Bruce Arians chats with offensive coordinator Haro

first_imgBruce Arians chats with offensive coordinator Harold Goodwin on practice Tuesday, Aug. 9, 2016. (Adam Green/Arizona Sports) “Look forward to taking the pads off today. Had a great practice yesterday; bounced back extremely well. Take the pads off today, work on the Raiders for the young guys—they’ll get most of the work today so that they can put on the best performance they can in their first big evaluation.”Will you be calling plays in the preseason?“No, Harold (Goodwin) will have it all; the game plan the whole way. I’ll do game three.”So if you’re not calling plays what will you be doing on the sidelines?“Deciding if we got for it on fourth or go for two. Tough job. Somebody got to do it.”Does that free you up to chew more people out?“Yeah, they wish I was more involved in that part of it … especially the referees.”Do you see David Johnson still being involved in special teams?“Yeah, probably. A bunch of our starters are involved in special teams.”With Jake Coker, can you fix his mechanics?“You can quicken feet. It’s hard to change deliveries but you can tweak things and he’s gotten better of getting the ball out of his hand faster, and when he does get it out fast he’s pretty accurate.”Do you see this as Matt Barkley’s first real shot to show you what he’s got? Top Stories Have you noticed things getting chippy as camp grows longer“No, we don’t have any pushing and shoving. They’re just tired of listening to each other. Two days ago they weren’t going hard enough to get chippy. Yesterday was a lot better.”The training camp schedule is going to change some here in the next week. Are you looking to see how the team responds?“It’s great for us because the way our schedule goes during the season, you get into a routine and you fall into a routine. Once you start changing routines, I think that’s very good for a football team to see how they handle change of routine. Usually, if you play every Sunday at 1 o’clock, you ain’t very good. If you’re playing Thursday night, Sunday night, Monday night, change of schedules, you’re a pretty good football team. You have to learn to adapt, getting flexed, all those things that happen in the end of the season and we’ll go through some of that next week. I would’ve liked to have scheduled another team this week to work against, something we’ll look into in the future. Anxious to see how the two practices (Sunday and Monday) go outside next week to see if that’s a possibility to bring another team here and practice early in the morning.” Derrick Hall satisfied with D-backs’ buying and selling “Well, no, every practice is a chance to show me what you got. This is the first test to show everybody else what he’s got. Every practice you’re being evaluated in preparation, everything.”Has either one of those two quarterbacks stepped up to be the No. 3 guy?“Not yet. They both have potential to.”Is there a chance you would only keep two quarterbacks on the 53-man roster?“We have in the past plenty of times. It’s going to come down to who’s the best player, not the position. It’s just who’s the best player.”Have you seen enough consistency in your second- and third-team offensive linemen?“Not really. Antoine (McClain) has flashed a number of days and as he gets tired his technique goes down a little bit. John (Wetzel) is the same way. They’re both extremely heavy sweaters. They’ll lose eight pounds in a practice and as they fatigue their technique goes to (expletive), but their effort it still good. (Cole) Toner has looked good at times. Taylor Boggs was having a really good camp at guard and center before he got hurt, but nobody is at the level Earl is at.”Watford has kind of evolved into a crucial offensive lineman.“Very crucial. His value sometimes is higher than a starter. When you can play five positions as a backup, you’ll play a long time in this league. Sometimes you get in as a starter and you get exposed a little bit and everybody thinks you’re not as good as you really are and the value is not there. Having learned how to play center, started at right tackle, played guard, that’s a lot of value.” GLENDALE, Ariz. – Head coach Bruce Arians, now in his fourth year with the Arizona Cardinals, meets the media each day during training camp.Here, in this space, we’ll highlight many of the key topics and personnel conversations he has with reporters following the morning walk-through.“Ok, out for this game: Asa Jackson (leg), Michael Jenkins (hand), John Brown (concussion), Earl Watford (knee), Taylor Boggs (calf), Corey Peters (plantar fasciitis), Alani Fua (knee), Robert Nkemdiche (ankle) and Brittan Golden (hamstring). We got a couple of guys that are iffy: Cariel Brooks (quad), Jaxon Shipley (foot) and Olsen Pierre (unknown). Obviously, the guys who are on PUP are not coming off.center_img 0 Comments   Share   The 5: Takeaways from the Coyotes’ introduction of Alex Meruelo – / 24 Former Cardinals kicker Phil Dawson retires Grace expects Greinke trade to have emotional impactlast_img read more

MTV has launched a new app that combines ondemand

first_imgMTV has launched a new app that combines on-demand video content with social media.The MTV Under The Thumb (UTT) app gives access to premium MTV content on-demand and enables users to co-view the shows and chat with friends at the same time. The app can be paired with any web browser on a computer, enabling users to use their mobile phone as a remote control. They can also link with Facebook to share favourite shows and encourage others to watch them.Three levels of access are available via the app, each unlocking content from MTV brands including Jersey Shore, 16 & Pregnant and When I Was 17.The app has been developed by MTV owner Viacom International Media Networs Northern Europe and creative agency AKQA. It is initially available on Apple and Android devices in Belgium, Germany, Holland and Switzerland.Michel Dupont, senior vice-president, mobile brand licensing at VIMN said, “Today’s millennial generation is ‘always on’, works to its own schedule and watches TV in its own way. MTV fans are connected and driven by social media recommendations. MTV UTT is an extension of the 360 vision for our linear shows and increases our digital footprint enabling us to make our shows even more available to fans than before. It allows our fans to control MTV content on mobile and fixed devices, whilst providing an innovative co-viewing experience that enables them to simultaneously view and discuss on-demand content with their friends.”last_img read more

Richard Klein switched doctors last year The new

first_imgRichard Klein switched doctors last year. The new doctor put him on a new blood pressure drug. But it didn’t help. The failure was entirely predictable.Klein, an associate professor at Florida International University in Miami, realized later that he had tried the same medicine unsuccessfully a few years before, but he hadn’t remembered that fact during the appointment.It was an understandable mistake for Klein and his doctor.Klein’s prescription history was hidden somewhere in the hundreds of pages of medical records his new doctor had to go through.”If I had been able to go into an app sitting in his office and look through my prescription history, I would have known that, yeah, we tried that a couple years back and it didn’t work well,” he says.A feature like that will soon be available for some patients with iPhones.In the upcoming release of Apple’s iOS operating system for iPhones this spring, the Health app will include health records, so patients can take information about their immunizations, medications, lab results and more with them.The feature will first be available to patients of medical providers who partnered with Apple, including Johns Hopkins Medicine; OhioHealth; Ochsner Health System in Jefferson Parish, La.; and Cedars-Sinai in Los Angeles. It won’t cost those patients anything to use this feature, assuming they’re already iPhone users.Apple’s announcement says more medical facilities will offer this feature in the coming months.Some doctors hail it as a big shift away from patients having to handle a big pile of paper records every time they see a new doctor. But Google offered a similar service before and it failed. The search giant shut it down in 2012.Can Apple succeed where Google didn’t?Dr. Jonathan Slotkin says yes; he is a medical director handling digital patient engagement at Geisinger Health System in Pennsylvania, one of Apple’s partners. Unlike even a few years ago, a lot more people now use smartphones and the phones are more secure. There’s now also a technical standard for transferring electronic medical records.”Even if I get care at three different places and maybe they use three different electronic systems, now in one place that I possess in an encrypted way, I have all of that information at my fingertips,” he says.He adds this will make transferring information easier for patients who have to move, or go to a specialist.The health records feature could also change doctors’ habits in some ways, says Dr. Isaac Kohane, chair of the department of biomedical informatics at Harvard Medical School and a professor of pediatrics.”For some reason, and I say this as a physician, most physicians, if they don’t actually know how a test was done, somehow imagine it was done wrongly, and therefore repeat a test, not only at a cost but at some pain to the patient,” Kohane says. “If you have a reliable authoritative description of the test and its results, that uncertainty goes away and that excuse to repeat tests goes away as well.”Kohane called Apple’s new feature a “tectonic shift” in a commentary for member station WBUR’s CommonHealth.But Apple will have to address one big problem that Google had with Google Health, a similar health records service: It was popular with only a niche audience — tech-savvy patients and their caregivers, and fitness enthusiasts. The product didn’t attract a wide base of users.This time will be different, says Dr. Ida Sim, a co-director of biomedical informatics at the University of California, San Francisco Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute. Why? Because unlike with Google Health, patients no longer have to do the heavy lifting of entering or scanning their own data. Also, the 21st Century Cures Act of 2016 pushed federal agencies and providers to use electronic health records, and now there is a data standard for personal health records, which wasn’t the case in 2011.However, she writes in an email that wider adoption will still be an issue.”We’ll probably see huge numbers of people getting their initial Health Records populated. The issue is, then what?… The value will come from third party apps that use Health Records to provide meaningful value to patients, and until this value is demonstrated, I think Health Records uptake will be large but retention and continued engagement of patients will be challenging.”Alan Yu reports for The Pulse, WHYY’s health and science show. Copyright 2018 WHYY. To see more, visit WHYY.last_img read more

The explosion of deaths related to opioid misuse h

first_imgThe explosion of deaths related to opioid misuse has underscored a pressing need for better ways of treating pain, especially chronic pain.Duquesne University pharmacology associate professor Jelena Janjic thinks she’s on to one. It involves using a patient’s own immune system to deliver non-opioid pain medication to places in the body where there’s pain.Janjic’s idea, which draws from the field of cancer research, is to insert tiny amounts of over-the-counter pain medications into minute carriers called nanoparticles, and then inject these into pain patients. The medicines would then travel through the body to places where there is inflammation, and relieve the pain.Janjic has a special reason for wanting to develop new medicines for chronic pain: She suffers from it herself.”As a patient, I want an answer,” she says. “I want to figure out this.”There’s no question that the need for better, non-addictive medications is real and urgent. Researchers have come up with some ideas, but so far none has made it to market. Finding new treatments is difficult for any disease and it’s proving especially difficult for chronic pain because the underlying causes are poorly understood.Attempting to modulate inflammation as way to treat pain “is an active area of research,” says Michael L. Oshinsky, Program Director, Pain and Migraine, at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.Oshinsky says Janjic’s idea of targeting the immune system with nanoparticles carrying pain relievers makes sense, although he cautions that the relationship between inflammation and pain is not well understood.Janjic’s path to this research began in 2010. She has a doctorate in medicinal chemistry, and she had recently moved to Duquesne University where she had set up a lab focused on using nanomedicine techniques to treat cancer.What seemed like out of nowhere, of the blue, she started to suffer bouts of severe pain.”The one that hit me real hard was the whole body, from head to toe,” she says. “I’ve had on and off chronic pain since I was a teenager, but this was different.”In August that year, just before her students arrived back to school, she ended up in the emergency room with pain that was almost intolerable.The doctors’ diagnosis was discouraging. They told her she had a chronic pain syndrome. They said there wasn’t much they could do about it, and they said it was for life.The medicines they gave her helped with the pain somewhat, but left her feeling like she was living in a fog. She was having trouble remembering things, trouble taking notes.”Things were weird. So I decided I am going to do research on myself,” Janjic says.To control her own pain, she turned to mindfulness meditation and other non-medical interventions, including composing music and playing the piano. It’s not as if the pain magically went away, she says, but she was able to carry on with her life. Some days were worse than others.But she also wanted to find a medical solution.She made one important treatment decision early on: She didn’t want to take opioids for her pain.”At the time I could have got them very easily,” Janjic says. “I said, ‘What are you going to give me when I’m 67, or 87, if I take them now?’ I knew they don’t work long-term very well. So almost the refusal of opioids precipitated everything else that happened.”Looking for alternatives to opioids, she dove into the scientific literature, to learn all she could about chronic pain.Chronic pain syndromes are not well understood. With acute pain, it’s usually possible to identify the cause—an injury of some sort, or inflammation caused by an infection. Chronic pain may be linked to an initial mishap, but may persist long after the initial cause of the pain has disappeared. Sometimes there’s no good explanation of the pain at all, a frustrating circumstance for both doctor and patients.In addition to her research, Janjic started paying close attention to her own condition.”I started to understand that my body was actually inflamed,” she says.Inflammation occurs when our bodies’ immune system tries to deal with some damage, maybe from an invading virus or bacteria, and sends a barrage of immune cells to the affected area. On the one hand this is a good thing, since the cells fight the infection. But on the other, it can stimulate nerve cells in a particular part of the body, causing pain.Janjic also noticed something important about her pain: it varied both in intensity and in location. Sometimes it was in her knees, sometimes in her shoulders.She says none of the medicines available today responded to pain’s “diversity within the body.””I [started] to understand the fluctuation,” she says.She realized that the fluctuation meant more immune cells were going to the part of the body where the pain was. She figured if she could get pain medicine into immune cells, that medicine would ride with those cells to where it was needed.Before she got into pain research, Janjic was working on something called cancer nanomedicine. Cancer nanomedicines work by putting anti-cancer drugs into tiny containers called nanoparticles, and then injecting them into cancer patients, where they enter the patients’ immune cells.”So what did I already know how to do? Mess with the immune system with nanomedicines,” Janjic says. “And that’s how the idea of pain nanomedicine was born.”After many years of tinkering, she’s started to get positive results. In a recently published study, she showed that when researchers put a nonsteroidal, anti-inflammatory drug into a nanoparticle, and then injected that into a rat, it reduced the rat’s pain.Janjic says her approach doesn’t try to disable the immune cells.”You still want them to fight infection, you still want them to do what they’re supposed to do,” she says. “But we almost try to stop them from going into override and causing chronic pain.”Janjic, who is also the founder and co-director of the Chronic Pain Research Consortium at Duquesne University, is collaborating with several labs to try pairing different pain medications with different kinds of nano-particles to see what works best. So far progress is slow. And if one of the candidates shows real promise it will be years before anything can be tested in human patients and ultimately approved by the FDA.Janjic credits her own experience with pain for helping her gain a better understanding of pain and how to treat it. She thinks researchers would learn a lot from routinely talking to the people they’re trying to help.”My take home message is, ‘Ask the patient first,’ ” Janjic says. “Ask the kid who’s ten. Ask the grandpa with rheumatoid arthritis what that feels like. This is what I really want to see flourish. Maybe this already happening somewhere. If it is, I want to know. If you are inspiring your research this way, then I want to talk to you.” Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.last_img read more

Tesla Announces Huge Supercharger Expansion

first_imgTesla Tesla Announces Huge Supercharger Expansion Next Article Apply Now » Image credit: Tesla via PC Mag April 25, 2017 2 min read This story originally appeared on PCMag –sharescenter_img The only list that measures privately-held company performance across multiple dimensions—not just revenue. Matthew Humphries Add to Queue Senior Editor By the end of 2017, the number of Superchargers worldwide will have doubled, North America will have 150 percent more. 2019 Entrepreneur 360 List Tesla announced the Model 3 at the beginning of April last year. As an electric vehicle carrying the Tesla name and having a price tag starting at $35,000, it was sure to be extremely popular. One week after pre-orders opened, more than 325,000 reservations were placed, translating to roughly $14 billion of future sales revenue.That’s a lot of new electric cars, and Tesla realizes they’ll all need charging regularly. So ahead of the launch of the Model 3, it’s been announced that the Superchargers network is set to expand. Currently there are 5,431 Superchargers across Tesla’s global network of 842 Supercharger Stations. By the end of 2017 the goal is to get that total past 10,000. In a blog post titled, “Charging Is Our Priority,” Tesla explains that charging needs to be “convenient, abundant and reliable for all owners.” And so an aggressive expansion of the Supercharger network is necessary.As well as the Supercharger expansion, Destination Charging is also set to grow. These are the charging connections offered at public locations including hotels, restaurants and resorts. Currently there are around 9,000 Destination Charging connectors, but Tesla wants to reach 15,000 this year.In order to achieve this expansion, Tesla’s busiest Supercharging Stations are set to expand to allow “several dozen Teslas” to charge simultaneously. New Supercharging Stations will also be built, and purposefully located further away from highways so as to expand the network and support more owners in less busy areas. In North America alone, the expansion will increase the available Superchargers by 150 percent.Full details of existing Supercharger locations as well as planned expansion locations can be viewed on Tesla’s Supercharger global map.last_img read more

The Evidence Says Legal Marijuana Reduces Opioid Deaths But Chris Christie Wont

first_img He may soon be out as governor of New Jersey, but Chris Christie continues to have an impact on one of his favorite topics: the legalization of marijuana.He’s not for it. He made that clear once again this month. As chairman of a committee appointed by President Donald Trump to make recommendations on dealing with the nation’s opioid crisis, Christie took the opportunity to again attack cannabis legalization.In a letter submitted with a report from the Trump-appointed Commission on Combating Drug Addiction and the Opioid Crisis, Christie compared legalization of marijuana to the expanded use of opioids in the 1990s and early 2000s.“The Commission urges that the same mistake is not made with the uninformed rush to put another drug legally on the market in the midst of an overdose epidemic,” he wrote.Related: Entrepreneurs See Opportunity Addressing Consumer Demand for Pesticide-Free CannabisTrump commissionOn Oct. 26, Trump declared the opioid crisis a national public health emergency. The numbers are indeed staggering. According to the commission, 175 people die every day in the United States from drug overdose. “If a terrorist organization was killing 175 Americans a day on American soil, what would we do to stop them?” Christie wrote. “We would do anything and everything.”The commission made a number of recommendations. They include:A national multimedia campaign teaching children about the dangers of drugs and potential for addictionPlacing more nurses and counselors in elementary, middle and high schools to help at-risk studentsBlock grant federal funding for states to pay for anti-opioid programsProviding incentives for drug companies to develop non-opioid pain management drugsWhile marijuana has emerged as a possible alternative to opioids for pain management, the commission does not recommend its use. In his letter, Christie cited the National Institute on Drug Abuse research that found “marijuana use led to a 2 ½ times greater chance that the marijuana user would become an opioid user and abuser.“The commission found this very disturbing.”Others, however, have found the commission’s attack on marijuana itself disturbing.Related: New Jersey Voters Likely Just Approved Legalized MarijuanaDueling statisticsDr. Chinazo Cunningham, a professor of medicine at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, told CNN that “I was surprised to see negative language about marijuana in the opioid report.”Cunningham also said that actual research does not back up the claim in the report that marijuana use increases the chances of opioid addiction. Cunningham’s own research has found that in states where marijuana is legal, opioid overdose deaths fell by 25 percent.Cunningham noted that the continued illegality of marijuana under federal law has kept doctors and scientists from doing thorough research on the potential medical uses for marijuana.Sanjay Gupta, the chief medical correspondent for CNN, also said there is little evidence marijuana leads to abuse of harder drugs. However, alcohol and nicotine have proved to be indicators of future drug abuse, he said.To stay up to date on the latest marijuana related news make sure to like dispensaries.com on Facebook Easy Search. Quality Finds. Your partner and digital portal for the cannabis community. Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. –shares dispensaries.com 3 min read Christie, chairman of a presidential commission on the opioid addiction epidemic, links marijuana to overdose deaths despite all the evidence to the contrary and none in support. Guest Writer The Evidence Says Legal Marijuana Reduces Opioid Deaths But Chris Christie Won’t Believe It Add to Queue Image credit: Win McNamee | Getty Images Download Our Free Android App Next Article Free Green Entrepreneur App Cannabis Keep up with the latest trends and news in the cannabis industry with our free articles and videos, plus subscribe to the digital edition of Green Entrepreneur magazine. November 21, 2017last_img read more

TechSavvy and FashionForward A Look at Todays Stylish Startups

first_img Guest Writer Add to Queue Small Business Heroes Tech-Savvy and Fashion-Forward: A Look at Today’s Stylish Startups 5 min read Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. Free Webinar | July 31: Secrets to Running a Successful Family Business Hukkster co-founders Erica Bell (left) and Katie Finnegan. The fashion business is notoriously tough to break into.Even Gianni Versace spent years working as a dress-maker’s apprentice before starting up his own eponymous and uber-famous fashion house Gianni Versace.But the newest crowd of fashionista entrepreneurs aren’t sweating it out over sketchbooks and dress samples. Between rewarding users for style advice and supplying them with their own virtual closets, today’s fashionable young founders are using technology to tap into customers’ penchant for new looks. And they’re not heading for the runway either; they’re launching where their customers are: online.We checked in with some of the most innovative — and stylish — startups around. Here’s how three of them are standing out in the ever fickle-fashion world:Pramod Dabir and the inspiration for Boutine, his wife.image credit: FashinvestBoutineHQ: San FranciscoFounded: Aug., 2012Like most businesses, social-shopping site Boutine started with a personal experience. Founder Pramod Dabir, 28, lived with his fiancé — along with six other women — while she was studying at Stanford. These women would run into each other’s rooms and ask each other ‘How does this look?’ ‘Does it match,’ he recalls. One girl was more fashionable and would be doling out a lot of advice. When Dabir noticed that the women were making purchasing decisions based on what the fashionista friend advised, he began building a platform that would enable users to be financially rewarded for sharing their style and sartorial savvy.Related: Website Makes Boutique Fashions Available AnywhereToday, users receive a 10 percent commission on the sale of whatever products they recommend. We have a robust back end system that allows us to handle all of the splitting of commissions and processing of sales, he says. I wanted to create a place for women to share their voice about fashion and be compensated for it, says Dabir.But the other element that sets Boutine apart from traditional fashion companies? Engagement. The site allows users to become stylists — creating their own virtual boutiques and recommending designers and apparel pulled from the site’s inventory. It also offers users the ability to style outfits, dragging and dropping different items into their boutique, rotating them and adding embellishments. Users don’t have to necessarily buy the products, but they can engage with them, he says.Rohan Deuskar, co-founder of StyliticsStyliticsHQ: New York CityFounded: Nov., 2011How well brands and retailers know their customers is top of mind for Rohan Deuskar, 30, the co-founder of Stylitics, a tracking and organization service for consumers’ closets. As we talked to merchants and designers in the fashion space, we found that the tools they were using to know what’s in their customer’s closet or shopping bag was very old-fashioned, says Deuskar. It was all focus groups and surveys.Deuskar immediately recognized an opportunity: to allow users to create a virtual closet — through which they could list clothes they’d like to buy, as well as plan their outfits for the week. They could also analyze how much they’re paying per wear (a.k.a., the justification for paying top dollar for jeans) and make sure they don’t wear anything twice.Related: David Segal on DAVIDsTEA: North America’s Next Starbucks?But brands can also bank on the service. Users’ data are gathered and delivered, anonymously, to brands and retailers who pay for the information. We can get a clear picture of everyday clothing choices and the patterns that are emerging, says Deuskar. My vision is that in a couple of years, when you walk into your favorite store, you’ll get a personal experience around patterns, style and price points that you care about.Hukkster co-founders Erica Bell (left) and Katie Finnegan.image credit: WSJHukksterHQ: New York CityFounded: Dec., 2011It’s well known that online shoppers break for bargains. So, it would seem upstart fashion-deals site Hukkster is bound to strike a chord.When consumers find a product online that they want to buy, they simply ‘hukk it’ and then they’ll get a notification by email or text when the price of that item drops by at least 25 percent. The concept for the company came from the co-founders’ collective love of fashion — the duo met in 2007 while working as merchandisers at J. Crew — and the fact that they felt bombarded by special offers and deals piling up in their in-boxes, says co-founder Erica Bell, 27. Bell and her co-founder, Katie Finnegan, 29, wanted to offer users the ability to be alerted to deals at their favorite stores, like the Gap and Bloomingdale’s, in one email. In turn, the startup receives a fee whenever a sale is made via Hukkster.Related: Silicon Valley’s Best Dressed (Photos)Like their fashionable counterparts, Hukkster’s founders say the site also relies heavily on engaging with users. Right now, we’re focusing on apparel and accessories, but we’re just at the tip of the iceberg, says Bell. Our end goal would be for people to be able to ‘Hukk everything on the web.Why do you think fashion startups are becoming so tech savvy? Let us know in the comments section below.center_img Lambeth Hochwald –shares Next Article October 25, 2012 Image credit: WSJ Learn how to successfully navigate family business dynamics and build businesses that excel. Register Now »last_img read more

OpenText Streamlines the Way Enterprises Digitally Communicate with Customers

first_imgOpenText, a global leader in Enterprise Information Management (EIM), announced version 16.6 is generally available now and will be launched in July 2019 at its annual user conference, OpenText Enterprise World. Innovations in its market-leading customer communications management solution, OpenText Exstream, are being previewed at Document Strategy Forum 2019 (DSF ’19). The conference is held May 7-9 in Anaheim, Calif.OpenText Exstream 16.6 introduces self-service, browser-based design, authoring and interactive editing, which helps free marketing, business and other non-technical users to compose and edit their own HTML5 templates without technical assistance or additional coding. Marketers will be able to eliminate process bottlenecks and save time in creating and deploying high-quality, responsive and compliant digital communications to customers, while reducing the burden on enterprise IT departments.Organizations that rely on Exstream will also benefit from new customer journey modeling. Users who own the customer journey may graphically model the creation and delivery steps for all communications using an intuitive, web-based drag-and-drop visual interface. Line of business process owners, who have the greatest understanding of their customers, may now define what type of outputs to produce, how to deliver those outputs across all channels and what to do if delivery fails.Marketing Technology News: Amazon or Alibaba: Freedonia Compares These Global E-Commerce Leaders“The ability to quickly and effectively communicate with customers via their preferred digital channels is critical to marketers responsible for customer experience,” said Guy Hellier, Vice President of Product Management for Customer Experience Management (CEM) at OpenText. “Demand for technical assistance with digital communication often outpaces IT resources. With Exstream, business users are able to design HTML5 responsive communication flows that help them meet regulatory requirements and accommodate all devices. This enables faster time to market for new offers, reduces operational costs and optimizes customer engagement.”Exstream 16.6 innovations will be launched at Enterprise World in Toronto July 9 – 11. The conference helps businesses address the power of enterprise information management (EIM) to gain the information advantage.Marketing Technology News: China’s Most Valuable Brands Grow a Record 30% to $889.7 Billion in 2019 BrandZ Top 100 Most Valuable Chinese Brands Ranking – With Alibaba the New Number OneOpenText CCM solutions help businesses build better customer experiences across all touchpoints. Exstream is used by more than 5,000 enterprises worldwide to drive profitable lifetime customer relationships. Exstream was recognized as a leading CCM solution in the 2018 Aspire Leaderboard for Customer Communications.OpenText will also be showcasing innovations in its Intelligent Forms Automation solution, OpenText LiquidOffice, and latest advances in Content Services at DSF ’19. These solutions reflect the company’s ongoing commitment to helping enterprises deliver rich and streamlined digital experiences for customers.Marketing Technology News: Persistent Systems Joins Siemens’ MindSphere Partner Program to Bring Industrial IoT Solutions to Market OpenText Streamlines the Way Enterprises Digitally Communicate with Customers PRNewswireMay 8, 2019, 1:11 pmMay 8, 2019 customer experience managementDocument Strategy ForumEnterprise information managementIntelligent Forms AutomationMarketing TechnologyNewsOpenText Previous ArticlePipeliner Partners With Daniel Strunk of DePaul University to Release Sales Strategy & Technology Online CourseNext ArticleSAP Offers Partners Free Access to Test and Demo Systems on SAP S/4HANA Cloud and the SAP C/4HANA Suitelast_img read more

ICF Next Named a Strong Performer Among Loyalty Service Providers

first_imgAgency Among Top Scorers in Loyalty Strategy, Insights, Privacy and Security, Change Management and Account ManagementICF Next, the integrated marketing and communications services group of ICF, announced that it was named a “Strong Performer” among loyalty service providers by leading global research and advisory firm Forrester Research in The Forrester Wave™: Loyalty Service Providers, Q3 2019.“Clients are very satisfied with ICF Next’s insights services and account teams, offering high praise for its intelligence, consistency and investment in client success,” the report stated. One reference shared that [ICF Next] “exceeded our expectations on every count.”Marketing Technology News: Mono Solutions Joins Bauer Media Group to Strengthen SME Marketing Services Across the GlobeThe agency was evaluated across multiple criteria and received the highest possible rating in five: loyalty strategy services, customer insights services, privacy and security, account management and change management tools and services.Earlier in 2019, ICF Next was recognized as a “Leader” in another loyalty report focused on technology platforms, The Forrester Wave™: Loyalty Technology Platforms, Q2 2019. The agency believes that placement in both reports underscores its ability to provide both an industry-leading loyalty technology platform as well as strategic guidance and services to clients that establish and enhance the customer experience. ICF Next’s loyalty technology, Tally, drives emotional and behavioral brand loyalty through personalized interactions and powers programs for some of the world’s leading hospitality, travel, retail and restaurant brands.“We are proud of these recent Forrester designations and believe they validate our loyalty technology, services and strategy, and the value we bring to brands,” said John Armstrong, president of ICF Next. “We are in the position to work with brands based on their needs as both a comprehensive partner and a partner in key areas such as strategy or technology.”Marketing Technology News: Paysafe Announces YouTube PartnershipThis recognition by Forrester is the latest in a series of awards, recognitions and accolades secured by ICF Next in the last eight months alone. The agency was recently named a Top 10 Agency by customer loyalty association Loyalty360, and was awarded Digital PR Agency of the Year by the Holmes Report. ICF Next was also credited with 12 Cannes Lions, and was named a “Strong Performer” in The Forrester Wave™: Midsize Digital Experience Agencies, Q4 2018.ICF Next brings together ICF’s global award-winning marketing, communications and associated technology expertise, offering clients a full set of capabilities in strategy and transformation, insight and analytics, creative engagement, technology and channels, and loyalty and customer marketing.Marketing Technology News: Gartner Survey Shows Inside Sales Organizations Risk Losing 24% of Employees This Year Customer MarketingICFLoyalty Service ProvidersMarketing Technology NewsNews Previous ArticleGlassbox Announces Strategic Partnership with MicrosoftNext ArticleTapcart Fuels the Future of Mobile Commerce with $4 Million in Funding from Greycroft ICF Next Named a Strong Performer Among Loyalty Service Providers PRNewswire3 hours agoJuly 23, 2019 last_img read more

Tactile and proprioceptive stimulation improves effects of perinatal brain injuries in mice

first_img Source:https://www.uab.cat/web/newsroom/news-detail/sensory-stimuli-improves-brain-damage-in-mouse-models-of-preterm-birth-1345668003610.html?noticiaid=1345783627431 Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Mar 5 2019A research conducted by the INc-UAB shows that the same perinatal brain injury caused by hypoxia and ischemia have differentiated effects on each gender, but can be improved through tactile and proprioceptive stimuli. Petting and massaging the mice in the first stages of their life provided neurological protection in their adult life, especially in male mice in which the injury was reduced by half.Perinatal brain injuries hinder neurological capabilities throughout life, causing anything from fine motor problems to severe cognitive limitations. At the same time, therapy treatments currently available are very limited. That is why other types of interventions to help counter these effects are being explored.Now, a new study by researchers from the Institute of Neuroscience of the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (INc-UAB), led by Dr Lydia Giménez-Llort, demonstrates that tactile and proprioceptive stimulation -related to the tactile perception and that of the body’s own position, muscle bone, balance and coordination of movements- improves the effects of perinatal hypoxic and ischemic brain injuries throughout the life of the mice. This improvement mainly benefits male mice, in which the neurological damage is reduced by half.The study, published in Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience, was conducted with mouse models of preterm birth. “We currently know that the immature brain of preterm infants, equivalent to that of mice when born, is at a larger risk for hypoxic-ischemic damage, and male newborns are more susceptible and respond worse to protective and therapeutic interventions”, co-author of the study Mireia Recasens points out. “Our work provides important information on this serious health problem with a damage of 1-3.5 and 6 of every thousand births in developed and developing countries, respectively”.Sensory stimulation was applied from before the injury occurred until the final stages of infancy, a period in preterm infants equivalent to being born at seven months until two years. The manipulation consisted in tactile and propioceptive stroking and massaging of the mice three times within an eight-minute period, twice a day.The results revealed that this intervention had a notable neurological protection on both genders throughout their lives, but researchers highlight that the effects were especially positive among males. The histopathological analysis in males demonstrated 50% less brain damage compared to the non-stimulated mice. There was a 30% decrease among female mice. The neurological protection in both genders was correlated to the improvement of functional capacities, reflexes, and an improvement in memory results.In relation to brain areas, the region involved with motor control and learning and memory (caudate/putamen) was the one to register the largest difference in males, with 80% less damage. In females, the main improvement was a 66% reduction in atrophy to the corpus callosum, a nerve tract connecting the left and right brain hemispheres.Related StoriesStudy provides new insight into longitudinal decline in brain network integrity associated with agingRepurposing a heart drug could increase survival rate of children with ependymomaNeural pathways explain the relationship between imagination and willingness to help”The study illustrates the preventive and therapeutic potential of these types of stimulations in newborns with brain injuries, in a short yet very intense period at levels of brain development and plasticity. It also gives support to the different scientific approaches advocating for the transcendence of perinatal conditions – from sensory stimulation to maternal contact and a warm and protective environment – and its role as an adjuvant to current therapies”, highlights Dr Giménez-Llort, who is also a member of the International Gender Medicine (IGM) and the ISNA, an international association of sensory stimulation and snoezelen, which studies its effects.One same injury with different effects according to genderThe research also analyzed for the first time the impact of perinatal hypoxic and ischemic brain injuries, demonstrating that although the same degree of neuropathological severity exists, the damage affects each gender’s functional, neurological, cognitive and emotional capacities differently depending on the stage of life and task undertaken.”During the infant stage, the damage affects balance, particularly among females, and prehension in males, but both aspects improve as they grow and only reflexes remain damaged. Male mice showed to have infantile hyperactivity, which normalizes as they became adults. In contrast, the anxiety and emotional traits of these injuries lasted throughout their lives. Both genders showed poorer learning processes at short and long terms, but there was more damage to memory among the males”, explains Aida Muntsant, PhD student at the INc-UAB and first author of the paper. The functional evaluations were correlated with the degree of severity of the affected brain areas: hippocampus, caudate/putamen, thalamus, neocortex and corpus callosum.Rehabilitation targets”As a whole, the study shows the different neuronal substrates needed to satisfy functional demands and points to the most resilient neuroanatomical targets to repair these functions through postnatal stimulation”, points out Dr Kalpana Shrisvastava, specialist in neuroimmunology and co-first author of the paper.”Despite the obvious differences between rodents and humans, the study shows the complex relationship between different regions of the brain, risk factors, vulnerability and resilience, and all dependant on gender and age. It also provides new data on behavioral neuroscience within the field of neonatology and the area of pediatric functional rehabilitation, defining a translational scenario in which to study the underlying mechanisms of the functional and neuropathological correlates found”, concludes Dr Lydia Giménez-Llort.last_img read more

Why your perception of old changes as you age

first_img This article was reprinted from khn.org with permission from the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. Kaiser Health News, an editorially independent news service, is a program of the Kaiser Family Foundation, a nonpartisan health care policy research organization unaffiliated with Kaiser Permanente. Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jun 11 2019My perception of old age is inextricably linked to my grandmother. When I was a kid, I thought this 65-year-old, white-haired woman whose entire body wobbled when she walked was very old. Now that I’m 66, my personal perception — or perhaps, misperception — of old age has changed. I suspect I’ve got lots of company.Many of us are convinced that while everyone else is aging, that person we see in the mirror every morning is magically aging at a somehow slower pace. The age confusion can start early. A 2018 Michigan State University online survey of respondents ages 10 to 89 revealed that most think middle age begins at 30 — and that old age begins at, OMG, 50.Another study, from the University of Zurich, published in 2011, determined that older adults often try to avoid the negative stereotypes of their age group by distancing themselves from their age group. Yet another study, from Columbia University, in 2018 found considerable evidence that when confronted with negative age stereotypes, older adults tend to distance and dissociate themselves from this negative stereotype.Call it what you will, but this gray-haired group of boomers and beyond — myself included — is having a hard time accepting the realities of aging. Yes, we are mortal, but we’re not quite believing it. The great irony, say experts on aging, is that this flirtation with a slightly different reality from our aging peers may, in fact, be a healthy thing.”Baby boomers are redefining what aging is and what old age looks like,” said Jennifer Ailshire, assistant professor at the Leonard Davis School of Gerontology at the University of Southern California. William Chopik, assistant professor of psychology and principal investigator of the Michigan State study, knows this better than most of us.”People — particularly older people — usually say they feel younger than they are,” said Chopik. “People who report feeling younger actually tend to live longer and healthier lives — and they don’t tend to have as much of a pattern of decline.”In most cases, people say they feel about 20% younger than they really are, according to the Michigan State study of more than 500,000 people. This keeps ramping up as folks age, he said. Beginning at age 50, he said, many say they feel about 10 years younger.The fact we’re generally living longer than we used to also plays a role, experts say. “As our life spans get longer, so does our view of old age,” said Chopik. “How we view ourselves changes constantly as we age.”For me, it’s been more like a sentence to self-motivate. At age 66, when I look in the mirror, I may not see a 46-year-old staring back at me — but, perhaps, someone closer to 56. Maybe it’s because I’m so lousy at sitting still. I’m out walking my dog at 6:15 a.m., lifting weights in the gym by 7:30 a.m. and swimming laps in the pool before 9 a.m. five days a week. Welcome to my nonstop world that seems to somehow keep old age partially in check.While it might not sound like your world, consider Theresa Paulus — the mother-in-law of USC’s Ailshire — who seems to be constantly in motion, too.The 63-year-old Tempe, Ariz., resident’s morning bicycle workout, alone, makes my daily workout schedule look lame. She’s typically up by 5 a.m. and quickly out on her Trek bike for the next hour — or more — on a 10-mile-long excursion. If the weather is lousy, she’ll instead find her way to the spinning class at the local gym before heading to the weight room.Related StoriesCombining aerobic exercise and resistance training helps obese older adults preserve muscle massResearchers identify molecular pathway underpinning exercise and improved motor learningImplanted device uses microcurrent to exercise heart muscle in cardiomyopathy patients”I honestly feel like I’m in my 40s,” said the full-time nursing home caregiver, who three years ago, at age 60, got her degree in health service management from Arizona State University. “I haven’t slowed down one bit from the exercise routine I did at 40.”In fact, she may have upped it a bit. Not the distance, mind you, but every day she tries to challenge herself a bit. “Each time I ask myself, can I get there and back just a little bit faster?” she said. She may be passing it along to the next generation, too, as she has taught her two granddaughters how to ride bikes.Paulus’ ability to rebound from injuries is legendary among friends and family. On a recent walking tour of Ireland’s Cliffs of Moher, she twisted her ankle but continued days of walking — only to discover when she got home that she’d broken her foot. Back in 1969, while training on her bike, she was hit by a car — but escaped without so much as one broken bone. And after a moped accident in 2010, she crushed her leg and was advised by her doctor that she’d always walk with a limp — and a cane. She proved the doctor wrong and was soon racing bikes again.Her daughter-in-law, USC’s Ailshire, isn’t surprised by any of this. After all, she said, some baby boomers’ bodies can perform as if they are between two and 15 years younger than their actual age.Paola Sebastiani, 55, is living proof. She barely qualifies as a baby boomer, but when asked how old she feels, the professor of biostatistics at Boston University said she doesn’t even feel 40.Perhaps that’s because she walks 2 miles (in Birkenstock sandals, no less) to and from work every weekday. Or maybe it’s because she’s adamant about eating no red meat and tries to eat avocado daily. Or perhaps it’s her who-gives-a-flip attitude. “My mom would have never worn jeans at my age — but I wear them all the time,” she said. Her point: Folks with a positive attitude toward aging often age more slowly.Which brings us back to my dear grandmother. The most familiar smell from her kitchen was that of the fried chicken crackling on the front burner every Friday evening. I can’t remember even once seeing her exercise. Action, in her world, was a game of cards. And, as was all too common in her day, she thought her smoking habit helped her to relax.Is it any wonder she was old at 65?So, at 66, I’ve given up on most fried foods. I’ve never smoked. I don’t sit around much playing cards or watching TV. And all the time I spent walking our dog, lifting weights and swimming laps this morning I view as an invisible shield that protects me from looking into the mirror and seeing an old man staring back.Instead, I still see me.last_img read more

Rush University Medical Center offers new FDAapproved treatment for brain aneurysms

first_imgAn aneurysm is an enlarged, weakened area of an artery that is bulging or ballooned. If left untreated, it may rupture, often resulting in severe disability, cognitive loss or death.An estimated six million people in the United States have an unruptured brain aneurysm.Wide-necked bifurcation aneurysms occur at a point in an artery where it branches into two arteries and account for 35 percent of all brain aneurysms.The WEB device is made from ultra-fine wires braided together to form a flexible, self-expanding mesh that effectively plugs the aneurysm.During the WEB system procedure, a small catheter is threaded through a tiny incision in the groin area and threaded through the patient’s arteries to the aneurysm site.Using fluoroscopy imaging, the surgeon deploys the WEB device into the sac of the aneurysm where the flexible mesh conforms to the aneurysm walls, minimizing blood flow inside the aneurysm. In comparison to the current mainstay of endovascular treatment in which multiple coils are placed inside the aneurysm, only one WEB is required for an aneurysm.Related StoriesMercy Medical Center adds O-arm imaging system to improve spinal surgery resultsNeural pathways explain the relationship between imagination and willingness to helpStudy offers clues about how to prevent brain inflammation in Alzheimer’sIn most cases, over time, the body seals off the neck of the aneurysm, essentially curing it.”If we can fix the aneurysm before it ruptures, then the threat of this aneurysm bursting and the patient dying from it essentially goes away,” said Crowley.The WEB device allows doctors to treat wide-necked aneurysms without the need for placing stents in the brain, which keeps patients off of post-procedure blood thinning medications, such as Plavix, that are used for stents. The new device also shortens endovascular procedure time in treating aneurysms compared to alternative therapies.In clinical testing, the WEB system was shown to be highly effective and safer than other options.The minimally invasive nature of the procedure means most patients are able to go home the next day.In addition to unruptured aneurysms, the WEB system may be used in some cases in which the aneurysm has already ruptured, potentially providing more desirable options for treatment.”Before this device was available, ruptured wide-necked aneurysms often required open-brain surgery to clip the aneurysm as a stent is not ideal in those patients because of the need for blood thinners,” said Crowley. “This device will let us endovascularly treat a much larger number of aneurysms than we ever have before, and fewer patients may need surgical clipping of their aneurysm”. Source:Rush University Medical Center This new device is a game changer for patients with complex brain aneurysms. Prior to this major advent in endovascular therapy, treatment was often more risky and difficult for a substantial number of those patients.”Dr. Webster Crowley, chief of cerebrovascular and endovascular neurosurgery at Rush Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jul 12 2019Rush University Medical Center is offering a newly FDA-approved treatment for brain aneurysms that is safer for patients and has a shorter recovery period than other treatments.Rush is the first academic medical center in Illinois and the first comprehensive stroke center in the state to offer the Woven EndoBridge (WEB) Aneurysm Embolization System, a minimally invasive option for treating wide-neck bifurcation aneurysms in certain areas of the brain.last_img read more

Neural pathways explain the relationship between imagination and willingness to help

first_imgIf we are able to vividly imagine helping someone, then we think we’re more likely to actually do it. Imagining the scenery surrounding the situation can also prompt people to take the perspective of the people in the situation who need help, which in turn prompts prosocial action.”Liane Young, Associate Professor of Psychology, director of the Morality Lab, Boston College Reviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Jul 12 2019In those split seconds when people witness others in distress, neural pathways in the brain support the drive to help through facets of imagination that allow people to see the episode as it unfolds and envision how to aid those in need, according to a team of Boston College researchers.The underlying process at work is referred to as episodic simulation, essentially the ability of individuals to re-organize memories from the past into a newly-imagined event simulated in the mind.Neuroimaging helped the researchers identify multiple neural pathways that explain the relationship between imagination and the willingness to help others, researchers from Boston College and the University of Albany, SUNY, reported recently in the journal Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience.The team explored two separate brain regions with different functions: the right temporoparietal junction (RTPJ), a key brain region thought to be involved in representing the minds of other people, also known as “perspective-taking”; and the medial temporal lobe (MTL) subsystem, a set of brain regions that support the simulation of imagined scenes.The study discovered evidence for the direct impact of scene imagery on willingness to help, according to Boston College Associate Professor of Psychology Liane Young, a co-author and the principal investigator on the project. While study participants imagined helping scenes, neural activity in MTL predicted overall willingness to help the person in need, according to the article, “A role for the medial temporal lobe subsystem in guiding prosociality: the effect of episodic processes on willingness to help others,” which was published in the journal’s April 14 edition. This may be because of a phenomenon known as imagination inflation, where humans use the vividness of their imagination as a kind of cue to estimate the likelihood of an event, according to the co-authors, which also included former BC postdoctoral researcher Brendan Gaesser, now an assistant professor of psychology at the University of Albany, SUNY, research assistants Joshua Hirschfeld-Kroen and Emily A. Wasserman, and undergraduate research assistant Mary Horn.Related StoriesPosterior parietal cortex plays crucial role in making decisions, research showsRepurposing a heart drug could increase survival rate of children with ependymomaAn active brain and body associated with reduced risk of dementiaThe team set out to learn how the capacity to simulate imagined and remembered scenes of helping motivate individuals to form more altruistic intentions. The goal was to uncover the cognitive and neural mechanisms that explain the relationship between episodic simulation and the enhanced willingness to help those in need.In the first experiment, which allowed the team to look at both brain regions, the researchers collected functional brain images as people imagined and remembered helping others in hypothetical scenarios. In the second experiment, while people were imagining helping another person, the team used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to disrupt activity in their right temporoparietal junction (RTPJ), a key brain region thought to be involved in representing the minds of other people.Neuroimaging revealed that the willingness to help was also predicted by activity in the RTPJ, a critical node that’s involved in taking the perspective of other people, according to the researchers. However, in the second experiment, when the team used TMS to temporarily inhibit activity in the RTPJ, they found that the altruistic effect of vividly imagining helping remained significant, suggesting that this effect doesn’t depend exclusively on perspective-taking.”We had initially expected that higher neural activity in the medial temporal lobe subsystem would be associated with a greater willingness to help,” the team reported. “Surprisingly, we found the opposite: the more activity a person had in their MTL subsystem while they were imagining helping scenes, the less willing they were to help the person in need.”This contradiction may be explained by lower MTL activity reflecting greater ease of imagining episodes, and that ease of imagination means that participants are more willing to help. Consistent with this account, the team found that when participants reported finding it easier to imagine or remember helping episodes, they also tended to report being more willing to help the person in need.Young and Gaesser recently found in a separate study, led by BC postdoctoral researcher Jaclyn Ford and Professor Elizabeth Kensinger, that vividly remembering helping was associated with making more generous donations in the wake of the 2013 Boston Marathon bombing. Next steps in the research will further connect the lab’s neuroimaging approach with measures of real-world altruistic behavior. Source:Boston CollegeJournal reference:Gaesser, B. et al. (2019) A role for the medial temporal lobe subsystem in guiding prosociality: the effect of episodic processes on willingness to help others. Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience. doi.org/10.1093/scan/nsz014.last_img read more