Survival of the Nicest

first_imgBaboons monitored for personality did best if they fell in the “Nice” category.Science Now put up a headline that would have surprised Darwin: “For Some Primates, Survival of the Nicest.”  Three evolutionists watched 45 baboons for 7 years and classified their behaviors based on their grunts, and their hormones from droppings.We identified three relatively stable personality dimensions, each characterized by a distinct suite of behaviors that were not redundant with dominance rank or the availability of kin. Females scoring high on the “Nice” dimension were friendly to all females and often grunted to lower-ranking females to signal benign intent. “Aloof” females were aggressive, less friendly, and grunted primarily to higher-ranking females. “Loner” females were often alone, relatively unfriendly, and also grunted most often to higher-ranking females. Aloof and Loner females were rarely approached by others. Personality dimensions were correlated in different ways with three measures previously shown to be associated with fitness: stress levels and two behavioral indices reflecting the closeness of dyadic bonds formed by individuals. Females who scored high on Nice had high composite sociality indices (CSI) and stable partner preferences, whereas females who scored high on Aloof had lower CSI scores but significantly more stable partner preferences. Loner females had significantly lower CSI scores, less stable partner preferences, and significantly higher glucocorticoid levels.  (Seyfarth, Silk, and Cheney, “Variation in personality and fitness in wild female baboons,”  PNAS, 73/pnas.1210780109 PNAS October 1, 2012.) This finding seems to contradict over a century and a half of Darwinian thinking.  “By being a nice baboon, you increase the likelihood of having strong social bonds, which in turn translates to a better chance of passing on your genes,” Live Science wrote in “It pays to be a nice baboon.”  Actually, the experiment found both Nice and Aloof females doing about the same in terms of reproductive fitness.  The only losers were the loners.  Whatever the findings say about evolution appears ambivalent: “It remains to be determined which of the Nice or Aloof personality dimensions is more adaptive, or whether variation is maintained by contrasting effects on fitness.”Survival of the nicest.  Good grief.  All those genocides for nothing.This is silly.  Did the researchers watch the baboons 24 x 7 for seven years?  Maybe the baboons did all their selfish Darwinian antics when the researchers were asleep and on vacation.  Why didn’t they watch the males?  Are they sexist?  We can’t let these so-called scientists get away with rewriting history by using bogus categories.  Even Science Now, supposedly a functionary of that bastion of Darwinism, the AAAS, said, “Females who scored high on the ‘nice’ meter were friendly to all females.”  How do you calibrate a nice meter?  How do you measure friendliness?  What is that, in Darwin terms?No, we can’t let evolutionists get away with this.  Too much is at stake.  Darwin’s reputation must be preserved intact.  The triumph of German militarism and Russian conquest must maintain its scientific justification on true Darwinism.  Eugenics must not be undermined by those ID people.  No more Mr. Nice Baboon.  Give me survival of the fittest, and give me death! (Visited 20 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Nicholas Hlobo: art as dialogue

first_img10 November 2008Nicholas Hlobo, winner of the Standard Bank Young Artist Award for Visual Arts 2009, is gaining an international reputation for his experimental use of materials to “create conversations” around issues of masculinity, gender, race and ethnicity.Hlobo is showcased on the Michael Stevenson Gallery website, where he explains his relationship with the material he uses: “I always find that the material tends to dominate the entire process. My ideas evolve in unexpected ways as the material helps me discover new things.“The start usually seems like trying to roll a rock as large as a double-decker bus, and by the completion of the work I go, ‘Wow, I can’t believe I went through that and came back sane’.”In 2007 Hlobo exhibited Umdodo at the Aardklop National Arts Festival in Potchefstroom. During the same year he took Umakadenethwa engenadyasi to the Galeria Extraspazio in Rome and idiom[s] to the Savannah College of Art Design in Georgia, USA.In 2008, he exhibited at the Boston ICA as part of the Momentum Series, and his work is included in the third Guangzhou Triennial in China, which runs until 9 November. His exhibition Flow was on at the Studio Museum in Harlem, New York, and Home Lands – Land Marks was on at Haunch of Venison in London. Kwatsityw’iziko was also on at the Michael Stevenson Gallery in Cape Town.Hlobo has also exhibited with various other artists, some of his more recent group exhibitions being Skin-to-skin at the Standard Bank Gallery in Johannesburg and .za: giovane arte dal Sudafrica at the Palazzo delle Papesse in Siena, Italy.In 2006 he won the Tollman Award for Visual Art.Hlobo chooses his material strategically, and often challenges stereotypes of sexual identity through his work.In an interview with Sue Williamson, he explained: “Through my works I attempt to create conversations that explore certain issues within my culture as a South African.“The conversations become a way of questioning people’s perceptions around issues of masculinity, gender, race and ethnicity.”The annual Standard bank Young Artist Awards were started in 1981 by the National Arts Festival, Grahamstown, with Standard Bank coming on board as a sponsor in 1984.The awards, seen as one of the most prestigious of their kind in the country, honour young South African artists who have not yet gained widespread national exposure or acclaim, but who are making a significant mark in their field.The awards recognize and actively promote the talent of these young artists, providing them with financial support and a platform for experimentation. Winners receive a cash prize and financial support for their participation on the main programme of the National Arts Festival, Grahamstown.Source: National Arts Festival, Grahamstownlast_img read more

Marijuana legalization petition rejected

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The Ohio Attorney General’s Office rejected the petition for a proposed amendment to the Ohio Constitution to legalize marijuana in Ohio.On April 9, the Ohio Attorney General’s Office received a written petition to amend the Ohio Constitution, titled the “Marijuana Rights and Regulations Amendment” from the attorney representing the petitioning committee. The summary was rejected for several reasons, including:The summary language giving the General Assembly authority to regulate “marijuana commerce” does not accurately reflect the actual amendment language.The summary omits references in the amendment that “Marijuana businesses shall be lawful only in those voting precincts in which the majority of the voters approved this section.”The summary omits references in the amendment that “The General Assembly shall within 240 days after the effective date enact and enable laws, rules, and regulations consistent with this section.”“For these reasons, I am unable to certify the summary as a fair and truthful statement of the proposed amendment,” Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine stated in his letter rejecting the petition. “However, I must caution that this letter is not intended to represent an exhaustive list of all defects in the submitted summary.”In order for a constitutional amendment to proceed, an initial petition containing summary language of the amendment and 1,000 signatures from Ohio registered voters must be submitted to the Ohio Attorney General. Once the summary language and initial signatures are certified, the Ohio Ballot Board would determine if the amendment contains a single issue or multiple issues. The petitioners must then collect signatures for each issue from registered voters in each of 44 of Ohio’s 88 counties, equal to 5% of the total vote cast in the county for the office of governor at the last gubernatorial election. Total signatures collected statewide must also equal 10% of the total vote cast for the office of governor at the last gubernatorial election.last_img read more

Centre, State finding new ways to eject foreigners: Himanta Biswa Sarma

first_imgAssam Finance and Health Minister Himanta Biswa Sarma said the Centre and the State governments have been discussing new ways to eject foreigners after the “disappointment” with the National Register of Citizens (NRC).The final NRC published on Friday excluded 19,06,657 people from a total of 3.29 crore applicants. The excluded people are not technically foreigners, as they have legal options to challenge their status.“I don’t think this is the final list. There are many more to come,” Mr. Sarma said, adding that efforts were on to explore ways to ferret out more foreigners from the State.Assam’s indigenous people believe there are at 40 lakh foreigners or illegal immigrants in the State. The July 2009 petition in the Supreme Court that triggered the exercise claimed the State had 41 lakh foreigners.Mr. Sarma did not specify the measures being discussed, but one of the ways is believed to push the Citizenship (Amendment) Bill to let the allegedly persecuted non-Muslims from India’s neighbourhood – Afghanistan, Bangladesh and Pakistan – be absorbed as citizens.The final NRC exclusion list is believed to contain the names of many Hindu Bengali people, the BJP’s vote bank. The party has been unhappy with the final NRC. 19 lakh people left out of Assam’s NRC Final List. What next?Volume 90%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard ShortcutsPlay/PauseSPACEIncrease Volume↑Decrease Volume↓Seek Forward→Seek Backward←Captions On/OffcFullscreen/Exit FullscreenfMute/UnmutemSeek %0-9Live00:0001:5001:50 Watch | Assam’s NRC Final List is outlast_img read more