Another avian flu case likely in Indonesia

first_imgDec 20, 2005 (CIDRAP News) – Laboratory tests in Indonesia indicated that an 8-year-old boy who died Dec 15 had avian influenza, making him potentially the country’s 11th victim of the disease, Indonesian officials reported yesterday.The local test results were awaiting confirmation by a World Health Organization (WHO) reference lab in Hong Kong, Hariadi Wibisono of the Indonesian health ministry told Bloomberg News.Indonesian officials also were still waiting for confirmation of local tests indicating that a 39-year-old man who died Dec 13 had avian flu.The boy came from the Utan Kayu area on the east side of Jakarta, where a case had previously occurred in a 16-year-old girl who died last month, the Bloomberg story said.In other developments, two more poultry outbreaks of H5 flu have been reported in Romania in the past few days. The country’s 18th and 19th outbreaks were reported in poultry in the towns of Marsilieni and Chichinetu, both in the southeast, according to Agence France-Presse (AFP) reports.More than 100,000 poultry in Romania have been destroyed to contain the virus since the first outbreak there was discovered on Oct 7, AFP reported.In neighboring Ukraine, agriculture officials said yesterday that a British lab had confirmed that avian flu outbreaks in 15 villages involved the H5N1 virus, according to a Bloomberg News story.Health officials have seized and destroyed more than 63,000 poultry since the virus was first detected in Ukraine, the story said.In South Korea, a newspaper said the government had found traces of avian flu in about 50 places during an investigation from Oct 1 to Dec 11, according to another Bloomberg report.The newspaper, called Dong-a Ilbo, said the government found evidence of avian flu in eight regions, including an H5 virus in the western city of Ansan. The report said the government has promised to disclose findings of any H5 or H7 virus, according to Bloomberg.In Ethiopia, tests indicate that hundreds of pigeons that died earlier this month succumbed to Newcastle disease, not avian flu, according to an AFP report published today.Hundreds of pigeons died in eastern Ethiopia and in the capital, Addis Ababa, earlier this month. Ethiopian veterinary officials and Egyptian experts tested 62 dead and sick pigeons and also some healthy migratory birds, officials told AFP.All the tests were negative for flu, but the dead birds had Newcastle disease, officials said.Migratory birds from the Rift Valley region were included in the testing, the story said. It is feared that birds escaping the European winter and flocking in the Rift Valley may spread avian flu to Africa.In Beijing today, a US official praised China for cooperating with the United States on research on avian flu, according to a Reuters report.”There is a definite willingness to be completely cooperative, be completely transparent and to exchange samples with the WHO and with other partners so we can track the genetic changes,” Elias Zerhouni, director of the US National Institutes of Health, told reporters.Zerhouni favorably contrasted China’s present cooperativeness with its lack of openness early in the SARS outbreak, Reuters reported.The WHO confirmed that China has agreed to share avian flu viral isolates from human patients, the story said. WHO spokeswoman Maria Cheng said a Chinese official presented a draft agreement to the WHO in Beijing today.A report by the Chinese news agency Xinhua said Chinese officials handed over viral isolates from human cases to Shigeru Omi of the WHO today.last_img read more

Other Sports IAAF ban on Russian athletes over state-sponsored doping remains

first_imgDoha: The IAAF said that it will maintain its ban on Russian athletes over doping that it imposed in 2015, following a council meeting of top officials in Qatar. Rune Andersen, head of the doping task force for the International Association of Athletics Federations, said two issues remained unresolved — the examination of data received from the Moscow anti-doping laboratory and the issue of outstanding costs being sought from Russia because of the scandal. “Two key issues remain outstanding,” said Andersen at a press conference in Doha. “These need to be resolved.” He also said his task force was looking into claims that coaches from the discredited Russian athletics regime were still involved in the sport which, Andersen said, “run counter to assurances” received from Moscow. Asked if this latest extension of the ban meant Russian athletes would not be able to compete under the flag at this year’s world championships in Doha in September and October, Andersen said there was still time but conditions “have to be met” by Russia. IAAF head Sebastian Coe refused to be drawn on whether Russia had time to enter the worlds, saying he didn’t “want to speculate” on the country’s chances.  For all the Latest Sports News News, Other Sports News, Download News Nation Android and iOS Mobile Apps. A dozen Russian athletes were suspended in February over doping.Many Russian athletes are allowed to compete under a neutral banner.IAAF suspended Russia in November 2015 after the eruption of a vast state-sponsored doping scandal.center_img “Let’s see where this process takes us. And then make whatever adjustments we might need to,” Coe said in a conference call with reporters. “At the moment it’s important we don’t start speculating. It will be dependent on the recommendations given by the task force.” Doping fallout Responding to the IAAF’s concerns, Russian Sports Minister Pavel Kolobkov insisted that any coach found to have been involved in doping was barred from working with the national team. “The coaches and the athletes who have been banned for doping are automatically excluded from the national squad participants’ list,” Kolobkov said. Dmitry Shlyakhtin, the head of the All-Russian Athletics Federation, said the claims about the coaches and the issue of the payment of outstanding debts would be discussed at a meeting with Andersen later this monnth. “I’m confident that we will find the solution that will settle the situation,” he added. The IAAF suspended Russia in November 2015 after the eruption of a vast state-sponsored doping scandal. The decision to keep the ban in place was the 10th time the IAAF has turned down Russia’s appeal for reinstatement, having requested the same assurances when it upheld the ban in December. A team from the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) gained access to the Moscow laboratory at the centre of the scandal in January and officials are working their way through the mass of data recovered. Although the International Biathlon Federation still excludes Russia, the IAAF is the last of the high-profile international sports bodies to ban athletes from competing under the Russian flag, although many Russians are allowed to compete under a neutral banner. The International Olympic Committee lifted their suspension of the Russian Olympic Committee a year ago and WADA reinstated Russia in September. Russia’s Paralympic ban was lifted in early February. The fallout from the scandal continues. A dozen more Russian athletes were suspended on February 1 based on the revelations of the McLaren report on the doping scandal. The 12 included high jumper Ivan Ukhov who was stripped of his 2012 Olympic gold.  last_img read more