Avian flu blamed in another Indonesian death

first_imgMay 1, 2006 (CIDRAP News) – An Indonesian man whose death was attributed to H5N1 avian influenza will bring Indonesia’s death toll from the virus to 25, if his case is confirmed outside the country.The man reportedly had come into contact with his neighbor’s infected chickens in Tangerang, 25 miles west of Jakarta, according to a CNN.com story on Apr 28.Samples from the man tested positive for H5N1 in an Indonesian laboratory, the Associated Press (AP) reported. Confirmatory testing is under way at a World Health Organization (WHO) reference lab in Hong Kong.The WHO has confirmed 32 human cases, with 24 deaths, from H5N1 in Indonesia.Elsewhere, the Wall Street Journal Asia said on Apr 27 that local health officials in China had failed to report possible human cases of avian flu to the central government, according to an Apr 29 Reuters report. The same issue has been raised elsewhere.But the Chinese government denied the allegation. “The release of information has been timely, open and transparent,” Health Ministry spokesman Mao Qun’an told Reuters.In addition, Chinese officials involved with tracking and stemming the spread of the virus among birds have established a quarantine zone in the Qinghai region in north-central China, according to BBC News online. A wild goose found dead in the region tested positive for H5N1.The virus so far has not been found in domestic poultry around Qinghai, according to an AP story today.The region is a major stopover point for migratory birds, and thousands of migratory birds died in an H5N1 outbreak at the Qinghai Lake wildlife sanctuary last year. The H5N1 virus later found in two people in Turkey was virtually identical to bird samples obtained in Qinghai, according to a statement in the AP story attributed to the WHO.last_img read more

Swiss scientists regain access to some EU grants through 2016

first_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Email Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country BRUSSELS—Starting today, scientists in Switzerland will again be able to apply for some research funds from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 program—including coveted grants from the European Research Council (ERC). Both sides reached a short-term deal undoing restrictions imposed on Swiss scientists after a referendum to curb mass immigration back in February.Scientists were the first to feel the cooling of the relationships between the European Union and the affluent country it surrounds after the referendum. The union expects Switzerland to include Croatia, which entered the union last year, in its agreement on the free movement of persons. But following the vote, Switzerland said it couldn’t sign the Croatian deal. As a result, Switzerland lost its privileged status as an associated country to Horizon 2020, the bloc’s research funding program.After several months of negotiations, the commission has now agreed to give Switzerland its associated country status back for the so-called first pillar of Horizon 2020, worth €24.4 billion for 7 years. This includes individual grants from ERC and the Marie Curie fellowships for science training, staff exchanges and mobility, as well as the Future and Emerging Technologies scheme, which is showering two 10-year projects with up to €1 billion each. (One of them, a controversial plan to model the human brain, is the brainchild of Henry Markram, a researcher at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne.)center_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe But Swiss researchers will still be considered third-country applicants for most of Horizon 2020, including its €29.7 billion third pillar, which funds collaborative research projects to solve “societal challenges.” The deal doesn’t affect restrictions on the education program Erasmus+ either.Researchers in Switzerland heaved a cautious sigh of relief at the news. But Dominique Arlettaz, vice president of the Rectors’ Conference of the Swiss Universities, pointed out that the deal is only partial and temporary. “We don’t know at all what will happen after [2016]. You know that research is done with a long-term vision so it’s difficult not to know what will happen from 2017 on,” Arlettaz told the French-speaking public radio station La 1ère on Saturday.The temporary solution is beneficial for both sides, a commission representative tells ScienceInsider. “We have an interest in having the best participants in the program, and Swiss participants are certainly world-class,” he says. But in the long run, the immigration issue remains a flash point: If it doesn’t ratify the Croatia protocol before 9 February 2017—3 years after the immigration referendum—Switzerland will lose its associated status again. If it does sign the protocol, however, it will regain its associated country status for the whole of Horizon 2020.The agreement will be signed formally in December, but will apply retroactively from today onward. According to an E.U. source, “all member states stand behind this deal, including Croatia.”last_img read more