Things to know: Joe Thornton reaches another milestone with Sharks

first_imgSAN JOSE — Another day at the rink, another remarkable milestone in Sharks territory.After witnessing the franchise’s 1,000th win (Jan. 10), Brent Burns’ 1,000th game (Dec. 27), Joe Thornton’s 1,500th game (Nov. 8) and the alternate captain’s 400th goal (Nov. 13), Sharks fans will be treated to another rare feat at SAP Center Tuesday. Thornton will suit up for his 1,000th game with the Sharks, joining Patrick Marleau on the list of players who’ve made it that far in a teal jersey when his team …last_img read more

Assam to be oil exporting hub for Southeast Asia

first_imgAssam is slated to soon become one of India’s major oil exporting hubs catering to the eastern neighbours of the country and Southeast Asia, Petroleum Minister Dharmendra Pradhan said on Friday.The Minister based his prediction on a slew of projects for augmenting oil exploration, refining and transportation capacity in various stages of completion in the region. Eight of these projects under Hydrocarbon Vision 2030, worth more than ₹1,500 crore, were inaugurated in Guwahati. “Assam will soon send petrol and diesel to Bangladesh, Bhutan, Myanmar, and Southeast Asian countries,” Mr. Pradhan said.last_img read more

Congress doesn’t want President’s rule in Maharashtra, says Ashok Chavan

first_imgThe Congress in Maharashtra on Sunday said it didn’t want President’s Rule in the State which is in the midst of a political crisis in view of the BJP’s announcement that it would not form government. Senior Congress leader Ashok Chavan said newly-elected MLAs of the party will seek advice from the party high-command over its future political stand in the State. “We are in Jaipur. We will discuss the issue here and will seek advice for the future political stand. The party doesn’t want president’s rule in the state,” he told reporters. Mr. Chavan said he was in favour of forming a stable government in Maharashtra.last_img read more

Bruce Arians chats with offensive coordinator Haro

first_imgBruce Arians chats with offensive coordinator Harold Goodwin on practice Tuesday, Aug. 9, 2016. (Adam Green/Arizona Sports) “Look forward to taking the pads off today. Had a great practice yesterday; bounced back extremely well. Take the pads off today, work on the Raiders for the young guys—they’ll get most of the work today so that they can put on the best performance they can in their first big evaluation.”Will you be calling plays in the preseason?“No, Harold (Goodwin) will have it all; the game plan the whole way. I’ll do game three.”So if you’re not calling plays what will you be doing on the sidelines?“Deciding if we got for it on fourth or go for two. Tough job. Somebody got to do it.”Does that free you up to chew more people out?“Yeah, they wish I was more involved in that part of it … especially the referees.”Do you see David Johnson still being involved in special teams?“Yeah, probably. A bunch of our starters are involved in special teams.”With Jake Coker, can you fix his mechanics?“You can quicken feet. It’s hard to change deliveries but you can tweak things and he’s gotten better of getting the ball out of his hand faster, and when he does get it out fast he’s pretty accurate.”Do you see this as Matt Barkley’s first real shot to show you what he’s got? Top Stories Have you noticed things getting chippy as camp grows longer“No, we don’t have any pushing and shoving. They’re just tired of listening to each other. Two days ago they weren’t going hard enough to get chippy. Yesterday was a lot better.”The training camp schedule is going to change some here in the next week. Are you looking to see how the team responds?“It’s great for us because the way our schedule goes during the season, you get into a routine and you fall into a routine. Once you start changing routines, I think that’s very good for a football team to see how they handle change of routine. Usually, if you play every Sunday at 1 o’clock, you ain’t very good. If you’re playing Thursday night, Sunday night, Monday night, change of schedules, you’re a pretty good football team. You have to learn to adapt, getting flexed, all those things that happen in the end of the season and we’ll go through some of that next week. I would’ve liked to have scheduled another team this week to work against, something we’ll look into in the future. Anxious to see how the two practices (Sunday and Monday) go outside next week to see if that’s a possibility to bring another team here and practice early in the morning.” Derrick Hall satisfied with D-backs’ buying and selling “Well, no, every practice is a chance to show me what you got. This is the first test to show everybody else what he’s got. Every practice you’re being evaluated in preparation, everything.”Has either one of those two quarterbacks stepped up to be the No. 3 guy?“Not yet. They both have potential to.”Is there a chance you would only keep two quarterbacks on the 53-man roster?“We have in the past plenty of times. It’s going to come down to who’s the best player, not the position. It’s just who’s the best player.”Have you seen enough consistency in your second- and third-team offensive linemen?“Not really. Antoine (McClain) has flashed a number of days and as he gets tired his technique goes down a little bit. John (Wetzel) is the same way. They’re both extremely heavy sweaters. They’ll lose eight pounds in a practice and as they fatigue their technique goes to (expletive), but their effort it still good. (Cole) Toner has looked good at times. Taylor Boggs was having a really good camp at guard and center before he got hurt, but nobody is at the level Earl is at.”Watford has kind of evolved into a crucial offensive lineman.“Very crucial. His value sometimes is higher than a starter. When you can play five positions as a backup, you’ll play a long time in this league. Sometimes you get in as a starter and you get exposed a little bit and everybody thinks you’re not as good as you really are and the value is not there. Having learned how to play center, started at right tackle, played guard, that’s a lot of value.” GLENDALE, Ariz. – Head coach Bruce Arians, now in his fourth year with the Arizona Cardinals, meets the media each day during training camp.Here, in this space, we’ll highlight many of the key topics and personnel conversations he has with reporters following the morning walk-through.“Ok, out for this game: Asa Jackson (leg), Michael Jenkins (hand), John Brown (concussion), Earl Watford (knee), Taylor Boggs (calf), Corey Peters (plantar fasciitis), Alani Fua (knee), Robert Nkemdiche (ankle) and Brittan Golden (hamstring). We got a couple of guys that are iffy: Cariel Brooks (quad), Jaxon Shipley (foot) and Olsen Pierre (unknown). Obviously, the guys who are on PUP are not coming off.center_img 0 Comments   Share   The 5: Takeaways from the Coyotes’ introduction of Alex Meruelo – / 24 Former Cardinals kicker Phil Dawson retires Grace expects Greinke trade to have emotional impactlast_img read more

MTV has launched a new app that combines ondemand

first_imgMTV has launched a new app that combines on-demand video content with social media.The MTV Under The Thumb (UTT) app gives access to premium MTV content on-demand and enables users to co-view the shows and chat with friends at the same time. The app can be paired with any web browser on a computer, enabling users to use their mobile phone as a remote control. They can also link with Facebook to share favourite shows and encourage others to watch them.Three levels of access are available via the app, each unlocking content from MTV brands including Jersey Shore, 16 & Pregnant and When I Was 17.The app has been developed by MTV owner Viacom International Media Networs Northern Europe and creative agency AKQA. It is initially available on Apple and Android devices in Belgium, Germany, Holland and Switzerland.Michel Dupont, senior vice-president, mobile brand licensing at VIMN said, “Today’s millennial generation is ‘always on’, works to its own schedule and watches TV in its own way. MTV fans are connected and driven by social media recommendations. MTV UTT is an extension of the 360 vision for our linear shows and increases our digital footprint enabling us to make our shows even more available to fans than before. It allows our fans to control MTV content on mobile and fixed devices, whilst providing an innovative co-viewing experience that enables them to simultaneously view and discuss on-demand content with their friends.”last_img read more

Richard Klein switched doctors last year The new

first_imgRichard Klein switched doctors last year. The new doctor put him on a new blood pressure drug. But it didn’t help. The failure was entirely predictable.Klein, an associate professor at Florida International University in Miami, realized later that he had tried the same medicine unsuccessfully a few years before, but he hadn’t remembered that fact during the appointment.It was an understandable mistake for Klein and his doctor.Klein’s prescription history was hidden somewhere in the hundreds of pages of medical records his new doctor had to go through.”If I had been able to go into an app sitting in his office and look through my prescription history, I would have known that, yeah, we tried that a couple years back and it didn’t work well,” he says.A feature like that will soon be available for some patients with iPhones.In the upcoming release of Apple’s iOS operating system for iPhones this spring, the Health app will include health records, so patients can take information about their immunizations, medications, lab results and more with them.The feature will first be available to patients of medical providers who partnered with Apple, including Johns Hopkins Medicine; OhioHealth; Ochsner Health System in Jefferson Parish, La.; and Cedars-Sinai in Los Angeles. It won’t cost those patients anything to use this feature, assuming they’re already iPhone users.Apple’s announcement says more medical facilities will offer this feature in the coming months.Some doctors hail it as a big shift away from patients having to handle a big pile of paper records every time they see a new doctor. But Google offered a similar service before and it failed. The search giant shut it down in 2012.Can Apple succeed where Google didn’t?Dr. Jonathan Slotkin says yes; he is a medical director handling digital patient engagement at Geisinger Health System in Pennsylvania, one of Apple’s partners. Unlike even a few years ago, a lot more people now use smartphones and the phones are more secure. There’s now also a technical standard for transferring electronic medical records.”Even if I get care at three different places and maybe they use three different electronic systems, now in one place that I possess in an encrypted way, I have all of that information at my fingertips,” he says.He adds this will make transferring information easier for patients who have to move, or go to a specialist.The health records feature could also change doctors’ habits in some ways, says Dr. Isaac Kohane, chair of the department of biomedical informatics at Harvard Medical School and a professor of pediatrics.”For some reason, and I say this as a physician, most physicians, if they don’t actually know how a test was done, somehow imagine it was done wrongly, and therefore repeat a test, not only at a cost but at some pain to the patient,” Kohane says. “If you have a reliable authoritative description of the test and its results, that uncertainty goes away and that excuse to repeat tests goes away as well.”Kohane called Apple’s new feature a “tectonic shift” in a commentary for member station WBUR’s CommonHealth.But Apple will have to address one big problem that Google had with Google Health, a similar health records service: It was popular with only a niche audience — tech-savvy patients and their caregivers, and fitness enthusiasts. The product didn’t attract a wide base of users.This time will be different, says Dr. Ida Sim, a co-director of biomedical informatics at the University of California, San Francisco Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute. Why? Because unlike with Google Health, patients no longer have to do the heavy lifting of entering or scanning their own data. Also, the 21st Century Cures Act of 2016 pushed federal agencies and providers to use electronic health records, and now there is a data standard for personal health records, which wasn’t the case in 2011.However, she writes in an email that wider adoption will still be an issue.”We’ll probably see huge numbers of people getting their initial Health Records populated. The issue is, then what?… The value will come from third party apps that use Health Records to provide meaningful value to patients, and until this value is demonstrated, I think Health Records uptake will be large but retention and continued engagement of patients will be challenging.”Alan Yu reports for The Pulse, WHYY’s health and science show. Copyright 2018 WHYY. To see more, visit WHYY.last_img read more

The explosion of deaths related to opioid misuse h

first_imgThe explosion of deaths related to opioid misuse has underscored a pressing need for better ways of treating pain, especially chronic pain.Duquesne University pharmacology associate professor Jelena Janjic thinks she’s on to one. It involves using a patient’s own immune system to deliver non-opioid pain medication to places in the body where there’s pain.Janjic’s idea, which draws from the field of cancer research, is to insert tiny amounts of over-the-counter pain medications into minute carriers called nanoparticles, and then inject these into pain patients. The medicines would then travel through the body to places where there is inflammation, and relieve the pain.Janjic has a special reason for wanting to develop new medicines for chronic pain: She suffers from it herself.”As a patient, I want an answer,” she says. “I want to figure out this.”There’s no question that the need for better, non-addictive medications is real and urgent. Researchers have come up with some ideas, but so far none has made it to market. Finding new treatments is difficult for any disease and it’s proving especially difficult for chronic pain because the underlying causes are poorly understood.Attempting to modulate inflammation as way to treat pain “is an active area of research,” says Michael L. Oshinsky, Program Director, Pain and Migraine, at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.Oshinsky says Janjic’s idea of targeting the immune system with nanoparticles carrying pain relievers makes sense, although he cautions that the relationship between inflammation and pain is not well understood.Janjic’s path to this research began in 2010. She has a doctorate in medicinal chemistry, and she had recently moved to Duquesne University where she had set up a lab focused on using nanomedicine techniques to treat cancer.What seemed like out of nowhere, of the blue, she started to suffer bouts of severe pain.”The one that hit me real hard was the whole body, from head to toe,” she says. “I’ve had on and off chronic pain since I was a teenager, but this was different.”In August that year, just before her students arrived back to school, she ended up in the emergency room with pain that was almost intolerable.The doctors’ diagnosis was discouraging. They told her she had a chronic pain syndrome. They said there wasn’t much they could do about it, and they said it was for life.The medicines they gave her helped with the pain somewhat, but left her feeling like she was living in a fog. She was having trouble remembering things, trouble taking notes.”Things were weird. So I decided I am going to do research on myself,” Janjic says.To control her own pain, she turned to mindfulness meditation and other non-medical interventions, including composing music and playing the piano. It’s not as if the pain magically went away, she says, but she was able to carry on with her life. Some days were worse than others.But she also wanted to find a medical solution.She made one important treatment decision early on: She didn’t want to take opioids for her pain.”At the time I could have got them very easily,” Janjic says. “I said, ‘What are you going to give me when I’m 67, or 87, if I take them now?’ I knew they don’t work long-term very well. So almost the refusal of opioids precipitated everything else that happened.”Looking for alternatives to opioids, she dove into the scientific literature, to learn all she could about chronic pain.Chronic pain syndromes are not well understood. With acute pain, it’s usually possible to identify the cause—an injury of some sort, or inflammation caused by an infection. Chronic pain may be linked to an initial mishap, but may persist long after the initial cause of the pain has disappeared. Sometimes there’s no good explanation of the pain at all, a frustrating circumstance for both doctor and patients.In addition to her research, Janjic started paying close attention to her own condition.”I started to understand that my body was actually inflamed,” she says.Inflammation occurs when our bodies’ immune system tries to deal with some damage, maybe from an invading virus or bacteria, and sends a barrage of immune cells to the affected area. On the one hand this is a good thing, since the cells fight the infection. But on the other, it can stimulate nerve cells in a particular part of the body, causing pain.Janjic also noticed something important about her pain: it varied both in intensity and in location. Sometimes it was in her knees, sometimes in her shoulders.She says none of the medicines available today responded to pain’s “diversity within the body.””I [started] to understand the fluctuation,” she says.She realized that the fluctuation meant more immune cells were going to the part of the body where the pain was. She figured if she could get pain medicine into immune cells, that medicine would ride with those cells to where it was needed.Before she got into pain research, Janjic was working on something called cancer nanomedicine. Cancer nanomedicines work by putting anti-cancer drugs into tiny containers called nanoparticles, and then injecting them into cancer patients, where they enter the patients’ immune cells.”So what did I already know how to do? Mess with the immune system with nanomedicines,” Janjic says. “And that’s how the idea of pain nanomedicine was born.”After many years of tinkering, she’s started to get positive results. In a recently published study, she showed that when researchers put a nonsteroidal, anti-inflammatory drug into a nanoparticle, and then injected that into a rat, it reduced the rat’s pain.Janjic says her approach doesn’t try to disable the immune cells.”You still want them to fight infection, you still want them to do what they’re supposed to do,” she says. “But we almost try to stop them from going into override and causing chronic pain.”Janjic, who is also the founder and co-director of the Chronic Pain Research Consortium at Duquesne University, is collaborating with several labs to try pairing different pain medications with different kinds of nano-particles to see what works best. So far progress is slow. And if one of the candidates shows real promise it will be years before anything can be tested in human patients and ultimately approved by the FDA.Janjic credits her own experience with pain for helping her gain a better understanding of pain and how to treat it. She thinks researchers would learn a lot from routinely talking to the people they’re trying to help.”My take home message is, ‘Ask the patient first,’ ” Janjic says. “Ask the kid who’s ten. Ask the grandpa with rheumatoid arthritis what that feels like. This is what I really want to see flourish. Maybe this already happening somewhere. If it is, I want to know. If you are inspiring your research this way, then I want to talk to you.” Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.last_img read more

Tesla Announces Huge Supercharger Expansion

first_imgTesla Tesla Announces Huge Supercharger Expansion Next Article Apply Now » Image credit: Tesla via PC Mag April 25, 2017 2 min read This story originally appeared on PCMag –sharescenter_img The only list that measures privately-held company performance across multiple dimensions—not just revenue. Matthew Humphries Add to Queue Senior Editor By the end of 2017, the number of Superchargers worldwide will have doubled, North America will have 150 percent more. 2019 Entrepreneur 360 List Tesla announced the Model 3 at the beginning of April last year. As an electric vehicle carrying the Tesla name and having a price tag starting at $35,000, it was sure to be extremely popular. One week after pre-orders opened, more than 325,000 reservations were placed, translating to roughly $14 billion of future sales revenue.That’s a lot of new electric cars, and Tesla realizes they’ll all need charging regularly. So ahead of the launch of the Model 3, it’s been announced that the Superchargers network is set to expand. Currently there are 5,431 Superchargers across Tesla’s global network of 842 Supercharger Stations. By the end of 2017 the goal is to get that total past 10,000. In a blog post titled, “Charging Is Our Priority,” Tesla explains that charging needs to be “convenient, abundant and reliable for all owners.” And so an aggressive expansion of the Supercharger network is necessary.As well as the Supercharger expansion, Destination Charging is also set to grow. These are the charging connections offered at public locations including hotels, restaurants and resorts. Currently there are around 9,000 Destination Charging connectors, but Tesla wants to reach 15,000 this year.In order to achieve this expansion, Tesla’s busiest Supercharging Stations are set to expand to allow “several dozen Teslas” to charge simultaneously. New Supercharging Stations will also be built, and purposefully located further away from highways so as to expand the network and support more owners in less busy areas. In North America alone, the expansion will increase the available Superchargers by 150 percent.Full details of existing Supercharger locations as well as planned expansion locations can be viewed on Tesla’s Supercharger global map.last_img read more

The Evidence Says Legal Marijuana Reduces Opioid Deaths But Chris Christie Wont

first_img He may soon be out as governor of New Jersey, but Chris Christie continues to have an impact on one of his favorite topics: the legalization of marijuana.He’s not for it. He made that clear once again this month. As chairman of a committee appointed by President Donald Trump to make recommendations on dealing with the nation’s opioid crisis, Christie took the opportunity to again attack cannabis legalization.In a letter submitted with a report from the Trump-appointed Commission on Combating Drug Addiction and the Opioid Crisis, Christie compared legalization of marijuana to the expanded use of opioids in the 1990s and early 2000s.“The Commission urges that the same mistake is not made with the uninformed rush to put another drug legally on the market in the midst of an overdose epidemic,” he wrote.Related: Entrepreneurs See Opportunity Addressing Consumer Demand for Pesticide-Free CannabisTrump commissionOn Oct. 26, Trump declared the opioid crisis a national public health emergency. The numbers are indeed staggering. According to the commission, 175 people die every day in the United States from drug overdose. “If a terrorist organization was killing 175 Americans a day on American soil, what would we do to stop them?” Christie wrote. “We would do anything and everything.”The commission made a number of recommendations. They include:A national multimedia campaign teaching children about the dangers of drugs and potential for addictionPlacing more nurses and counselors in elementary, middle and high schools to help at-risk studentsBlock grant federal funding for states to pay for anti-opioid programsProviding incentives for drug companies to develop non-opioid pain management drugsWhile marijuana has emerged as a possible alternative to opioids for pain management, the commission does not recommend its use. In his letter, Christie cited the National Institute on Drug Abuse research that found “marijuana use led to a 2 ½ times greater chance that the marijuana user would become an opioid user and abuser.“The commission found this very disturbing.”Others, however, have found the commission’s attack on marijuana itself disturbing.Related: New Jersey Voters Likely Just Approved Legalized MarijuanaDueling statisticsDr. Chinazo Cunningham, a professor of medicine at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, told CNN that “I was surprised to see negative language about marijuana in the opioid report.”Cunningham also said that actual research does not back up the claim in the report that marijuana use increases the chances of opioid addiction. Cunningham’s own research has found that in states where marijuana is legal, opioid overdose deaths fell by 25 percent.Cunningham noted that the continued illegality of marijuana under federal law has kept doctors and scientists from doing thorough research on the potential medical uses for marijuana.Sanjay Gupta, the chief medical correspondent for CNN, also said there is little evidence marijuana leads to abuse of harder drugs. However, alcohol and nicotine have proved to be indicators of future drug abuse, he said.To stay up to date on the latest marijuana related news make sure to like dispensaries.com on Facebook Easy Search. Quality Finds. Your partner and digital portal for the cannabis community. Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. –shares dispensaries.com 3 min read Christie, chairman of a presidential commission on the opioid addiction epidemic, links marijuana to overdose deaths despite all the evidence to the contrary and none in support. Guest Writer The Evidence Says Legal Marijuana Reduces Opioid Deaths But Chris Christie Won’t Believe It Add to Queue Image credit: Win McNamee | Getty Images Download Our Free Android App Next Article Free Green Entrepreneur App Cannabis Keep up with the latest trends and news in the cannabis industry with our free articles and videos, plus subscribe to the digital edition of Green Entrepreneur magazine. November 21, 2017last_img read more