit of moisture on it.Inevitably, Roberts is asked to compare who he thought was better between Sachin Tendulkar and Sunny Gavaskar.”Sachin is one of the game’s greats. No questions about it. However, you judge a batsman on how he handled the best of pacemen and best of spinners of his era.”In the 70s, West Indies had the quick ones. England had a very good spinner in Derek Underwood. And Sunny always did well against them.”Nobody was said to have a more deceptive bouncer than Roberts in the game. Gavaskar has mentioned he had two bouncers — one a slower one with which he set a batsman up and the other a quicker one which a batter could only see as a blur.”You can’t bowl 95 mph all the time and hope a batsman would surrender. They get used to it after a while. You need to vary the pace, the angle, the seam or swing,” Roberts said.”I could bowl everything: seam, swing, pace, slower one, bouncer, cutters, everything.”Asked to pick the favourite batsman and fast bowlers of his era, Roberts said, “Viv Richards to me was the best player of short-pitched bowling ever.”I liked Dennis Lillee, Jeff Thomson, Malcolm Marshall. Imran (Khan) was a great bowler but he wasn’t an out-and-out fast bowler. Same was the case with Richard Hadlee.”Like most of his era, Roberts can’t see the revival of West Indian cricket any soon.”The top brass needs a kick in the back side. Presently our cricket is flat on its back. The board at one time had 18 directors.”I was once told by a director that I could become a coach if I had a level 2 or 3 coaching certificate. The same man asked me to come to Trinidad and give a lecture on fast bowling in his academy. The knowledge is with me. But I can’t be going around asking for work,” he said.- With inputs from PTIlast_img read more

Yukon jail hit with human rights complaint over access to Aboriginal programs

first_imgAPTN National NewsWhen Whitehorse’s new minimum security jail opened last year, programs for First Nations were said to be a top priority.Most inmates in the Yukon jail are Aboriginal and today the facility does have services in place.One inmate facing trial, however, has launched a human rights complaint against the jail alleging he has no access to Aboriginal programming.APTN National News reporter Shirley McLean has this story.last_img