Dolly Parton: Singer, Songwriter, Pandemic Savior?

first_imgShe wrote “I Will Always Love You” and “Jolene” on the same day and built a theme park around herself. She has given memorable onscreen performances as a wisecracking hairstylist and harassed secretary. She even helped bring about the creation of “Buffy the Vampire Slayer.”Now, Dolly Parton’s fans are crediting her with saving the world from the coronavirus. It’s an exaggerated, tongue-in-cheek claim, to be sure. But for legions of admirers, Ms. Parton’s donation this spring to Vanderbilt University Medical Center, which worked with the drugmaker Moderna to develop a coronavirus vaccine, was another example of how the singer’s generosity and philanthropy have made her one of the world’s most beloved artists.- Advertisement – “Shakespeare may have written King Lear during the plague, but Dolly Parton funded a Covid vaccine, dropped a Christmas album and a Christmas special,” the author Lyz Lenz said on Twitter.In April, Ms. Parton announced that she had donated $1 million to Vanderbilt after her friend Dr. Naji Abumrad, a professor of surgery at the university, in Nashville, told her about the work researchers were doing to come up with a vaccine. Dr. Abumrad’s son, Jad Abumrad, is the creator of “Radiolab” and host of the podcast “Dolly Parton’s America.”last_img read more

County to trim advisory boards

first_imgAt the Feb. 7 Board of Clark County Commissioners meeting, giddy members of the Aging Readiness Task Force celebrated the approval of the Clark County Aging Readiness Plan and encouraged commissioners to let them form a Clark County Commission on Aging.Buoyed by their work on the task force, the volunteers wanted to keep doing their part to help implement a plan for accommodating the “silver tsunami” of Baby Boomers.Sure! commissioners said. Why not? The county already has a youth commission, Commissioner Steve Stuart said. Why not a commission for non-youth?On Feb. 8, commissioners heard one reason why not.During a work session on the county’s “reconfiguration” efforts to bring revenues in line with expenses, commissioners were reminded that while enthusiastic volunteers might want to put in their time for free, there’s still a cost.Environmental Services Director Kevin Gray and Karen Streeter, an Environmental Services manager, gave a presentation titled: “Evaluating Functionality and Effectiveness of Commissions, Advisory Boards and Technical Advisory Committees.”Gray and Streeter are on a team of eight county employees tasked to identify regulatory processes that, if adjusted, could save the county significant money.last_img read more

Costa Ricas relationship with Nicaragua is complicated says Solís

first_imgReunión con el Senador Rubio. pic.twitter.com/1IoEk8GReG— Luis Guillermo Solís (@luisguillermosr) June 12, 2014 Llegamos al Capitolio. pic.twitter.com/NnDIgUIsox— Luis Guillermo Solís (@luisguillermosr) June 12, 2014 CNN’s del Rincón seemed to reference Nicaragua’s President Daniel Ortega when he asked Solís if he wanted to grant himself expanded powers, including abolishing term limits. Ortega’s political party passed a constitutional reform ending term limits in 2013 that allowed the former guerrilla to run for office for a third term.“Power is ephemeral,” Solís said. “A mature democracy, like Costa Rica’s, … has sufficient human capital to look for this change [in power] after this term. I’m a president who recognizes the limits of power as a desirable frontier for institutions.”“Costa Rica and Nicaragua are countries that have no cause for divorce,” Solís told del Rincón, despite several border disputes pending between the Central American neighbors in the International Court of Justice at The Hague.“We have a complicated relationship but we always need to administer it with wisdom and for the benefit of our peoples,” the president said. Facebook Comments President Luis Guillermo Solís ended his whirlwind foreign tour of the United States Friday after meeting with U.S. senators, representatives from the Organization of American States, members of the news media and potential investors. The president released a statement Friday saying that the Costa Rican delegation considered the trip a success.Solís appeared to make a victory lap from Palo Alto to New York to Washington, D.C., buoyed by news that Intel would open a new quality control testing facility in Costa Rica. The news stoked hopes of continued investment in Costa Rica from the microchip maker, which is likely the small country’s most important foreign investor.But the president touched on other items during his first trip to the U.S. after taking office on May 8, including some constitutional amendments he would like to see, and Tico-Nicaragua relations.In an interview with Fernando del Rincón of CNN en Español’s “Conclusiones” Thursday, the president said he would like to see an amendment that recognizes Costa Rica as a “pluricultural” and multilingual country. Solís, who traces his ancestry to Jamaica through a black grandmother, said that Costa Rica has long minimized its afro-descendent and indigenous peoples.The leader also said that he wanted to see amendments that guarantee access to potable drinking water and broadband Internet access. Solís did not specify a timeline for these reforms.One item that was not on his legislative wish list was legalization of illicit drugs. Solís reiterated that he does not support legalizing marijuana as Uruguay has or Guatemalan President Otto Pérez Molina suggested in years past.“Costa Rica, unlike Guatemala, cannot yet discuss the subject of drug legalization. We believe that this is something that does not agree with our country in a moment when we are openly combating drug trafficking,” the president said, in a similar response to the one he gave The Tico Times earlier in Washington, D.C.Recommended: Solís outlines plans for Costa Rica in first Washington appearance as presidentSolís, however, said he did not oppose more debate on the subject.“I do not contemplate a model [of drug legalization] like Uruguay,” the president told CNN.In an interview with Voice of America on Friday, Solís said he supported expanding relationships with China but added that his government was in a process of reevaluating contracts with the economic giant that were approved under the Chinchilla administration. Solís said some agreements were approved without sufficient transparency, including improvements to Route 32 between Limón and San José.Solís told VOA that he rejected the crackdown on Venezuelan opposition parties. The president came under fire as a candidate for what some saw as a weak response to the violence.“The problems of democracy can only be solved with more democracy as Thomas Jefferson said,” Solís said. “Affirmation of human rights regimes should be maintained and deepened throughout the hemisphere.”Besides meeting with the media and investors, Solís traveled to the U.S. Capitol Thursday for a meeting with members of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, including Republican Senator Marco Rubio from Florida:center_img Related posts:Regulatory hurdles, inexperience contribute to China-Costa Rica trade imbalance President Solís calls for more trade, not just handouts from China Costa Rica, China to explore creation of ‘special economic zones’ Costa Rica hopes Chinese tourists will think pura vida for their next vacation En este momento grabo entrevista con @fdelrincon para el programa #Conclusiones por @CNNEE que se transmitirá mañana. pic.twitter.com/XZNcNvnvfs— Luis Guillermo Solís (@luisguillermosr) June 11, 2014last_img read more