Trudeau says G7 summit chance to show citizens they can have confidence

first_imgQUEBEC – The annual G7 meeting remains useful and important because it helps citizens around the world continue to have confidence in the future, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said Thursday.There is a lot of anxiety and concern about protectionism and “negative nationalism” around the world, Trudeau said, and the G7 meeting allows the leaders of the world’s seven most advanced economies to discuss these issues.“In order to counter the rise of protectionism and negative nationalism that we are seeing in certain parts of the world — with authoritarianism and the exclusion of others — we know we have to talk about it,” he said.“And we have to show that we are helping people have confidence in the future. (The G7 summit) is a chance for us to come together on the issue.”Trudeau was attending a preparatory meeting in Quebec City two months ahead of the June 8-9 G7 summit in Charlevoix, northeast of the provincial capital.The G7 consists of Canada, France, the United States, the United Kingdom, Germany, Japan and Italy, with the European Union being a non-enumerated member.A collective of “social groups” opposed to the vision and goals of the G7 was planning a protest Thursday afternoon in Quebec City.“This will be an occasion for social groups to publicly protest against this anti-democratic and neo-liberal meeting,” said a statement on the collective’s Facebook page.Past G7 get-togethers — as well as similar meetings of wealthy countries — have attracted throngs of protests, which sometimes turn violent.Trudeau suggested the federal government would pick up the tab for the costs of any damage associated with protests.“The discussions are ongoing on this issue,” he said.“We recognize that the G7 is a federal responsibility and the costs associated with the G7. We understand it’s a big responsibility for the federal government and we will continue to work with out partners like the city, like the province.”last_img read more

Pamela Anderson Donates To National Domestic Violence Hotline

first_imgActress, author and philanthropist Pamela Anderson announced today the donation of $30,000 to the National Domestic Violence Hotline (The Hotline) on behalf of the Pamela Anderson Foundation.This marks the fourth year of the Pamela Anderson Foundation’s generous support of The Hotline. Anderson, who now spends most of her time raising funds for non-profit organizations worldwide, visited The Hotline’s headquarters in 2015 to present a $60,000 donation and hear firsthand how advocates are making a difference in the lives of those affected by abuse.Anderson’s donation will support The Hotline’s work in educating and providing resources to family members affected by abusive relationships in the home, by providing emotional support, safety planning and local resources, such as legal advice and counseling.Advocates from The Hotline often hear from victims and survivors whose abusive partners exploit their children as a tactic for control in the relationship. They work with victims and survivors to assess tactics that are used when there are young people in the home and provide safety-planning tips. They also coach families on how to communicate when alcohol and drug abuse are factors.Every day, advocates at The Hotline receive nearly 1,300 calls, chats and texts from victims, survivors and their friends and family seeking information about domestic violence. With one in four women, one in seven men and one in three teens experiencing physical, emotional or verbal abuse by an intimate partner in their lifetime, the need to provide resources and support for victims is critical.“It’s a privilege to continue to support the important work of the National Domestic Violence Hotline, whose advocates I’ve had an opportunity to meet and hear from directly,” said Pamela Anderson, founder of the Pamela Anderson Foundation. “As a mother of two, I am particularly delighted to know that our donation will help ensure that families in need of both compassion and information will continue to find a 24/7, trusted resource in The Hotline.”“Our everyday work is made possible by supporters like Pamela Anderson, and we are tremendously grateful for her partnership and generous contributions over the past four years,” said Katie Ray-Jones, chief executive officer of The Hotline. “The Foundation’s support significantly and positively impacts our ability to offer services and provide resources for parents who are experiencing abuse, which is critical to our mission.”last_img read more

Here’s a quick glance at unemployment rates for January, by Canadian city

OTTAWA — The national unemployment rate was 5.8 per cent in January. Statistics Canada also released seasonally adjusted, three-month moving average unemployment rates for major cities. It cautions, however, that the figures may fluctuate widely because they are based on small statistical samples. Here are the jobless rates last month by city (numbers from the previous month in brackets):— St. John’s, N.L. 7.4 per cent (7.4)— Halifax 5.1 (5.6)— Moncton, N.B. 5.4 (5.2)— Saint John, N.B. 6.2 (6.3)— Saguenay, Que. 4.8 (5.1)— Quebec 3.8 (3.9)— Sherbrooke, Que. 5.2 (5.4)— Trois-Rivieres, Que. 5.2 (5.3)— Montreal 6.1 (6.0)— Gatineau, Que. 5.0 (4.8)— Ottawa 5.3 (5.0)— Kingston, Ont. 5.8 (6.0)— Peterborough, Ont. 5.9 (5.0)— Oshawa, Ont. 5.6 (5.7)— Toronto 6.1 (6.0)— Hamilton, Ont. 3.9 (4.3)— St. Catharines-Niagara, Ont. 6.8 (7.0)— Kitchener-Cambridge-Waterloo, Ont. 4.9 (5.1)— Brantford, Ont. 5.9 (6.3)— Guelph, Ont. 1.9 (2.3)— London, Ont. 5.2 (5.0)— Windsor, Ont. 5.2 (5.3)— Barrie, Ont. 5.1 (4.9)— Sudbury, Ont. 6.7 (6.3)— Thunder Bay, Ont. 5.5 (5.2)— Winnipeg 5.7 (5.8)— Regina 4.8 (5.7)— Saskatoon 5.8 (5.6)— Calgary 7.3 (7.5)— Edmonton 6.4 (6.3)— Kelowna, B.C. 3.1 (3.3)— Abbotsford-Mission, B.C. 4.8 (4.5)— Vancouver 4.8 (4.5)— Victoria 3.6 (3.6)The Canadian Press read more

Somali political bickering undermines peace process – UN envoy

“We had reached a stage where we thought we had provided a very good momentum through the Djibouti agreement two years ago… we had agreed in Djibouti that the transitional has to come to an end in August,” Augustine Mahiga, the Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Somalia, told the UN News Centre. “The problem is that neither Parliament nor the Government want change. And that is the crux of the paralysis,” said Mr. Mahiga. Somalia’s transitional parliament voted in February to extend its term for three years after the end of the transitional period, a move rejected by the Transitional Federal Government (TFG), which has instead proposed extending the interim period for one year, saying it wanted to try to enhance political stability and security. Earlier this week, the Security Council called upon Somali’s transitional federal institutions (TFIs) to “ensure cohesion and focus on the completion of the transitional tasks.” It regretted decisions by the TFIs to extend their mandates unilaterally and urged them to refrain from further unilateral action. “What we are trying to do in the Security Council and [other] stakeholders in the region, the African Union and IGAD [regional Intergovernmental Authority on Development] is to heal this paralysis and provide a fresh momentum to push the peace process forward by agreeing on the necessary benchmarks for the end of the transition,” said Mr. Mahiga. The benchmarks include political outreach to political factions and Somalia’s semi-autonomous regional administrations to foster dialogue and reconciliation, and the drafting of a new constitution for the Horn of Africa country, which has lacked a fully functioning national government and has been wracked by factional warfare since 1991. “The Government has not succeeded in undertaking any political reforms that would inject new momentum into the process,” said Mr. Mahiga. “At the moment the political will is lacking.” “What I need to do with the help of the Security Council, IGAD and the African Union is to try first of all to create congenial conditions for the two institutions… to see the extent to which we can develop consensus to hold the elections in August or to have them deferred,” he said. He said the Security Council is expected to meet Somalia’s leadership and representatives from the AU and IGAD in the Kenyan capital, Nairobi, during its forthcoming mission to Africa, in an effort to break the deadlock. Mr. Mahiga said that TFG forces and allied militia have, with the support of the troops of the AU mission in Somalia (AMISOM), made significant territorial gains against Al Shabaab insurgents in the capital, Mogadishu, as well as in the central, western and southern areas. “My worry is that this political bickering may adversely affect this very significant military gains on the ground,” he said. He also stressed that Somalia’s semi-autonomous regions could form the basis for a viable federal government. “This needs to be brought into the political dialogue for an agreed framework of federalism, devolution, decentralisation,” he said. “Both the Government and Parliament have not addressed this issue,” he said. Mr. Mahiga voiced great concern over the humanitarian situation in Somalia, saying it was “worse that it has ever been”, with more than 75 per cent of livestock having perished as a result of the prevailing severe drought, and people moving from one corner of the country to another and across the borders into neighbouring countries in search of food and water. “The international community has not given enough resources for food and other basics. This is our cry to the international community,” said Mr. Mahiga. An estimated 2.4 million people – or about a third of the country’s 7.2 million people – are in need of relief aid as a result of drought and two decades of conflict. 13 May 2011Political divisions between Somalia’s transitional Government and interim Parliament have undermined the momentum of the country’s peace process, a United Nations envoy said today, calling for a concerted regional and international effort to help break the stalemate. read more

US trade gap widens 133 per cent in July to 391 billion

by Martin Crutsinger, The Associated Press Posted Sep 4, 2013 8:58 am MDT US trade gap widens 13.3 per cent in July to $39.1 billion, fueled by record auto imports WASHINGTON – The U.S. trade deficit widened in July from a four-year low in June. American consumers bought more foreign cars and other imported goods, while U.S. companies exported fewer long-lasting manufactured goods.The rise in imports points to resilient consumer spending, which drives 70 per cent of economic activity.The Commerce Department said Wednesday that the trade gap rose 13 per cent to $39.1 billion. That’s up from June’s deficit of $34.5 billion, which was the smallest since late 2009.Imports increased 1.6 per cent to $228.6 billion, lifted by more shipments of oil, autos and consumer goods. Exports slipped 0.6 per cent to $189.4 billion. Companies shipped fewer capital goods, such as civilian aircraft and industrial engines.A wider trade gap can slow economic growth because it means that U.S. consumers and businesses are spending more on foreign goods than U.S. companies are earning from overseas sales.Still, the decline follows a steep drop in June. And economists noted that trade is running at roughly the same pace as the previous quarter. Many were also encouraged by the increase in imports of consumer products. That follows a weak government report last week on consumer spending in July.Paul Ashworth, chief U.S. economist at Capital Economics, said that he expected trade would be “broadly neutral” in terms of overall economic growth in the second half of this year, not subtracting from growth or adding to it.Gregory Daco, director of U.S. economics for IHS Global Insight, said the rise in imports reflects stronger consumer and business demand. Those could be encouraging signs for economic growth.Most economists expect the economy will grow at an annual rate between 2 per cent and 2.5 per cent in the second half of this year. Many say consumers will increase spending as the impact of higher taxes starts to fade.In July, the deficit with China jumped to an all-time high of $30.1 billion and is slightly ahead of last year’s record pace. That could increase pressure on the Obama administration to take a harder line on trade issues with China. American manufacturers contend China manipulates its currency and engages in other unfair practices to gain trade advantages over U.S. companies.Europe’s weak economy also is weighing on U.S. exports. The deficit with the 27-nation European Union jumped to a record $13.9 billion as imports from that region climbed 17.2 per cent to a record $35.1 billion while U.S. exports to the region fell 7.4 per cent to $21.1 billion.Other reports suggest exports could rebound in August.U.S. factories expanded in August at the fastest pace since June 2011, according to a closely watched survey released Tuesday from the Institute for Supply Management. The report said orders from overseas rose in August.And a private survey of purchasing managers in China found that manufacturing in that country expanded for the first time after shrinking for three months.The Federal Reserve is closely watching economic data to determine whether it should reduce its monthly bond purchases. Those purchases have been intended to keep long-term borrowing costs low.Chairman Ben Bernanke has said the Fed could slow its $85 billion a month in bond buying later this year if the economy keeps improving. Some analysts think the Fed will announce after its next policy meeting Sept. 17-18 that it’s scaling back the purchases. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email read more

Iraq and global community must protect internally displaced as crisis deepens –

In a press release from Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR), Chaloka Beyani, Special Rapporteur on the human rights of internally displaced persons, called on the international community not to turn its back on the situation in light of a significant shortfall in humanitarian funding. “Despite some positive steps by the Government, its approach to the displacement crisis has been largely ad hoc to-date,” Mr. Beyani said after his first official visit to Iraq from 9 to 15 May.“Disturbing ongoing developments, including the fall of Ramadi to ISIS [Islamic State of Iraq and Syria], and possible Government offensives to regain lost cities including Mosul, will certainly result in massive new displacement,” he added. “Despite the challenges in the short, medium and long-term, it is imperative that the international community recognizes its responsibilities and remains a consistent and reliable humanitarian partner,” the UN expert stressed. “Agencies are stretched thin and unable to address all urgent needs. They can only work with the resources that they have and those are grossly inadequate at the present time.” “IDPs from all ethnic and religious communities are surviving in precarious conditions, often under the threat of violence and further displacement and with inadequate shelter, healthcare, food and water,” he stated. “The situation of hundreds of thousands of IDPs living in areas controlled by ISIS [also known as ISIL or the Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant] is unclear and deeply worrying.”“Access to humanitarian assistance for many IDPs is poor and must improve. This means ensuring access to humanitarian actors,” Mr. Beyani said. “Many IDPs have also lost documents and face bureaucratic barriers to receiving assistance. One family told aid workers ‘we could not save our daughter, how could we save our documents?’”The expert visited IDPs living in cramped, substandard conditions in collective shelters and unfinished buildings. He noted that a one-off cash payment to families of $700 dollars is insufficient even to cover basic needs including shelter and food. On another note, at least 100 families had to return from Baghdad to Ramadi where their homes had been damaged when ISIS still controlled much of the city. Now that the city has reportedly fallen, the Government must allow the newly displaced from Ramadi to freely enter Baghdad. The Babylon Governorate has refused to admit displaced men between 15 and 50, causing family separation as only women and children are allowed entry.“While legitimate security concerns exist, including that ISIS may infiltrate IDP communities, the overwhelming majority of IDPs are innocent victims of the conflict and must be treated as such on protection and humanitarian grounds,” the Special Rapporteur concluded.Chaloka Beyani, professor of international law at the London School of Economics, was appointed Special Rapporteur on the human rights of internally displaced persons by the Human Rights Council in September 2010.Special Rapporteurs are part of what is known as the Special Procedures of the Human Rights Council, the largest body of independent experts in the UN human rights system. They work on a voluntary basis, are not UN staff and do not receive a salary for their work. read more

15 of the most terrifying rollercoasters on the planet

first_img A car plowed through the main hall of Trump Plaza in New Rochelle, New York WE DON’T HAVE too many of them in Ireland, but that doesn’t mean that we don’t appreciate a good dose of fear on a stomach-turning, death-defying rollercoaster.Part of the fun for thrill seekers is that each one is a little different. Will it have a steep drop? Could it hang you upside down? Or maybe it just causes your heart to race because it feels too rickety to handle that next loop?From the sharpest drops to the fastest rides, these coasters are an adrenaline junkie’s dream.The Wicked TwisterRiders face epic 450-degree spirals at more than 110 kph on this ride in Ohio in the US.(Image: Wikimedia Commons)The ColossosThis gigantic wooden coaster in Germany lives up to its name as the highest wooden rollercoaster in Europe at 60 metres high, and is said to be a “smooth as steel” ride.(Image: Heide Park)The Kingda KaThis rollercoaster in New Jersey’s Six Flags adventure park is the tallest in the world.(Video: sixflgs15/YouTube) The US is building a case against Iran in the attacks on Saudi Arabia, but Trump is in no rush to act 16-year-old Greta Thunberg met with Obama and chided senators, saying they’re not trying hard enough to fight climate change center_img Top Thrill DragsterThis ride, also in Ohio, goes from zero to 190 kph in just four seconds, and you’re shot 128 metres into the air. It’s all over in just 17 seconds, but it’s worth it. Probably.(AP Photo/Paul M Walsh)Tower of Terror IIBecause apparently one wasn’t enough – the second Tower of Terror in Queensland, Australia, shoots 115 metres into the air (backwards) at 160 kph before dropping you back down to earth.(Image: Dreamworld)El ToroTranslate as ‘The Bull,’ the wooden El Toro at Six Flags Great Adventure park in New Jersey has a 76 degree drop and nine separate weightless ‘airtime’ opportunities. Who said steel coasters were better?(Image: Six Flags)Volcano: The Blast CoasterThis winding coaster shoots riders out of a volcano at Kings Dominion in Virginia in the US, and has one of the world’s tallest inversions at almost 50 metres off the ground.(Image: Kings Dominion)Superman Krypton CoasterThe Superman ride at Six Flags Fiesta Texas in the US throws you for one of the biggest loops in the world – 360 degrees at 45 metres in the air.(Video: wwwCOASTERFORCEcom/YouTube)Formula RossaAbu Dhabi is home to the world’s fastest rollercoaster, topping out at 240 kph in under five seconds. Protective eyewear is required since passengers will experience what 4.8 Gs really feels like.(Image: Ferrari World)Coney Island CycloneEven Superstorm Sandy couldn’t destroy this New York City landmark and ancient hybrid coaster. The 1920s-era ride in Coney Island still whips riders into a frenzy – just don’t eat a hot dog before strapping in.(Pic: AP Photo/Seth Wenig/File)TakabishaThe Fuji-Q Highland park in Japan boasts the steepest drop in the world on its Takabisha coaster. It sends it riders tumbling at 121 degrees at 100kph.(Screengrab via YouTube)Texas GiantThe steepest Wooden coaster on the planet is this behemoth at Six Flags Over Texas in the US. It has a 79-degree drop, and shoots riders 14 stories into the air.(Image: Six Flags)Millennium ForceNamed the best steel coaster in the world three years ago, the Millennium Force at Cedar Point in Ohio (yes, again) ranks in the top ten for the tallest, fastest and steepest rides in the world.(Image: Cedar Point)OblivionThis steel roller coaster at Alton Towers was the first vertical drop rollercoaster in the world. It soars at 60 metres in the air with riders experiencing up to 4.5 Gs of force.(IMage: Rui Vieira/PA Archive)Full throttleOpening this summer at Six Flags Magic Mountain in California, Full Throttle is going to set the record as the world’s tallest loop-de-loop at 160 feet in the air. It will also catapult riders from zero to 112 kph in the air on two forward launches.(Source: Six Flags)Read: An Austrian man tip-toed along a line strung 185 metres off the ground yesterday > Read: 12 of the most shameless film product placements of all time > SpaceX is trying to buy a hamlet inside its Texas rocket-launch site because it ‘did not anticipate’ there’d be any ‘significant disruption’ to residents who live there last_img read more

Internet Explorer 10 to 90 installed compared

first_imgAt the beginning of this month we saw a fascinating video on the Windows operating system being upgraded from the initial 1.0 version right through to the current Windows 7. For the most part it worked without a problem, and Microsoft has to be commended for that.Now we have a follow-up video, but this time the focus is on installing Internet Explorer and seeing if all versions still manage to function. I’m sure you won’t be surprised to find that they don’t. At the same time you may also learn a few facts such as IE2 came out only a couple of months after IE1. Or the fact that CSS didn’t appear for a year after IE1, so that’s why a lot of sites today can’t render properly in it.One thing this video history did make clear is that Microsoft really didn’t care about standard that much as it dominated the markets during the early versions. Internet Explorer 6 is the often used example of a browser that is still in use today, but really needs to be upgraded due to the problems it causes.Anyone who has been browsing the web for the last two decades probably has fond and painful memories of using IE. I remember when it was the only real browser choice, but I also remember that first day I installed Firefox and never looked back.Recently IE has faced a pretty speedy downturn in market share due in most part to other browsers getting better. With IE9 now available has Microsoft turned a corner and got itself back in the game? The Acid 3 test suggests it may have, but then Firefox 4 and the next iteration of Google Chrome are only just around the corner.via YouTubelast_img read more

Canicule prévention et mobilisation des commerçants parisiens

first_imgCanicule : prévention et mobilisation des commerçants parisiens France – A Paris, devant un risque grandissant de canicule, les commerçants seront cet été des “vigies sociales”.Le maire de Paris Bertrand Delanoë a lancé l’opération “commerçants solidaires” dans sa ville. En cas de canicule, 300 à 400 commerçants et artisans devront faire preuve de vigilance envers les personnes âgées de leur quartier. Information et prévention : tous devront se mobiliser pour éviter que se renouvelle la catastrophe de l’été 2003. Pour les aider dans cette tâche, des volontaires leur ont distribué des kits.Cette campagne a démarré hier, mardi 29 juin. Elle a été initiée conjointement par la mairie de Paris, la Chambre de commerce et d’industrie délégation Paris et enfin, la Chambre des métiers et de l’artisanat de Paris. Afin de souligner cette action et d’affirmer son cadre formel, une charte a été signée par ces trois institutions. Le 30 juin 2010 à 13:24 • Emmanuel Perrinlast_img read more

Guardiola is one of the best coaches in the world if

first_imgThe Austrian defender David Alaba has showered his former manager Pep Guardiola with praises, for introducing a new way of playing to the world.Bayern Munich left-back David Alaba affirms that Guardiola has brought to bare a new style of football at Bayern.“He meant a lot to me, I learned a lot from working with him. I knew that I could make a lot of decisions [on the pitch] and I guess he’s one of the best coaches in the world, if not the best.” Alaba said via Goal“He brought a new style of football – not only to our team but to the world. We improved. We learned a lot about football and the way we played.“When we won the championship … the style of football that we played was great.”jose mourinhoMourinho knows why City and Liverpool are so far ahead George Patchias – September 13, 2019 Jose Mourinho knows why Manchester City and Liverpool are so far ahead of everyone else in the Premier League.In an interview with the Telegraph,…Guardiola left for Manchester City in July 2016, where he led the team to the Premier League title last season.Alaba, though, believes that City could have got more out of a surprising Champions League quarter-final exit to Liverpool last season.“They won the championship in England in a really good way,” the 26-year-old said.“He’s doing a great job. He was unlucky in that Champions League [quarter]-final against Liverpool.”Guardiola managed Alaba at Bayern between 2013 and 2016, winning the Bundesliga title in all three campaigns he was in charge. Prior to his time as Bayern’s coach, Guardiola as Barcelona team manager, led the team through a perpetual victory parade, winning more than a dozen trophies in four years.last_img read more

Man accused of stealing guns from car in Brickell denied bond

first_imgMIAMI (WSVN) – A South Florida man accused of stealing three firearms from the trunk of a parked car in Brickell will remain behind bars.Robert Patterson appeared in court on Wednesday and was denied bond. He is being charged with burglary and grand theft.Read More: Homeless man accused of stealing assault rifles from car in BrickellSurveillance cameras rolled as, police said, Patterson entered a condominium parking garage off Brickell Avenue and Northeast 11th Street, June 12.The footage shows him breaking into a 2016 black Mercedes Benz E-400, opening the trunk and stealing two assault rifles and a handgun.Related Content: 2 assault rifles stolen from car in BrickellCopyright 2019 Sunbeam Television Corp. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.last_img read more

BJP leader takes up membership drive

first_imgKukatpally: Former councillor and BJP leader Pannala Harish Chandra Reddy went round houses in KPHB VII phase on Sunday as part of the party membership campaign. During the drive, one Allam Srinivas Yadav joined the party.Among those who took part in the membership drive were BJYM official representative Preetam Reddy, division president Hari Babu, activists/leaders Enugu Venkateshwar Reddy, Kumar, Varalakshmi, Dasari Ramesh, Ravi, Pavan, Thota Ramesh, Vasudeva Reddy, Kiran Reddy, Shankar and Narsimhulu.last_img read more

BlackBerry to Bring Popular BBM App to Android and iOS Devices

first_imgMay 14, 2013 If you’re one of the many smartphone users who made the jump from a BlackBerry to an iPhone or Android device, one feature you might be missing most is BlackBerry Messenger (BBM), which allows you to instant message with other BlackBerry users. Or, perhaps, it’s the one reason you’ve decided to stay with BlackBerry since other operating systems don’t offer it.Either way, that’s about to change. BlackBerry announced today that it is bringing BBM to Android and iOS devices. BlackBerry said the app will support iOS6 and Android 4.0 (Ice Cream Sandwich) or higher. It should be available sometime this summer, pending approval from the Apple App Store and Google Play.Related: BlackBerry’s New OS, Smartphones: What’s in it for Business Users?With the BBM app, Android and iPhone users will be able to send and receive multi-person chats and share photos and voice notes. Another feature, called BBM Groups, allows users to organize their contacts into specific groups of up to 30 people.It’s a big move for business users who prefer the immediacy of messaging over the internet — as BBM does — compared to texting, which can be slower and eats up data on your mobile plan. It will also allow individuals to expand their pool of family, friends and colleagues with whom they will be able to send instant messages over their smartphones.BlackBerry also announced BBM Channels. Like LinkedIn’s new Channels feature, it allows BlackBerry users to follow the businesses, brands, celebrities and groups they are most interested in.Related: Beyond Smartphones: Mobile Innovation That Could Change the Way You Do Business  Enroll Now for Free Free Workshop | August 28: Get Better Engagement and Build Trust With Customers Nowcenter_img 2 min read This hands-on workshop will give you the tools to authentically connect with an increasingly skeptical online audience.last_img read more

Need urgent help on a national route Check the marker boards

first_imgAlso read: MEC Kaunda and mayor of Umvoti/Greytown visit Msinga after horror crashIn an emergency or if you have broken down, you can use these route marker boards to identify your location and you will get help faster.Remember that the national number to call for assistance is 10177 or 112.So, stay safe and enjoy the journey!Click to receive news links via WhatsApp. Or  for the latest news, visit our webpage or follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Join us there! WebsiteWebsiteWebsite WebsiteWebsiteWebsite WebsiteWebsiteWebsite Anything can happen while you are travelling on the roads and you may need urgent help.So paying attention to the marker boards along the route you are on and taking cognizance of the information they provide is definitely the clever thing to do.Marker boards are small blue boards on all national routes and are placed on each side of the road every 200m.Read also: 5 tips to make long drives more bearable, and stay alivelast_img read more

Razer Phone 2 and FirstGeneration Razer Phone Have Been Discounted but Only

first_img Share Tweet Submit If you have been looking for a decent deal on a gaming smartphone, Razer has an offer for you. Both the Razer Phone and Razer Phone 2 have been discounted, but the color options are limited. Paint-job aside, this one-day offer is too good to be missed if you want a gaming device.At $799.99, the Razer Phone 2 was an expensive device, but given its impressive hardware specifications it was competing with the best Android flagships money could buy. The phone is fueled by the Snapdragon 845 chipset and is accompanied by a whopping 8GB of RAM and 64GB of internal memory.The phone also features a vapor chamber cooling system, which will prevent your phone from heating up during prolonged gaming sessions. It packs in a huge 4,000mAh battery, supports wireless charging, and IP67 certified against water and dust. On the back, there is a dual 12MP camera system.The phone known for its 120Hz refresh rate is being offered for $699.99 on the official U.S. website of the company. This means that you will save a $100 on the feature-packed phone. The deal started at midnight on December 6, and since its validity is 24 hours, you will have to hurry up if you want to buy it. Unfortunately, the Satin Black version is not available at this price, and your only option is the Mirror Black model.That is not to say that the Mirror Black is an eyesore. It features dual front-firing stereo speakers, a luminous glass back, and the famed customizable Chroma RGB lighting as well. The phone does have chunky bezels, but since this is a gaming device, this design works for the Razer Phone 2. If your budget is tight, you can also get the original Razer Phone for $399.99, which is a significant reduction from the original $699.99 price.Buy the Razer Phone 2 for $699.99Buy the Razer Phone for $399.99last_img read more

read more

first_img Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: MRI Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Recent Videos View all 606 items Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophy Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. Find more SCCT news and videos Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. Find more SCCT news and videos Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Conference Coverage View all 396 items Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting. Find more SCCT news and videos Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Here Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients First CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.” Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Molecular Imaging View all 22 items Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  Women’s Health View all 62 items Find more SCCT news and videos Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Videos | March 22, 2011 Vitrea Enterprise Suite 1.3 Features New Cardiac Applications Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Vital Images’ Vitrea Enterprise Suite 1.3 advanced visualization software offers new cardiac analysis applications and workflow features. Analysis tools include pediatric multi-chamber cardiac analysis, an edge-detecting contour editing tool and a vessel wall feature for efficient vessel navigation in any CT angiography scan. Workflow features include ubiquitous report editing, DICOM print capability from any thin client server and a “save as” feature that allows images to be saved and exported to any computer on the network. AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting.center_img Find more news and videos from AAPM. Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  Find more news and videos from AAPM. Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Radiation Oncology View all 91 items Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Sponsored Videos View all 142 items Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicine CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM. Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio TrackFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” Technology Reports View all 9 items Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.  Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” Find more SCCT news and videos Radiology Imaging View all 288 items Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. Find more SCCT news and videos Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Information Technology View all 220 items Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaginglast_img read more

The Transition to 3D Breast Imaging

first_imgFeature | Women’s Health | March 06, 2018 | By Katherine Hall, M.D. The Transition to 3-D Breast Imaging Improving mammography reading efficiency and patient outcomes News | Mammography Reporting Software | July 26, 2019 Ikonopedia Releases Automated Combined Reporting Package at AHRA Ikonopedia showcased its recently released Automated Combined Reporting package and its entire suite of structured… read more Another benefit of tomosynthesis is reducing patients’ radiation exposure, which is especially important if they need additional testing.Technological advances — particularly the adoption of 3-D digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) — are making it possible for earlier, and more accurate, detection of breast cancer. However, the transition to 3-D mammography is resulting in numerous challenges and concerns. DBT produces hundreds of images, compared to just four images typically associated with conventional 2-D digital mammography. As a result, radiologists find they require significantly more time to review and interpret each exam, reducing the number of patients they can see each day and increasing fatigue, which could potentially lead to missed diagnoses.At the Southwest Diagnostic Imaging Center in Dallas, Texas, 80,000 mammograms are conducted each year. To maintain a competitive advantage and provide optimal patient care, the center began planning a move to 3-D mammography. But in the process, it was clear the imaging center needed a way to ensure it could continue to serve as many patients annually, without overwhelming theradiologists, who would have to review exponentially more images with the new technology. News | PACS | August 09, 2019 Lake Medical Imaging Selects Infinitt for Multi-site RIS/PACS Infinitt North America will be implementing Infinitt RIS (radiology information system)/PACS (picture archiving and… read more Find more articles and videos on breast imaging News | Mammography | August 14, 2019 Imago Systems Announces Collaboration With Mayo Clinic for Breast Imaging Image visualization company Imago Systems announced it has signed a know-how license with Mayo Clinic. The multi-year… read more Feature | Artificial Intelligence | July 19, 2019 | Michal Chorev AI Models Predict Breast Cancer With Radiologist-level Accuracy Breast cancer is the global leading cause of cancer-related deaths in women, and the most commonly diagnosed cancer… read more Technology | Breast Biopsy Systems | July 24, 2019 Fujifilm Releases Tomosynthesis Biopsy Option for Aspire Cristalle Mammography System Fujifilm Medical Systems U.S.A. Inc. recently expanded its breast imaging solutions with the launch of its… read more News | Artificial Intelligence | August 13, 2019 Artificial Intelligence Could Yield More Accurate Breast Cancer Diagnoses University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) researchers have developed an artificial intelligence (AI) system that… read more Related Content Katherine Hall, M.D., co-director of mammography, east division of Radiology Associates of North Texas, is a radiologist at Southwest Diagnostic Imaging Center which is located on the campus of Presbyterian Hospital of Dallas. FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Image courtesy of Imago Systems AI Aids in Accelerated DetectionAfter an extensive review of various tomosynthesis technologies, GE Healthcare’s Senographe Pristina 3-D Mammography solution was implemented. This enabled the imaging center to also take advantage of Enhanced V-Preview, an innovative concurrent-read, cancer detection solution powered by iCAD’s PowerLook Tomo Detection on the GE platform. The solution leverages artificial intelligence (AI) and deep learning tools to reduce DBT interpretation time and improve reading workflow.The technology quickly and precisely detects regions of interest on the tomosynthesis dataset and naturally blends those regions onto a synthetic 2-D image. This process results in a single enhanced image that draws attention to potentially cancerous lesions, enabling radiologists to more efficiently and effectively review large sets of tomosynthesis images. Because it improves how quickly hundreds of images per patient can be reviewed, this concurrent-read technology supports us as radiologists with dynamic tools that allow for providing results to patients faster without compromising reading performance or increasing recalls.Some radiologists may be skeptical about AI in medical diagnoses. They express concern that AI would replace their trained eye and expertise. However, the technology is designed to quickly identify and lead professionals to the most concerning areas that warrant further investigation. With greater use of 3-D technology, more detailed information about patients’ breasts is available and can help identify even the smallest changes year-over-year that could be a sign of a developing cancer.Another benefit is reducing patients’ radiation exposure, which is especially important if they need to go on for additional testing. New protocols were adopted with this system and by doing so, the number of images needed is minimized, thus limiting additional radiation to patients. Additionally, by reducing false positives, it is possible to eliminate the need for patients to return for additional mammograms to rule out problems. Qlarity Imaging’s software is used to assist radiologists in the assessment and characterization of breast lesions. Imaging features are synthesized by an artificial intelligence algorithm into a single value, the QI score, which is analyzed relative to a database of reference abnormalities with known ground truth. Image courtesy of Business Wire. IBM collected a dataset of 52,936 images from 13,234 women who underwent at least one mammogram between 2013 and 2017, and who had health records for at least one year prior to the mammogram. The algorithm was trained on 9,611 mammograms. Image courtesy of Radiology. Technology | Mammography Reporting Software | July 25, 2019 Hologic Partners With MagView to Develop Unifi EQUIP Solution Hologic announced a partnership with mammography information solutions provider MagView to develop Unifi EQUIP, an… read more A New Approach Yields ResultsMoving to DBT required radiologists to shift their mindset and modify their approach to reading mammography images. A redesigned reading protocol, moving from comparing current and prior 2-D images, made it easier to focus more on the comparison of tomosynthesis to 3-D for easier identification of potential concerns.Even though the 3-D technology is providing massive amounts of information, which could easily throw anyone into image overload, the software helps hone in on the areas that really need to be evaluated with ease, by presenting the data in the forefront of the dataset. Since implementing the system, the imaging center’s radiologists have cut down their reading time by 25 to 50 percent, depending on the size of the breast.  Image by rawpixel from Pixabay  Technology | Artificial Intelligence | July 18, 2019 Paragon Biosciences Launches Qlarity Imaging to Advance FDA-cleared AI Breast Cancer Diagnosis System Paragon Biosciences LLC announced the launch of its seventh portfolio company, Qlarity Imaging LLC, which was founded… read more News | Breast Imaging | August 02, 2019 Volpara to Distribute Screenpoint Medical’s Transpara AI Solution Volpara Solutions and ScreenPoint Medical BV signed an agreement under which Volpara will sell ScreenPoint’s Transpara… read more Feature | Radiology Business | July 18, 2019 | By Stefanie Manack and Judy Zakutny Finding A Common Data Language for Radiology Approximately 30 percent of a hospital or health system’s profit comes from imaging according, to… read morelast_img read more

Train station near Disneyland Paris evacuated last night

first_img Friday, August 19, 2016 << Previous PostNext Post >> The Canadian Press Posted by Share PARIS – A train station close to Disneyland Paris was evacuated for two hours Thursday evening as bomb disposal teams were called in to examine a suspicious package.An Associated Press reporter witnessed how police and security staff of the SNCF, France’s national rail operator, sealed off Marne-la-Vallee train station, 25 kilometre (15 miles) east of the French capital.Thousands of travellers were later allowed to get back to the train station, yet the train traffic remained partially disrupted.Paris’ police confirmed there had been an intervention due to a “suspicious package” in the train station, but didn’t immediately provide any more details.Disneyland Paris said the park remained open to the public.Stations close to the site have been evacuated several times in recent weeks in what turned out to be false alarms amid a summer of tensions after a string of deadly extremist attacks.The park hosts about 15 million visitors a year, more than any attraction in Europe.More news:  Venice to ban cruise ships from city centre starting next monthThe French government held a special meeting Wednesday to discuss security measures, including a decision to increase the number of troops patrolling in sensitive sites of the Paris region as the new school year is about to start. Train station near Disneyland Paris evacuated last nightlast_img read more

Storm wipes out Florida sand dunes crucial for tourism

first_img JACKSONVILLE BEACH – When Christa Savva returned to the Sandy Shoes Beach Resort a day after Hurricane Matthew brushed by Melbourne Beach, Florida, she looked at the beach in front of the pink-flamingo-colored hotel and noticed that half the sand dunes had disappeared.Savva guesses three-quarters of the missing dunes washed into the ocean, and the remaining quarter scattered onto the resort’s beachfront property, which was undamaged by the hurricane.“I was like, ‘Oh, my goodness!’” Savva, a property manager for the Space-Age-era hotel, said Sunday. “It’s crazy to have the dunes gone and all you see is empty space.”The sand on Florida’s beaches is the equivalent of tourism gold, and its disappearance over time threatens the state’s No. 1 industry. While Hurricane Matthew didn’t ravage Florida’s coast as a series of storms did a dozen years ago, it collapsed dunes, washing away sand that protected buildings and roads during storms, and will likely require the spending of millions of dollars on beach restoration projects.In Jacksonville Beach, the top of the dunes collapsed onto the lower part of the dunes, creating 10-foot high cliffs of sand, rather than the usual gentle slopes of the dunes.Federal, state and local officials respond to beach erosion by depositing new sand in areas where it has disappeared, and the sand dunes act as barriers to infrastructure. Before these projects took off three decades ago, sea walls were often the only thing that stood between water, winds and buildings during storms.“The good news is a lot of people don’t realize our beaches are engineered. It looks natural, but we construct the sand so it’s sacrificed during hurricanes and protects roads and structures and potentially human lives,” said Jackie Keiser, a Jacksonville-area official with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.More news:  Rome enforces ban on sitting on Spanish StepsWhile a statewide evaluation of beach erosion has yet to be completed, individual Atlantic-coast counties from south of the Space Coast up to the Georgia border were assessing the lost sand.A $13.5 million project to replenish Jacksonville-area beaches with 650,000 thousand cubic yards of sand over seven miles was underway before Hurricane Matthew. Keiser said she is certain that same amount of sand was lost from the hurricane and the amount of sand needed for the project will likely double.Virginia Barker, the natural resources director for Brevard County, the area of Florida often referred to as the Space Coast, said the erosion from Hurricane Matthew appears to be more in the category of Hurricane Sandy in 2012 than a devastating series of hurricanes of 2004 and 2005. After Sandy, 2.4 million cubic yards of sand were needed to replenish 14 miles of Brevard County’s shoreline. The replenishment was far smaller than what was required after Hurricane Frances and Hurricane Jeanne made landfall just south of the Space Coast a dozen years ago.“This is world-famous Cocoa Beach. People come here for the sandy experience,” Barker said. “It’s tremendously important to our economy. The alternative is to allow erosion and let the sea go up and there will be no sandy beach.”In Georgia, it’s too early to tell the extent of beach erosion, but water did get past huge boulders placed along the shore to buffer properties and stop erosion, said Megan Desrosiers, CEO of One Hundred Miles, a Georgia coastal advocacy group.More news:  Can you guess the one and only hotel company to rank on Indeed’s Top Workplaces in Canada list?“The thing about Georgia is, we haven’t had a storm like this since the 1880s so it’s hard to know how to prepare when no one remembers the last time there was a storm like this,” Desrosiers said. “We don’t have experience with this type of storm on the Georgia coast, but Matthew was a perfect example of what we will see more of in the future.”Before Hurricane Matthew, more than half of Florida’s 663 miles of beaches were considered critically eroded by the state Department of Environmental Protection. The agency defines “critical erosion” as the disappearance of beach or dune to a degree that it affects the environment, development or recreational activities. About half of Florida’s 411 miles of beaches deemed to have “critical erosion” are part of a beach replenishment program.Before the storm, Brevard County had 41 miles of critical erosion, the area around Daytona Beach had almost 20 miles of beach erosion, the area around St. Augustine had almost 14 miles of critical erosion and the area around Jacksonville had more than 10 miles.In Melbourne Beach, now that half of the dunes are gone in front of the Sandy Shoes, the high tide can lap up to the steps that lead to the hotel’s wooden deck overlooking the beach.“There’s still a beach, and everything … but it’s just a lot flatter,” Savva said. “High tide is something you’re going to have to watch out for now.” Storm wipes out Florida sand dunes crucial for tourism Tags: Florida, Hurricane Matthew Posted by Travelweek Group center_img Share << Previous PostNext Post >> Tuesday, October 11, 2016 last_img read more

Diamond Award for Hotel Izulu

first_imgAt the 2013 Diner’s Club Winelist Awards, the 5-star Hotel Izulu, Ballito, has been awarded the impressive Diamond status, gaining a score of over 90%, for its new and extensive wine list. This is the third year that the Hotel has won an award and the first year it has gained the prestigious Diamond status. The judging panel consisted of Peter Goffe-Wood, JP Rossouw, Nikki Dumas, Benny Masekwameng, Dave Hughes, Fiona McDonald and Christine Rudman.States Managing Director, Grant Pringle: “We’re incredibly proud of our team for achieving this incredible award. Since the appointment of our new Executive Chef, Tyrone Sumner, we have completely redesigned our culinary and beverage experiences, with organic highlights in Gigi’s Brasserie, the private Chef’s Table, the romantic Wine Cellar and all our banqueting menus in the Imbizo Hall.”Look out for Hotel Izulu’s monthly Wine Markets in conjunction with leading and award-winning South African Wine Estates.Source = Hotel Izululast_img read more