Planetary Eruptions

first_imgEruptions can come in two types: literal and figurative.  Some planetary bodies are literally erupting.  Others are causing figurative eruptions in theories.  Here are some recent news stories about planets, moons, comets and other objects circling our sun and other stars.  There hasn’t been much news from Mercury or Venus this month, so we’ll start on the home planet and work outward. Earth volcanoes:  Earth is busting out all over.  You can watch the fireworks going on at Mt. Etna on this BBC News video clip.  Live Science has a video of the hottest, deepest volcano on earth, found underwater near Fiji.  New Scientist resurrected the “heretical” view that the dinosaurs were killed by lava, not a meteor; two giant blobs of mantle that erupted onto the surface. One geologist remarked, “This will be controversial – it flies in the face of much of the research from the last 30 years.”  Wynne Perry at Live Science (see MSNBC) entertained the entertaining question, “Did a methane burp clear the way for the dinosaurs?”  Over at Science Daily, the idea was presented that much of earth’s surface was formed from ancient flood basalts, “giant lava eruptions that coat large swaths of land or ocean floor” periodically.  Incidentally, geologists are not sure where Earth’s internal heat comes from, especially since Japan’s KamLAND antineutrino detector came up short (see Science Daily).  “One thing we can say with near certainty is that radioactive decay alone is not enough to account for Earth’s heat energy,” remarked Stuart Freedman of Lawrence Berkeley National Lab.  “Whether the rest is primordial heat or comes from some other source is an unanswered question.” Moon volcanoes:  A region of volcanism was found on the back side of the moon.  Most of the volcanic evidence, the maria, is on the near side, but in the middle of the cratered regions on the far side, reported PhysOrg, “a small volcanic province created by the upwelling of silicic magma” was reported by remote sensing of chemical clues by the Lunar Prospector.  “The unusual location of the province and the surprising composition of the lava that formed it offer tantalizing clues to the Moon’s thermal history.” Mars volcanoes:  A Texas geologist is pouring lava on hopes for life on Mars by resurrecting a “heretical”  view that most of Martian history was created by lava, not water.  According to PhysOrg, David Leverington (Texas Tech) argues that slippery, low-viscosity lavas mimicked the action of water, carving the channels and basins that so tantalize astrobiologists. “If Leverington is right, the odds of life on Mars plummet to near zero,” because Mars would have been bone dry most of its history.  “But that’s a big ‘if’,” the article cautioned. Arguments on both sides of the debate were presented.  JPL’s next Mars rover Curiosity, scheduled for launch this fall, has a target for its August 2012 landing: Gale Crater, which is thought to have had liquid water in the past (Live Science).  Mission scientists, who love to look for water with visions of life, are probably hoping Leverington is wrong. Vesta geology: JPL’s DAWN spacecraft arrived in orbit at the giant asteroid Vesta on July 17.  It’s too early for science results, but the BBC News posted some of the best early images of the colorful, crater-packed surface.  Jupiter moon mysteries:  Live Science posted a review of “The Greatest Mysteries of Jupiter’s Moons” by Adam Hadhazy.  He presented the traditional tidal-flexing model of Io’s volcanism, but then admitted that tidal forces alone “might not account for all this oomph.”  The Juno spacecraft, readying for its launch in August, may make Io a prime target for study.  News media like PhysOrg and the Los Angeles Times have been exaggerating its capabilities as if one mission could “find the recipe for planet-making.” Titan volcanoes:  Out at the Saturn system, the source of Titan’s atmosphere is still a puzzle.  New Scientist said that planetologists are still unsure whether material has erupted onto the giant moon’s surface and replenished the methane which otherwise would be gone within 15 million years (a third of 1% the assumed age of the moon).  The article by Jeff Hecht reviews the findings and mysteries of this major enigmatic body of the solar system. Enceladus showers:  Saturn is feeling the eruptions from its little geysering moon Enceladus.  That surprising announcement came from the news room of the Herschel Space Observatory, a mission of the European Space Agency.  “Enceladus rains water onto Saturn,” PhysOrg said; New Scientist headlined, “Moon-showers give Saturn an aquatic belt.”  The infrared instrument on the orbiting telescope was able to detect the water and estimate that 5 percent of the eruptive water vapor (250 kg per second) “falls on Saturn where it collects to form a ring extending five times the width of the planet.”  This process is “unique to Saturn,” PhysOrg said.  The water belt extends out 10 Saturn radii and is one Saturn radius thick.  What happens to the other 95 percent?  “Although most of the water from Enceladus is lost into space, freezes on the rings or perhaps falls onto Saturn’s other moons, the small fraction that does fall into the planet is sufficient to explain the water observed in its upper atmosphere.” Pluto moon:  The Pluto system has added a child: Hubble discovered another small moon, bringing the family to four moons and a parent “dwarf planet” as Pluto is now labeled (PhysOrg).  Space.com quoted Alan Stern, principal investigator of the New Horizons spacecraft slated to swing by Pluto in July 2015. “This is a whole new kind of planet,” he said.  “It’s going to blow our doors off.”  One door ready to be blown is the dynamical problem of how such a small body could have four objects in orbit around it for billions of years. Comet eruptions:  A “theory eruption” has taken place regarding comets.  Sample returns and remote sensing has established that some cometary material formed at high temperatures, contrary to decades of assumptions.  PhysOrg presented work by European researchers who came up with a model employing “photophoresis,” that assumes material from the hottest parts of the inner solar system got cooked sunny side up.  The difference in temperature on the two sides of a particle leads to migration, they say, conveying the cooked material outward by sunlight pressure, where it became incorporated into comets.  “This novel physical explanation could account for the position of certain dust rings observed in protoplanetary disks and thus shed light on the conditions of planet formation,” they said.  Whether the model works if the grains rotate was not clear from the article.  Comet Hartley 2 is a real-world comet that made the news on PhysOrg.  Its tail includes particles as large as golf balls. Extrasolar planets:  Space.com is dabbling in the occult.  Its article, “How to keep lonely planets snug: just add dark matter” calls on mysterious unknown stuff to warm up lonely exoplanets wandering through the darkness of space.  Neither isolated planets nor dark matter have ever been observed, but the author quoted an astrobiologist who went even further into speculation, imagining life on such worlds subsisting off the internal heat from imaginary dark matter interactions with the imaginary planets. On his blog The Procrustean, physicist Rob Sheldon told a personal story of his friend’s quest to measure the solar wind.  It led to the Genesis mission, which found that the oxygen isotope ratios differ between the solar wind and earth, leading to the conclusion that Laplace, inventor of the nebular hypothesis, was wrong – not only in his physics, but his metaphysics (compared to Newton’s).  Tied into the discussion was Cornelius Hunter’s recent philosophical entry on his blog Darwin’s God about Laplace, Kant, Darwin, and god-of-the gaps hypotheses. We are very fortunate to live in an age of exceptional discoveries in astronomy.  We are less fortunate to live in a time of incorrigible materialism, when our science representatives spend reckless drafts on the bank of time to a point where we face an international debt crisis that is unlikely to be paid back, even with higher taxing of credulity.(Visited 47 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

The keys to high yields in 2015

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Some corn and soybean yields in Ohio did well better than others, but what was the differentiating factors? Was it planting date? Tillage? Traits? DuPont Pioneer Field Agronomist Kyle Poling goes over corn and soybean performance for 2015 in this week’s DuPont Pioneer Field Report.last_img

NoSQL Graph Database Neo4j Community Edition Now Available Under GPL

first_imgNeo Technology, the sponsor company of the graph database Neo4j, has released the Community Edition of Neo4j under a GNU General Public License (GPL). Previously, it was available under the Affero General Public License. “That means that in every scenario where you can use MySQL for free, you can now also use Neo4j Community for free,” writes Neo Technology co-founder Emil Eifrem on his blog.According to Wikipedia, the Affero General Public License was “designed to close a perceived application service provider “loophole” (the “ASP loophole”) in the ordinary GPL, whereby using but not distributing the software, the copyleft provisions are not triggered.” What this should mean in practice is that companies will now be able to provide hosted services based on Neo4j without open-sourcing code modifications or paying for the commercial version of Neo4j (Disclaimer: This does not constitute legal advice. Please consult your legal counsel if you have questions regarding open source licenses.)Interest in graph databases in general, and Neo4j in particular, has been growing for the year. Eifrem writes “Some developers found the Neo4j license too restrictive, preventing their teams from using Neo4j.” Eifrem believes this new, less restrictive license will spur more growth in the graph database sector.“Since the graph data model is the richest of all the NOSQL data models, graph databases have the opportunity to be the most useful for most people in most situations, and ultimately grab the largest slice of the NOSQL market,” Eifrem writes. Related Posts klint finley Tags:#Big Data#hack Growing Phone Scams: 5 Tips To Avoidcenter_img 7 Types of Video that will Make a Massive Impac… How to Write a Welcome Email to New Employees? Why You Love Online Quizzeslast_img read more

Kelly wary of ‘legend’ Boku in return fight to ONE

first_imgRobredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games Kotetsu Boku is five years Kelly’s senior and has done what the Filipino hasn’tand that is to win the ONE World featherweight title.“Boku’s a legend, he’s a veteran fighter so come Saturday I’ll be wary of him,” said Kelly in Filipino Thursday at his hotel room in Holiday Inn. “Boku is a skillful fighter, but with his age he might tire faster than me.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSWin or don’t eat: the Philippines’ poverty-driven, world-beating pool stars“We all know that when you age, you get winded quicker unlike those younger fighters and I think my training regimen in Baguio will give me the advantage in stamina against Boku.”Kelly, though, has been dormant for the past year after losing Narantungalag Jadambaa and he’s eager to erase his previous disappointments once he takes on Boku (25-11-2). Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ Eric Kelly talks to the media at his hotel room ahead of his ONE Championship fight against Kotetsu Boku on Saturday at Cotai Arena.MACAU—Eric Kelly has built himself an impressive mixed martial arts resume going 12-3 in his professional career and is often regarded as one of the most experienced Filipino fighters.And yet there is still someone who’s more seasoned than the 35-year-old from Baguio City.ADVERTISEMENT Robredo should’ve resigned as drug czar after lack of trust issue – Panelo View comments National Coffee Research Development and Extension Center brews the 2nd National Coffee Education Congress Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ Tara Borlain, Juan Baniqued eye fitting end to IronKids stint MOST READ Trump strips away truth with hunky topless photo tweet His loss against Jadambaa was his second straight, third overall, and going up against Boku is a task Kelly does not take lightly.“Well I hope I can do my best against Boku, I’ve prepared for him well,” said Kelly who doesn’t train under one stable. “I want to prove that even though there are younger fighters than I am I can still proudly represent the Philippines in MMA.”Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next FEU Auditorium’s 70th year celebrated with FEU Theater Guild’s ‘The Dreamweavers’ Church, environmentalists ask DENR to revoke ECC of Quezon province coal plant DILG, PNP back suspension of classes during SEA Games LATEST STORIESlast_img read more

We gave up a lot Chief of most northern Ontario community hates

first_imgFORT SEVERN, Ont. – Paul Burke is chief of the 463-strong Fort Severn First Nation, Ontario’s most northerly community, which is located near the mouth of the Severn River as it empties into Hudson Bay. Burke, 42, opened up in a recent interview about life in the remote community.Tell me a bit about yourself?My father was a Scot who worked for the Hudson Bay company, my mother was Cree. I got hit on both sides from both worlds. I was sent to a Catholic high school of 3,000 students in London, Ont. That’s a lot for a kid to take. I used to be a heavy equipment operator and a carpenter before that.How do you envisage the future for the younger internet generation in Fort Severn?Kids nowadays operate on a New York minute. It’s gotta be now. They want what’s out there. The hard truth is we can’t have that, just because of where we are. I see their frustration. But there is an advantage to the new technology in that we can now do lots of jobs from home, even in Fort Severn. There’s nothing wrong with Fort Severn. There’s nothing wrong with living out here.What do you say to those Canadians who complain Indigenous people freeload off their taxes?Screw you, buddy. We gave up a lot, and it wasn’t voluntarily either. We wouldn’t live in houses like that if we actually had our fair share. It’s just like crumbs from the table. ‘Here you go and shut up.’ (But) people have no idea what goes on. Urbanites have no idea about daily life here. All the negative things overshadow all of the good things. You don’t hear the success stories.You are adamant that Indigenous people in communities such as Fort Severn need to become self-sustaining. Why?All the communities are stuck in a rut. I hate the idea of standing with your hand out. I want to break that dependency. You can’t make a long-term plan if you’re asking for money all the time. We know what our problems are, let us fix them ourselves. That’s how you fix the ‘Indian problem.’ The mentality is changing out there. I want to capitalize on that.Do you think you’re succeeding?My aim as chief is to impose financial discipline and make decisions for the entire community. The proportion of people on social assistance here is the lowest ever. I’m trying to ensure at least one or two earners per family. Our $2.5-million solar project is about 40 per cent complete. Fort Severn is capable of leading a project of this scale. My goal is to make our generators go quiet. I also want to encourage small-scale eco-tourism: groups of six to eight people, maybe 30 groups a year.The interview has been edited and condensed.last_img read more

Rethinking The NFLs Rooney Rule For More Diversity At The Top

As word spread quickly in January 2007 that Mike Tomlin would be the next head coach of the Pittsburgh Steelers, no one needed to explain the significance of the move to Steve Jackson. Then a safeties coach with the Washington Redskins, Jackson was among the many African-American assistants rooting for Tomlin to get the job. Just a few years earlier, Tomlin, who had just completed his first season as the Minnesota Vikings’ defensive coordinator, probably wouldn’t have been on the short list for one of the most prestigious coaching gigs in professional sports. But under the Rooney Rule, times were changing.“For me, that’s the one that really stood out,” said Jackson, now the Tennessee Titans’ assistant secondary coach. “It was the Steelers. That’s one of those jobs that everyone looks at. And he wasn’t the leading candidate when he walked in for the interview, but he got in that room and he made his case. That’s what we all want: just to have a real chance to compete for the job. A lot of us [black coaches] looked at that and said, ‘Yeah.’”There’s no debating that the Rooney Rule has had a positive impact on the NFL. By providing owners with the first leaguewide tool to make hiring potentially more inclusive, the NFL took a significant step toward changing its culture. The rule continues to be expanded, and major corporations have followed the league’s lead. But in a workplace in which the overwhelming majority of players are African-American, the NFL has many more opportunities to strengthen the rule and further increase diversity in its management ranks.In place since 2003 for head coaches and expanded in 2009 to include general manager jobs and equivalent front-office positions, the rule — named after Dan Rooney, Pittsburgh Steelers chairman and onetime head of the league’s diversity committee — mandates that an NFL team must interview at least one minority candidate for these jobs. The rule, however, has two fatal flaws: the temptation to substitute sham interviews in place of a search for real diversity, and coordinator-level positions, a crucial step to head-coaching jobs, are not under the umbrella.The NFL did recently expand the rule again to include women: For all executive openings in the commissioner’s office, a woman must be interviewed. The San Francisco 49ers were the first team to formally adopt the practice, but the same flaws still apply.But the league did provide a blueprint for corporate America to improve its poor hiring record when it comes to diversity. Facebook, Pinterest, Intel, Xerox and Amazon are among the major companies that have instituted their own version of the rule. Even the Pentagon has explored using some form of the rule to diversify its officer corps.“The Rooney Rule really has become the best practice for diversity and inclusion,” said Robert Gulliver, the NFL’s executive vice president of human resources and chief diversity officer. “The Rooney Rule is all about access and opportunity, and it’s exciting to see where we are now after having the Rooney Rule in place for 12 years when you look at what the Rooney Rule has delivered.”In the 12 seasons before the rule was instituted, the NFL had only six non-white head coaches. In 12 seasons under the rule, the league has added 14 head coaches of color. From the NFL’s standpoint, there were other encouraging numbers last season regarding diversity. The Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sports at the University of Central Florida found that:At the start of last season, there were six head coaches of color, one more than in 2014. In 2011, the NFL had an all-time high of eight head coaches of color.There were seven African-American general managers in 2015 and for the ninth consecutive year, there were at least five general managers of color.Eight of the last 18 Super Bowl teams have had either an African-American head coach or general manager.Clearly, minorities have made modest strides in filling leadership positions. The problem is, there are 32 NFL teams. Even at its highest point, minority representation among coaches was a meager 25 percent. Almost 68 percent of the NFL’s players are African-American, but there are no African-American team presidents, and only one team president of color. Although the NFL received an A grade for overall racial-hiring practices from Central Florida, only 19.4 percent of the league’s professional positions — front-office and business-operations personnel — were filled by “people of color” in 2015. The numbers tell the story: There’s still plenty of work to do.Jeremi Duru wrote the book on the Rooney Rule. Literally. In Advancing The Ball: Race, Reformation, and the Quest for Equal Coaching Opportunity in the NFL, Duru masterfully details the history of the process that resulted in the rule. Duru, a law professor at American University’s Washington College of Law, agrees that the rule is not perfect, but “the whole idea of it is to prompt kind of a culture change in the league,” he said. “It’s not that the outcome of each particular interviewing season is going to vindicate the rule, but rather that the rule will put in place the sense that, in order to be the best, you have to think broadly. It’s the idea that in order to succeed and be competitive, you have to look at a deep pool of candidates.”One of the biggest criticisms of the rule is that it hasn’t effected change fast enough. For the rule to have been in place so long, some African-American commentators have argued, the NFL should have many more minorities in the highest-ranking positions. “It’s extremely difficult to eradicate a long-standing problem quickly,” Duru said. “The Emancipation Proclamation itself isn’t going to be a panacea. But it creates a culture where there’s no longer lawful slavery, and where we start to see progress, slowly but surely.“In the end in the NFL, hopefully, the idea is that it really becomes clear that the best coaches come from all sorts of different places. And if you think broadly about coaching and you slow down and take time with your hire, you’re going to find yourself with the best outcome. It’s not a consequence of the rule itself, but of the culture that the rule has ushered in.”Unfortunately for the NFL, the public perception is that sham interviews are integral to the league’s culture. Invariably each season, rumors have swirled that some teams interviewed African-American candidates only to comply with the rule. In January, the timing and execution of the Philadelphia Eagles’ hiring of new coach Doug Pederson raised questions about whether they had violated the spirit of the rule. The Eagles interviewed Duce Staley, a former Philadelphia player and current assistant coach on the team. Staley had never been a coordinator and only served as a position coach for three seasons. To many league observers, it appeared the Eagles had skirted the rule by interviewing an in-house candidate who obviously lacked the experience to be a head coach.That’s where the Fritz Pollard Alliance comes in. Together with the league’s front office, they determine whether a team’s interview process is legitimate. In the first year of the rule, commissioner Roger Goodell’s predecessor, Paul Tagliabue, fined former Detroit Lions general manager Matt Millen $200,000 for “failing to discharge his duties” under the rule.Although the specter of fines should serve as a deterrent to teams violating the rule, there’s another step the league could take to ensure compliance besides the removal of draft picks: require teams to provide transcripts of interviews with minority candidates. That way, the Fritz Pollard Alliance and the commissioner’s office could judge for themselves whether teams adhered to the spirit of the rule.“The Rooney Rule requires that there be a meaningful interview of a person of color, not just an interview,” Duru said. “Any mechanism that can be used to ensure an interview that is meaningful should be on the table.”However, among NFL decision-makers, there’s no momentum for detailed transcripts to become part of the process. “What is important is getting interview feedback,” the NFL’s Gulliver said. “We really do find that getting feedback, getting candidate feedback, on what worked and what didn’t work, and what can even be better the next time, will help candidates as they continue their quests to become a head coach or a general manager.”That being said, covering more potential candidates under the rule would seem to be a logical next step. Generally, coordinators have the most responsibility among assistant coaches. Owners often pluck coordinators from successful teams to become head coaches. If there were more minority coordinators in the pipeline, theoretically, there would be more minorities in the applicant pool for head coaching positions. The Rooney Rule does nothing to address that basic fact.In response to the NFL’s horrible hiring record after the 2012 season (eight head coaches and seven general managers were fired; 15 white guys were hired), the Fritz Pollard Alliance proposed that coordinator-level and team president positions should be covered under the rule. The NFL rejected the proposal, but in 2013 the league did restart the Career Development Symposium, which previously ran from 1998-2008.The commissioner’s office requested that teams send two representatives, including at least one person of color, who aspire to be general managers and head coaches, to a three-day program at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. Besides networking with decision-makers from throughout the league, participants honed their interview skills through presentations and panel discussions. (In March, the league had its first Women’s Career Development Symposium.)But remember: Last season, the league had only six head coaches of color and seven African-American general managers. Obviously, the Career Development Symposium didn’t hobble efforts to improve minority hiring — but how much did it help? It just seems that including coordinator positions under the rule could be another major turning point in the ongoing struggle to level the playing field.In ESPN The Magazine’s Feb. 8 Super Bowl 50 Issue, senior writer Mina Kimes wrote that white position coaches and assistants are more than twice as likely to be promoted to coordinator than their African-American counterparts, according to research from professors at Georgetown, George Washington, Emory and Iowa State University. Moreover, those promotions occur regardless of the white coaches’ performance, experience and coaching background. The data shouldn’t be ignored.The Titans’ Jackson is a 13-year NFL assistant. Despite his experience, Jackson knows it’s downright impossible to make the leap from an assistant coach to a head coach without first being a coordinator.“There’s always a network, an inner circle, and then there are others,” he said. “And if you’re in the others, you have to do everything you can to get in the door.”The argument against expanding the rule to include coordinator positions is that head coaches should be allowed to pick their staffs without any restrictions on interviewing. There may be something to that.During the 2007 and 2008 seasons, Brian Stewart directed the Dallas Cowboys’ defense. If coordinators are covered under the rule, Stewart envisions the potential for conflict. “That would be rough,” said Stewart, now a college coach at Nebraska who works with defensive backs. “You really have to leave picking those guys [coordinators] to the head coaches. They have to be allowed to choose their own people.“That’s one of the benefits of reaching the level of head coach. And if you don’t let them interview only the guys they want to interview, it could really open up a can of worms when you talk about relationships on the staff. If guys feel like a coordinator didn’t get the job the right way, there could be a lot of resentment from all the other assistants. It could be a problem. It could be a big problem.”Of course, there’s often resistance to change. When the rule was instituted, many within the league suggested head coaches wouldn’t have credibility if they were hired as a result of the process. But who would argue that great coaches such as Hall of Famer Tony Dungy, Tomlin and Carolina Panthers’ Ron Rivera lack credibility? The Steelers’ pick of Tomlin worked out spectacularly.The Rooney Rule is still evolving and growing pains are part of the process. But with the NFL on the right track, it’s definitely not time to slow down. Editor’s note: Tuesday was opening day at The Undefeated, a new ESPN website that explores the intersections of race, sports and culture. In an introductory letter, Kevin Merida, its editor-in-chief, says the site won’t shrink from covering challenging subjects with a mix of original reporting, innovative storytelling, provocative commentary, must-see video, narratives and investigations. At FiveThirtyEight, we’re so excited at having a new sibling that we’ve been running several of The Undefeated’s articles on our site this week — including the one that follows here — and we have big plans for partnerships in the future. More stories from The Undefeated:Serena: The embodiment of it all by LZ GrandersonDon’t believe the fairy-tale mythology that sports promote by Domonique FoxworthWill my 2-year-old nephew end up like Michael Brown? by Wendi Thomas read more

Surging Michigan up next for Ohio State in Big Ten Tournament

INDIANAPOLIS — After sneaking past Northwestern, 67-61, in overtime Friday in the second round of the Big Ten Tournament, the Ohio State men’s basketball team will play Michigan on Saturday. The Buckeyes needed an Evan Turner buzzer-beater from just inside halfcourt to top the Wolverines in the 2010 tournament. With the No. 4-seeded Wolverines’ (20-12) 60-55 win against Illinois on Friday, Michigan coach John Beilein said his team is playing its best basketball late in the season. After a 1-6 start to Big Ten play, Michigan put together an 8-3 record down the stretch to finish 9-9 in conference play. The Wolverines were able to close the season strong because of improved play from their young players. Michigan starts two freshmen and one sophomore. That sophomore, guard Darius Morris, leads the Wolverines in scoring and assists with 15.1 and 6.8, respectively. That assist mark tops the Big Ten. OSU point guard Aaron Craft likely would be the primary defender of Morris. The freshman said he is looking forward to the opportunity. “Defense is something I’ve definitely taken pride in over the years,” he said. “I definitely enjoy the challenge.” Morris had 17 points and seven assists against Illinois. Freshman guard Tim Hardaway Jr. and redshirt freshman forward Jordan Morgan are next in scoring for the Wolverines, with 13.8 and 9.5 points per game, respectively. OSU freshman forward Jared Sullinger said he knows how he will approach the talented, young Michigan squad. “It’s the Big Ten,” he said. “This is where you’ve got to be physical, especially in the Big Ten Tournament.” The Buckeyes took home victories in both matchups with Michigan this season, with a 68-64 win Jan. 12 in Ann Arbor, Mich., and a 62-53 victory Feb. 3 at home. OSU junior guard William Buford topped all Buckeye scorers in the teams’ first meeting, with 19 points. Sullinger put up 19 of his own in the second meeting with the Wolverines, to go along with 15 rebounds. But, the Buckeyes are looking forward, not back. “We have a game tomorrow,” Sullinger said, “and that’s really where our focus is at.” Michigan would all but assure an at-large bid in the NCAA Tournament with a victory against No. 1 OSU. If OSU shoots like it did against Northwestern, it may make that victory more likely. The Buckeyes tied a season low by connecting on just 32 percent of their shots from the floor against the Wildcats. “Hopefully we shoot the ball a little better tomorrow,” Matta said. Though shooting may be a concern, the fact that four players — Sullinger, Craft, senior guard Jon Diebler and fifth-year senior forward David Lighty — played 40 minutes or more against the Wildcats does not seem to be. “I don’t think it affects us at all,” Lighty said. “We’ve been through it before, last year and even the year before that. It’s just us coming out and continuing to do what we do.” The Buckeyes will face the Wolverines at 1:40 p.m. Saturday at Conseco Fieldhouse in Indianapolis. read more

BMV investigation shows no wrongdoings OSU halts own probe

After the Ohio Bureau of Motor Vehicles concluded its investigation of car purchases made by Ohio State athletes and found that all purchases were legitimate, OSU has canceled its own investigation. According to the BMV’s 65-page report released Tuesday, which examined purchases from the Jack Maxton Chevrolet and Auto Direct dealerships in Columbus, there was “no evidence” to suggest wrongdoing by the dealerships or OSU players. “In light of the report from the BMV and an examination done by the Ohio Independent Automobile Dealers Association, we have seen no evidence that would lead us to believe that Ohio State student athletes violated any policies when purchasing used cars,” OSU spokesman Jim Lynch wrote in an email to The Lantern. “Therefore, we will not be conducting an independent examination outside of what has already been done by these parties.” The report cited that all 25 transactions were legitimate; however, no OSU officials were referenced in the BMV report. In a separate investigation released Tuesday, James R. Mitchell, the executive director of Ohio Independent Automobile Dealers Association, said that each of the 25 cars in question were sold at “fair market value.” “It is my professional opinion in regards to the sales transactions regarding (OSU) student athletes and their family members that there was no preferential treatment,” he wrote in a letter. The BMV’s investigation found that the automobile titles for the cars in question accurately reflected the actual purchase prices of the cars. The report also said there was no evidence of players providing memorabilia or tickets to the dealerships in place of cash. The Columbus Dispatch originally reported OSU’s plan to investigate car sales on May 7. Terrelle Pryor, who was connected to the use of at least six different cars during his time at OSU, departed the university on June 7 to pursue an NFL career. Thomas Bradley contributed to this story. read more

Parma target a surprise move for Crouch

first_imgThe newly-promoted Serie A side Parma have reportedly targetted a surprise move for Stoke City striker Peter Crouch, claims CalciomercatoThree years on after declaring bankruptcy and being dropped down the pyramid, Parma have successfully climbed back up to the top tier of Italian football.The Gialloblu are hoping to strengthen their attacking options for next season and have now reportedly set their sights on Crouch.Jadon Sancho, Borussia DortmundCrouch: Liverpool could beat Man United to Jadon Sancho Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Peter Crouch wouldn’t be surprised to see Jadon Sancho end up at Liverpool one day instead of his long-term pursuers Manchester United.While the former England international is now 37 years old, he did finish as Stoke’s top scorer in the 2017/18 season.Crouch currently has just one year remaining on his current deal at the relegated side and is believed to be tempted by the prospect of a move away from the Bet365 stadium this summer rather than playing a year of Championship football.Since being promoted from Serie B last month, Parma have already added the likes of Fabio Ceravolo, Jacopo Dezi and Riccardo Gagliolo to their ranks.last_img read more

Cavani keen on extending PSG stay

first_imgEdinson Cavani is keen on seeing out his current contract with Paris Saint-Germain after ruling out a return to Napoli before 2020.Cavani admitted staying with the Ligue 1 champions was his primary objective amid strong speculations linking him with a second spell at Napoli.“Right now, I’m playing towards the end of my contract and possibly my career,” the 31-year-old told Football Italia via L’Equipe.Opinion: Neymar needs to apologize to PSG’s supporters Tomás Pavel Ibarra Meda – September 14, 2019 After such a dramatic summer during the transfer window, Neymar truly needs to apologize to all the PSG supporters this weekend.When Neymar finished last…“I’ll be 33 going on 34 when it’s up. I don’t know if I’ll continue after 2020 and if my next contract will be in Paris, but I feel good here and I want to see my contract out.”The recent news would be like music to the ears of PSG fans who adore the Uruguayan star as they bid to land their first ever Champions League trophy.PSG were paired with the much improved Red Devils in the round of 16 and the tie is set to be explosive considering United’s current excellent form under caretaker boss Solskjaer.last_img read more