Publishers Ad Agencies Talk Magazines 30

first_imgGiven the tough economic climate, John Griffin, National Geographic group president and Magazine Publishers of America chairman, said publishers must position their magazines to grab post-recession advertising. “Those are unallocated dollars,” Griffin said. “When that money comes back, I want it to come to us rather than someone else.”The challenges, Griffin acknowledged, are to meet the demand for faster audience metrics while appeasing advertisers who are used to the speed of the Internet, overnight television ratings and the other media willing to bend and contort to integrate marketing messages into their product offerings. “Advertisers want to borrow—or steal—the credibility and authority we have with our readers,” Griffin said. “And we want to give it to them” without threatening the credibility and authority, he said. “[At National Geographic] we’re always asking ‘How far can we go with this?’ It’s a contestant internal struggle.”“It’s the single biggest point of contention within our company,” said Deidre Depke, Newsweek.com’s assistant managing editor. (Depke recently took a buyout from Newsweek and is leaving the company, one of many longtime editorial staffers to do so.) “The only editorial asset our magazine has is its content—for us to abandon that, and let advertisers do what they want with it, would be a big mistake.”‘Handcuffs’ But Steve Sturm, group VP of strategic research and planning at Toyota Motor North America, said magazines need to realize that their readers don’t care as much about editorial ethics and the concept of a church-state line as publishers—if at all. “[The line] has been self-governed and self-policed—you’ve put the handcuffs on yourselves,” Sturm said. “The federal government, the state government, they haven’t told you to do it. You put up all these roadblocks” that other media don’t have. And a younger generation of potential readers, he said, “don’t play by the same rules you play by.”Another challenge young readers present, Griffin said, is a substantial pressure on newsstand price. “Younger consumers expect content to be free; we have to deal with that.”“It’s critical we get their attention,” Griffin continued. “They’re not going to the newsstand.”But Griffin said that improving the speed of audience metrics—as evidenced by the MPA’s recently-announced initiative to do so—is the top priority in 2008. We need to figure out a way to give [marketers] metrics at the speed they are demanding,” Griffin said, before clarifying. “Well, maybe not that speed, but faster than we are now.” NEW YORK—With dwindling newsstand and advertising revenue, slashed marketing budgets, skyrocketing postal and production costs—and, oh yeah, that recession thing—consumer magazine publishers need be innovative, perhaps more than ever before, to survive.And they’re probably going to have to blow up the church-state boundary between advertising and editorial, too.Those were the bullet points that dominated a lively discussion among some 700 advertising and publishing executives at the 12th annual New York Magazine Day Wednesday.last_img read more

A HuaweiGoogle smart speaker was reportedly being developed before the US ban

first_img Post a comment In addition to adding Huawei to the entity list, Trump at the same time signed an executive order essentially banning the company in light of national security concerns that Huawei had close ties with the Chinese government. Huawei has repeatedly denied that charge. Following the blacklisting, Google locked Huawei out of its Android updates, though the Commerce Department granted it a three-month general license in late May to update existing devices. Likely as a result, Huawei at the end of May moved to trademark the name of its own operating system, “Hongmeng,” in Peru. Huawei and Google declined to comment.First published at 2:14 p.m. PT on July 29. Updated at 2:53 p.m. PT: Huawei declined to comment; July 30 at 1:26 p.m. PT: Google declined to comment Huawei ban: Full timeline on how and why its phones are under fire Huawei secretly helped build North Korea’s wireless network, leaked documents suggest Huawei 5G ban could spread further How 5G got tied up in a trade war between Trump and China Tags The Huawei ban 0 1:23 Huawei’s P30 looks like fantastic forbidden fruit Smart Home Mobile Smart Speakers & Displays 18 Photos Share your voice Huawei was reportedly working on a smart speaker with Google. Angela Lang/CNET Huawei and Google were co-developing a smart speaker before the Chinese tech giant was blacklisted and banned in the US, according to a new report. Work on the smart home product was halted in May, The Information said Monday, citing several sources. Huawei was blacklisted in May when it was added to the United States’ “entity list,” But US companies will be able to sell equipment to Huawei, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross confirmed earlier this month, if they get licenses when there’s no threat to national security. Last week, US President Donald Trump reportedly agreed to award licensing deals between American companies and Chinese tech giant Huawei in a “timely” way. The Huawei smart speaker would have been powered by Google Assistant and been unveiled in September and sold in the US, The Information said.  “We worked on this project with Google for a year and made a lot of progress. Then everything suddenly stopped,” a Huawei employee reportedly said.  Google Huawei Now playing: Watch this: Huawei’s homegrown OS faces a steep uphill climblast_img read more

Sri Lanka imposes state of emergency over attacks

first_imgSecurity personnel stand guard outside St. Anthony`s Shrine in Colombo on 23 April two days after the church was hit in a series of bomb blasts targeting churches and luxury hotels in Sri Lanka. Photo: AFPSri Lanka on Tuesday imposed a state of emergency hours after the government blamed a local Islamist group for a series of suicide bomb blasts that killed at least 290 people, including dozens of foreigners.Twenty-four people have been arrested over the coordinated Easter Sunday assault on multiple churches and hotels in the capital Colombo and beyond, authorities said.The carnage — which also left some 500 people injured — was the worst atrocity since the South Asian country’s civil war ended a decade ago.The attacks were also the worst ever against Sri Lanka’s small Christian minority, who make up just seven percent of the country’s population of 21 million.Investigators are now hunting for clues on whether the National Thowheeth Jama’ath (NTJ) group received “international support”, said cabinet minister and government spokesman Rajitha Senaratne.The spokesman added that it was not possible for such “a small organisation” to carry out such well coordinated suicide strikes.The state of emergency, which gave police and the military special powers to counter militant strikes, came into force at midnight (1830 GMT Monday). Suspects can be detained without a court order.The country was already observing a second straight night-time curfew since the attacks.Officials are also investigating why more precautions were not taken after an April 11 warning from Sri Lanka’s police that a “foreign intelligence agency” had reported the NTJ planned suicide attacks on churches.Senaratne said that warning was not passed on to Prime Minister Ranil Wickremesinghe or other top ministers.”Intelligence sections have reported that there are international terror groups which are behind local terrorists,” President Maithripala Sirisena’s office said in a statement.Sirisena was due to meet with foreign diplomats on Tuesday “to seek international assistance to combat terrorism”, his office said.- Toll mounts, tensions high -Tensions remained high, with a bomb detonating as police prepared to defuse it near one of the targeted churches. Although there was a powerful blast, no injuries were reported.Police also found 87 bomb detonators at a Colombo bus station.The toll rose dramatically Monday to at least 290 dead.A police source told AFP that at least 37 foreigners were killed, while the tourism minister put that figure at 39 and the foreign ministry said there were 31 foreigners among the fatalities.That number was likely to shift again, as the United States reported at least four Americans killed — including a young student — and the Netherlands raised their toll to three.A Danish billionaire lost three of his children in the attacks, a spokesman for his company said.The death toll also included eight Britons, eight Indians and nationals from Turkey, Australia, France, Japan and Portugal, according to Sri Lankan officials and foreign governments.Several of those killed were dual nationals.The suicide bombers hit three Colombo luxury hotels popular with foreign tourists — the Cinnamon Grand, the Shangri-La and the Kingsbury — and three churches: two in the Colombo region and one in the eastern city of Batticaloa.Two additional blasts were triggered as security forces carried out raids searching for suspects.Interpol said it was deploying investigators and specialists to Sri Lanka, and the US State Department warned of possible further attacks in a travel advisory.”This is America’s fight, too,” US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo told reporters in Washington.- Memories of civil war -Ethnic and religious violence has plagued Sri Lanka for decades, with a 37-year conflict with Tamil rebels followed by an upswing in recent years in clashes between the Buddhist majority and Muslims.A memorial service and funeral were to be held Tuesday at St Sebastian’s church in Negombo, north of Colombo, where more than 100 people were killed Sunday.Among the dead were friends of 16-year-old Primasha Fernando, who was at her home nearby when the suicide bomber struck.”When I got to the church, there were people crying and screaming,” she told AFP.”I saw bodies everywhere,” she added in tears. “I saw parents carrying their dead babies.”At a government morgue in Colombo, relatives endured the gruesome task of identifying their loved ones.Janaka Shaktivel, 28, father of an 18-month-old son, sat in shock outside the building waiting for the body of his wife to be handed over.He said he escaped the blast at St Anthony’s Shrine in Colombo because the baby had started crying and he had to go outside.”I recognised her body from the wedding ring that she always wore,” he said. “I have no words to explain my feelings.”Two leading Muslim groups issued statements condemning the attacks, with the All Ceylon Jamiyaathuul Ulama, a council of Muslim theologians, urging the “maximum punishment for everyone involved in these dastardly acts.”The attacks drew global condemnation, including from US President Donald Trump and the pope.last_img

No bar to gazette publication on 9th wage board for journos

first_imgSupreme Court. File PhotoThe Supreme Court on Tuesday stayed for eight weeks a High Court order on the ninth wage board for journalists, clearing the way for publication of gazette notification to this end.A four-member bench of the Appellate Division, led by Chief Justice Mohammad Syed Mahmud Hossain, passed the order after hearing a government petition.It also asked the state to file a regular leave-to-appeal by this time.On 14 August the Chamber Judge fixed 19 August for hearing an appeal by the state seeking a stay on the High Court order to main the status quo on publication of the gazette notification on the ninth wage board.After the hearing on Monday, the Appellate Division set Tuesday for passing an order in this regard.Attorney general Mahbubey Alam represented the government while advocate AF Hasan Arif stood for Newspaper Owners’ Association of Bangladesh (NOAB).The HC bench of justice Obaidul Hassan and justice Mohammad Ali on 6 August issued the status quo after hearing a petition filed on 5 August.Last month, road transport and bridges minister Obaidul Quader said a gazette would be published soon after the Cabinet approves recommendations for implementing the 9th wage board.last_img read more