Kasilof River EarlyRun King Salmon Restricted To Hatchery Kings

first_imgHatchery king salmon are recognizable by the healed adipose fin-clip scar. Naturally-produced king salmon may not be possessed or retained and are distinguishable by an intact adipose fin, a small fleshy fin on the back of the fish just ahead of the tail. Naturally-produced king salmon that are caught may not be removed from the water and must be released immediately. In addition, the use of bait is prohibited and only one unbaited, single-hook artificial lure may be used in the Kasilof River from its mouth upstream to the Sterling Highway Bridge. Single-hook means a fishhook with only one point. This restriction is effective from 12:01 a.m. Wednesday, May 1 through 11:59 p.m. Sunday, June 30. The bag and possession limit for king salmon 20 inches or greater in length is one hatchery fish. Facebook0TwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享The Alaska Department of Fish and Game (ADF&G) announced on Wednesday the sport fishing regulation restriction for king salmon in the Kasilof River restricted to hatchery kings only. Area Management Biologist Colton Lipka” “To ensure a successful naturally-produced king salmon broodstock season in 2019, ADF&G has determined restrictions to the early-run king salmon sport fishery in the Kasilof River will provide the best chance to achieve these goals. Its important to our staff and anglers that we continue our efforts to protect and rebuild our wild king salmon stocks. ADF&G does anticipate an increase in angler effort on the Kasilof River due to early-run king salmon restrictions on the Kenai River and we have to manage accordingly with restrictions only allowing hatchery king salmon to be retained on the Kasilof River.”last_img read more

OBITUARY Alan P Ware 72

first_imgShare this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedOBITUARY: Raymond E. Piretti, Jr., 81In “Obituaries”OBITUARY: James Thayer Hastings, 84In “Obituaries”OBITUARY: William J. “Bill” Wolfe, 75In “Obituaries” WILMINGTON, MA — Alan P. Ware, 72, of Wilmington, passed away peacefully at Winchester Hospital on June 21st, after a long illness. He was the beloved husband of the late Linda (Dearstyne) Ware with whom he shared almost 50 years of marriage. He was the son of the late Robert H. and Doris E. Ware.Family and friendships were the center of Alan’s world. He and Linda raised three sons and were blessed with 9 grandchildren. Nothing meant more than to them than having all of the family together. Each Halloween, Alan would beam with pride as he hauled hundreds of pounds of pumpkins home for the annual family pumpkin carving event.Alan was the owner of Battery Shop of New England in Dracut. After creating a battery department at Brodie in the early seventies, where he began his career, he worked throughout the industry, persevered and went on to become the proud owner of Battery Shop of New England. BSNE today remains one of the most successful industrial battery and charger suppliers in the industry, a true testament to Alan’s reputation as a man to be trusted and respected.He was an avid golfer who would often times play 9 holes before heading to his office in the morning. He would then end his day by playing another 18 holes with his evening golf league. In his earlier years, he enjoyed fishing. Two of his favorite trips that he talked about were his ten day canoe and fishing trip on the Allagash Waterway and his late night, hi-tide striper fishing off of Plum Island, followed by a 3 am breakfast with the locals.After the loss of his beloved Linda, the love of his life, Alan continued on despite his own health issues. He remained the great father, grandfather, brother and friend he had always been and made sure his relationships remained strong and unbroken. Despite his faltering health he anxiously awaited Wednesday nights when he would have dinner with his old friends he proudly dubbed “the Romeos” (retired old men eating out.) Each week’s dinner was at a different restaurant but it was his day out with his friends .Alan is survived by his three sons, Mark and his wife Amy of SC, James (Jimmy) of Wilmington and Paul and his wife Katie of Wilmington as well as his brother Bob and his wife Joanne, his brother in law Eric Dearstyne and his wife Joan. He was predeceased by his brother Eric (Wally), survived by his wife Terry of Plum Island. He also leaves his dear friends, Paul Herman of Lynn and Bill Endicott of Eliot, ME.He will be especially missed by his nine grandchildren, Nantahala, Tully, Miles, John, Mackenzie, Michael, Alyssa, Madison and Tyler.Family and friends are invited to gather for visiting hours on Monday, July 1st, from 4:00–8:00 pm in the Nichols Funeral Home, 187 Middlesex Ave., (Rte 62) Wilmington. Alan’s funeral service will be held at the Wilmington United Methodist Church, 87 Church St. (Rte. 62) Wilmington on Tuesday, July 2nd, at 1:00 p.m.In lieu of flowers donations made to be made in Alan’s memory to the Merrimack Valley Food Bank, 735 Broadway St., Lowell, MA 01854. Alan proudly served in the US Navy.Alan P. Ware(NOTE: The above obituary is from Nichols Funeral Home.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.last_img read more

Sad news for some Redmi users as Xiaomi ends support What it

first_imgOne of the biggest strengths of Xiaomi is its continued support for ageing smartphones. The company has updated phones dating back five years old with the latest MIUI software. But it looks like Xiaomi has made a decision that won’t make many users happy.Owners of some older Redmi smartphones won’t be receiving future MIUI updates or any Global Beta, which puts an end to the software support once and for all. The announcement was made on the Mi Community forum, affecting users all across the globe including India.The affected Redmi models that won’t be receiving any future software updates from Xiaomi are:Xiaomi Redmi Note 4Xiaomi Redmi 3SXiaomi Redmi 3XXiaomi Redmi 4Xiaomi Redmi 4AXiaomi Redmi Note 3Xiaomi Redmi Pro Is Redmi Note 7 the new-age Nokia 3310? Closecenter_img Xiaomi Redmi Note 4 won’t receive future software updatesXiaomiIt’s worth noting that the Mi Community Admin who made the announcement on Indian board said the normal upgrade for other devices won’t be affected for the time being. This hints that Xiaomi might end support for other ageing Redmi phones soon, but for now, it has limited end of support towards the aforementioned seven models.What this also means is that all variants of Redmi Note 4 and other Redmi phones in the list won’t get rid of the ads in the interface. Xiaomi is said to eliminate them in MIUI 11 and the latest announcement doesn’t favour the seven Redmi phones the company launched years ago. Xiaomi Redmi 4 also won’t receive future MIUI updatesMi websiteOn the bright side, Redmi phones mentioned in the list will continue to receive normal security updates. But don’t hold on to these phones for long as the company might decide to end that support as well. The best way to stay up-to-date with the latest MIUI software is to upgrade to a newer phone and there are plenty of options from Redmi, such as Redmi Note 7-series and the upcoming Redmi 7.As for those who do not worry too much about the software updates or security updates, the phones won’t stop working. Users will still be able to use all the existing features in the phones even after the software support has been terminated.last_img read more

PEC Ebtedayee exams to begin 18 Nov

first_imgProthom Alo file PhotoThe primary education completion examinations will begin on 18 November, according to an official of the primary and mass education ministry. The official said the examinations will start at 10:30am instead of 11:00am, with duration of two and half hours.This decision was taken at a meeting of the steering committee on exams at the secretariat on Wednesday with primary and mass education minister Mostafizur Rahman in the chair.The official said the exam papers will be evaluated in the respective upazilas. Earlier these were evaluated in different upazilas.In special cases, a candidate will be given an additional 30 minutes instead of 20 minutes. The exams will end on 26 November.last_img read more

16 December observed in Japan

first_imgThe 48th Victory Day of Bangladesh observes in Tokyo, Japan on Sunday, 16 December 2018. Photo: UNBThe 48th glorious Victory Day of Bangladesh was observed in Tokyo, Japan on Sunday with due respect and festivity.Different activities were organised by the Embassy of Bangladesh in Japan, said a press release.The day’s program began with hoisting of the National Flag with the National Anthem at the Embassy premises in the morning.Ambassador Rabab Fatima hoisted the flag while all the officials and representatives of Bangladesh community were present. Later one-minute silence of respect followed by special prayer (dua) was offered in the memory of the martyrs who dedicated their lives in the historic war of independence of Bangladesh in 1971.During delivering her massage, the ambassador solemnly recalled and paid tribute to the Father of the Nation Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman and his family members who died on 15 August 1975.A colorful cultural program including patriotic songs, Rabindra sangeet and recitation of poem was staged. The program ended with singing the national anthem by all.Later Bangladeshi foods were offered to the guests.last_img read more

Md Medic Convicted for Oxycodone Distribution

first_imgA federal jury handed down a guilty verdict in the indictment of Kensington, Maryland physician William Crittenden III. Crittenden faced charges including the unlawful distribution of oxycodone and alprazolam, and eight separate counts of unlawfully distributing oxycodone.Federal law makes it illegal for licensed health care professionals, such as doctors or pharmacists, to knowingly sell or give prescription drugs to someone who does not have either a valid need or valid prescription for the drugs.  According to court documents, Crittenden served as a medical director at Healthy Life, reportedly writing prescriptions for narcotics to customers without a legitimate medical need.Crittenden was paid $1,500 a day by the managers of Healthy Life – more than $104,500 over the course of just a few months. He was convicted of knowingly providing prescriptions to oxycodone-addicted individuals, as well as low-level dealers.“William Crittenden prescribed opioid drugs to people who had no medical need for the drugs.  Pharmaceutical pills can be just as harmful as illegal drugs when they are used without proper oversight,” United States Attorney for the District of Maryland Rod J. Rosenstein said in a news release. He announced the guilty verdict on Feb. 22.According to Deborah C. England, a San Francisco-based litigator who writes extensively about the illegal opiate trade, the easy access through which oxycodone is secured magnifies its popularity.  Nicknamed “hillbilly heroin,” the synthetic opiate has ushered in an entire industry of bogus “pain management clinics,” similar to Healthy Life that facilitate the pill mill.In an interview with the AFRO, Rosenstein described a culture of growing addiction, facilitated by physicians who operate in the same character as traditional pushers. “Drug addiction is fueled by doctors and pain clinics that prescribe drugs for people without a legitimate medical need,” said Rosenstein. “Some patients become addicted, and others sell the drugs on the streets. Doctors who irresponsibly write opioid prescriptions are acting like street-corner drug pushers.”According to evidence presented during Crittenden’s 11-day trial, Healthy Life managed two Maryland locations – in Owings Mills and Timonium – and both attracted “large and unruly crowds that reportedly caused disturbances outside the locations, used narcotics inside the clinic, and engaged in narcotics transactions in the parking lot.”Misuse and abuse of prescription drugs has gained increasing attention in recent years, with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reporting in 2013 nearly 16,000 American deaths resulting from accidental prescription painkiller overdoses. “The question for a lot of people is whether or not a licensed professional should be handled in the same manner as a street dealer and the answer is either a resounding ‘yes,’ or a call for them to given even stiffer penalties,” retired law professor Mariah Early told the AFRO.  “There is a code of conduct, ethics and standards that set professional members of society apart from others. When doctors who have taken the Hippocratic Oath to do no harm, systematically endanger their clients, they have betrayed a sacred trust and are worse than dealers on the street.”Crittenden faces a maximum sentence of 20 years in prison. A date for sentencing has not been announced.last_img read more

Group suggests adding tag to resurrected extinct animal names

first_img As technology improves, scientists often find themselves faced with addressing overlooked classification issues—scientific naming is no exception. As researchers develop new methods of bringing back extinct species or improving old techniques, the resultant organisms are very nearly copies of their extinct ancestors. Currently, there are three main resurrection methods. The first is back breeding, in which a species is bred over time to resemble a bygone species. Another is cloning, in which ancient reproductive material is placed in the uterus of a living close relative. Finally, there is genomic engineering, in which information that is missing from samples of a target species is filled in using DNA from a close modern relative. None of the techniques result in creation of a creature that is an exact copy of the original species, and that is at least partly why the authors suggest adding a tag to their names.The authors give examples of how the new tag could be used, changing Mammuthus columbi to Mammuthus recr. columbi, for example. In some cases, if the new species is not a close copy of the original, the group suggests that a new species name be given, such as Mammuthus recr. Americanus.The idea of changing the name of resurrected species is not new. The International Union for Conservation of Nature published guidelines three years ago offering possible ways to classify resurrected species. The authors with the new effort suggest a more standardized format. They suggest that not only will it make things less confusing for scientists, it will help environmentalists develop specific guidelines for preventing the species from going extinct again.If the international community agrees with the suggestion and governing bodies move forward with the idea, there are still likely to be some issues that will be difficult to resolve. For instance, researchers want to determine how much extinct DNA in a living animal’s genome qualifies for tagging. Also, some may not agree with the tag chosen because, as some in the field have already pointed out, current resurrections are not actually copies of ancient species—they are hybrids. Citation: Group suggests adding tag to resurrected extinct animal names (2017, June 9) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2017-06-group-adding-tag-resurrected-extinct.html (Phys.org)—A group of scientists from several institutions in Germany has suggested that extinct animals that are resurrected through scientific means be given a tag on their name to indicate their origins. In a Policy Forum piece in the journal Science, the group suggests adding the tag “recr” to scientific names given to resurrected creatures to make sure they are not confused with the original. More information: De-extinction, nomenclature, and the law Science  09 Jun 2017: Vol. 356, Issue 6342, pp. 1016-1017 DOI: 10.1126/science.aal4012 , http://science.sciencemag.org/content/356/6342/1016SummaryThe concept of de-extinction, aimed at restoration of extinct species, is controversial (1). Improvements in de-extinction techniques (back-breeding, cloning, and genomic engineering) now provide the opportunity to attempt to resurrect extinct species (2, 3). Up to 25 extinct animal species have been proposed as candidates for de-extinction (4) on the basis of their high public profiles, availability of well-preserved DNA, existence of closely related species who may serve as host or surrogate parents, and availability of suitable habitat in the case of planned reintroductions (1). From a legal point of view, it will be crucial to clarify how de-extinct species will be classified, in particular, in relation to their potential conservation status under national and international law. We discuss implications for conservation laws, which largely depend on nomenclature, and laws regarding the release of genetically engineered species, which do not, and argue for unique naming of de-extinct species. Journal information: Science A mammoth task—how do we decide which species to resurrect?center_img Explore further © 2017 Phys.org The Columbian mammoth (Mammuthus columbi). Credit: Wikipedia. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more