Study shows cardiovascular problems are more common in uterine cancer survivors

first_img Source:https://academic.oup.com/ May 8 2018A new study in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute indicates that survivors of uterine cancer are more likely to experience cardiovascular problems years after treatment.Endometrial (uterine) cancer is the fourth most commonly diagnosed cancer among women in the United States. Incidence rates among women under the age of 50 have been increasing by 1.3% per year since 1988 and by 1.9% among women over the age of 50 since 2005. It was the 6th most common cause of death from cancer among women in the United States in 2017, with an estimated 10,920 deaths. As of 2017, there were an estimated 757,200 endometrial cancer survivors in the United States.Previous studies of long-term health effects among endometrial cancer survivors have focused largely on quality of life, mental health, obesity, and adverse sexual side effects. But the high overall survival rate among people diagnosed with the cancer, the projected increase in the number of such cancer diagnoses, the introduction of more complex therapies, and the high mortality due to cardiovascular disease among endometrial cancer survivors, suggest that other long-term health effects are important to assess.Researchers here identified 3,621 endometrial cancer survivors using the Utah Population Database. Diagnosis data was available for women aged 18 and over diagnosed with this cancer between 1997 and 2012 in Utah.The results of the study indicate that approximately 25.7% of cancer survivors were diagnosed with heart diseases five to ten years after cancer diagnosis. Endometrial cancer survivors were 47% more likely to be diagnosed with a disease of the heart between one of five years after cancer diagnosis and 33% more likely to be diagnosed with a disease of the heart between five to ten years after the initial cancer diagnosis.Related StoriesSugary drinks linked to cancer finds studyNew protein target for deadly ovarian cancerResearchers identify potential drug target for multiple cancer typesResearchers observed elevated risk during the one-to-five-year time period for peripheral and vascular atherosclerosis, hypotension, phlebitis, thrombophlebitis, thromboembolism, other circulatory diseases, and other diseases of the veins and lymphatics. Researchers found associations for hypotension, diseases of veins and lymphatics, and other diseases of veins and lymphatics.Between one to five years after diagnosis, researchers observed increased cardiovascular risks among endometrial cancer survivors for phlebitis, thrombophlebitis and thromboembolism, lymphatic diseases, pulmonary heart disease, and atrial fibrillation. Some elevated risk persisted for cardiovascular diseases at five to ten years. Compared to patients who had surgery, patients who additionally had radiation therapy and/or chemotherapy were at increased risk for heart and circulatory system disorders between one to five years after cancer diagnosis.Prior studies have reported similar proportions of endometrial cancer survivors who have hypertension diagnoses, but this study is the first to quantify risk for hypertension after cancer diagnosis among uterine cancer survivors compared to the general population.This study suggests that increased monitoring for cardiovascular diseases may be important for endometrial cancer patients for 10 years after cancer diagnosis.last_img read more

Study finds fewer than 5 of lowincome urban mothers use prenatal vitamins

first_imgMay 24 2018A study of more than 7,000 low-income, urban mothers enrolled in the Boston Birth Cohort found that fewer than 5 percent of them started folic acid supplementation and used it almost daily before pregnancy, a widely recommended public health measure designed to prevent potentially crippling birth defects.A report of the findings was published on April 19 in the American Journal of Public Health.”The findings are concerning because they show that public health interventions aren’t always effective in reaching vulnerable populations who need them the most,” says Tina Cheng, M.D., M.P.H., co-director of Johns Hopkins Children’s Center and the study’s lead author.Numerous studies have shown that prepregnancy use of prenatal vitamins containing folic acid can prevent 50 to 70 percent of neural tube defects. Since 1992, the United States Public Health Service has recommended all women of reproductive age take folic acid supplementation.Development of the neural tube is completed about 28 days postconception, Cheng notes, often before a woman’s aware she is pregnant, and because nearly half of all U.S. pregnancies are unintended, it’s important for all women of reproductive age to routinely take folic acid supplementation. Prenatal vitamin supplements sold over the counter cost about 30 cents a day.To better understand the pattern of prenatal vitamin supplementation and the blood levels of folate (a biomarker of circulating folate nutrition status) in U.S. high-risk populations, Cheng and her colleagues focused on a group of 8,494 mother-infant pairs recruited into the Boston Birth Cohort between 1998 and June 2014 at the Boston Medical Center.For the purposes of their analysis, the researchers looked only at data for women with single, live births without major birth defects, which narrowed the study population to 7,612 mothers. The study included 3,829 black and 2,203 Hispanic mothers. Of these, 2,633 (34.6 percent) were married; 2,692 (35.4 percent) had a college education; 870 (11.4 percent) smoked; 643 (8.5 percent) reported using alcohol; and 3,845 (50.5 percent) said their pregnancy was planned.All women had reported their use of folic acid supplementation during preconception and each trimester of pregnancy through a questionnaire interview one to three days after giving birth.The research team found that of the 7,612 mothers, 325 (4.3 percent) took folic acid supplementation almost daily preconception; 4,257 (55.9 percent) took it almost daily during the first trimester; 4,520 (59.4 percent) took it almost daily during the second trimester; and 4,416 (58 percent) took it nearly daily during the third trimester.Related StoriesMaternal prepregnancy surgery linked to increased risk of opioid withdrawal in newbornsNew research examines whether effects of alcohol/pregnancy policies vary by raceCannabis use during pregnancy may cause premature birthOverall, 6,592 (86.6 percent) mothers took no prenatal vitamins preconception at all.Of those study women, 2,598 had maternal plasma folate concentrations available for analysis. Black and Hispanic mothers had lower plasma folate concentrations (averages of 28.2 nanomoles per liter and 30.4 nanomoles per liter, respectively) than white mothers, who had an average of 34.2 nanomoles per liter. Black and Hispanic mothers also had higher rates of folate insufficiency (defined as plasma folate concentration less than 13.5 nanomoles per liter based on World Health Organization criteria), at 12.2 percent and 8.1 percent, respectively, than white mothers, who had a 5.1 percent rate of insufficiency. Previous studies suggest babies are most at risk for neural tube defects if their mothers had insufficient folate intake.The research team also saw a wide range of maternal plasma folate concentrations; at high end, 595 or 22.9 percent, had elevated concentrations (defined as plasma folate concentration greater than 45.3 nanomoles per liter based on WHO criteria). This suggests that folic acid supplementation is only one factor affecting plasma folate. To ensure optimal folate levels, health care professionals need to obtain a good history of maternal vitamin supplementation and diet and consider blood folate levels as indicated, explains Cheng.Cheng and her team acknowledge that their study is limited by its use of one dataset in one city, and caution is needed to generalize to populations with different characteristics. They also note that self-reported vitamin supplementation may be inaccurate. Lastly, while the blood folate level is an objective measure, this study only measured at one time point, which at best reflects the folate concentrations during the third trimester.But Cheng pointed out that the findings are an important step forward toward understanding folate supplementation and levels in vulnerable populations, as well as informing strategies going forward to reduce health disparities. For example, there is growing knowledge on the importance of maintaining optimal folate nutrition for maternal and fetal health, as well as long-term health of the child. Health professionals should make sure that all women of childbearing age and pregnant mothers are adequately advised and monitored with regard to folate intake, with the goal of maximizing its health benefits and minimizing adverse effects associated with excessive folate levels. Source:https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/news/media/releases/vast_majority_of_poor_urban_women_dont_use_prenatal_vitamins_before_pregnancy_study_showslast_img read more

Researchers examine use of Twitter to propagate or debunk conspiracy theories during

first_img Source:https://home.liebertpub.com/news/a-new-study-examines-use-of-twitter-to-spread-or-debunk-conspiracy-theories-during-recent-zika-virus-outbreak/2421 Reviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Sep 11 2018Researchers investigating the use of Twitter to propagate or debunk conspiracy theories related to the 2015-2016 Zika virus outbreak analyzed the content of more than 25,000 Tweets and the characteristics of the social networks used to disseminate them. The analysis showed that Tweets intended to propagate conspiracy theories were spread through a more decentralized network than debunking messages. The findings are reported in an article published in Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers.Related StoriesResearchers succeed in conquering chronic infection with hepatitis B virusNew class of molecules could someday become basis for Zika-specific therapeuticResearch sheds light on how hepatitis B virus establishes chronic infectionIn the article entitled “Propagating and Debunking Conspiracy Theories on Twitter During the 2015-2016 Zika Virus Outbreak,” author Michael J. Wood, PhD, University of Winchester, U.K. concluded that, in comparison with debunking messages, using Twitter to propagate conspiracy theories was more likely to involve the use of rhetorical questions and a greater number of claims with explicit references to authorities. In this way, the study established that conspiracy theories can be considered a form of rumor and can be analyzed based on rumor theory.”Though conspiracy theories are nothing new, the advent of social media has created a conduit for more rapid spread of these rumors,” says Editor-in-Chief Brenda K. Wiederhold, PhD, MBA, BCB, BCN, Interactive Media Institute, San Diego, California and Virtual Reality Medical Institute, Brussels, Belgium. “Public health agencies can help alleviate anxiety and fear in the population by using these same channels to provide more accurate and reassuring messages.”last_img read more

Study shows how the drive to eat overpowers the brains signal to

first_imgBy Sally Robertson, B.Sc.Sep 21 2018University of Michigan researchers have studied two groups of brain cells that compete for the control of feeding behaviour and found that cells that drive the urge to eat overpower the ones that signal to stop. Source:https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2018-09/mm-u-fbs092018.php Lightspring | ShutterstockThe study also showed that the brain’s opioid system is involved and that administering a drug called naloxone can block this system.They say their findings could help to inform the fight against the global obesity epidemic.In a mouse model, Huda Akil and colleagues studied two groups of brain cells called pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) and AgRP (Agouti-Gene-Related Peptide). The two groups are located near to each other within a region of the brain called the arcuate nucleus, which is part of the behavior-regulating hypothalamus.Previous studies have demonstrated that POMC responds to certain signals in the body by restricting the urge to eat, while AgRP drives the urge to eat, particularly when food is scarce or when a long time has passed since last eating.As reported in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, the current study has now shown how the two groups of cells relate to each other. Using a technique called optogenetics, Akil and team stimulated POMC, given that POMC neurons had previously been shown to play a role in feeding behaviour.However, the result of stimulating the POMC cells was that a group of neighboring AgRP cells were also stimulated. These two groups of cells are derived from the same parent cells during embryonic development, meaning that the technique the researchers used to target POMS also captured the AgRP nerve cells.Related StoriesRush University Medical Center offers new FDA-approved treatment for brain aneurysmsRepurposing a heart drug could increase survival rate of children with ependymomaWearing a hearing aid may mitigate dementia riskInterestingly, the team found that when both groups of cells were activated, it was the “keep eating” signal from AgRP that had the most influence on eating behavior. That AgRP signal was more powerful than the “stop eating” signal generated by POMC.”When both are stimulated at once, AgRP steals the show,” says Akil.The researchers then used a technique called c-fos activation to further investigate the downstream effects of activating POMC and AgRP.They found that activating AGRP also activated the brain’s opioid system and that administering the opioid antagonist drug naloxone stopped the urge to eat.“This suggests that the brain’s own endogenous opioid system may play a role in wanting to eat beyond what is needed,”Akil.The finding led Akil and team to wonder whether bombardment of the senses with the things we see, smell and socially interact with relating to food may be involved with the urge to overeat.She thinks perhaps these factors combine to trigger us to become interested in eating when we are not even hungry: “There’s a whole industry built on enticing you to eat, whether you need it or not, through visual cues, packaging, smells, emotional associations. People get hungry just looking at them, and we need to study the neural signals involved in those attentional, perceptional mechanisms that drive us to eat.”last_img read more

Former German Minister Drops Her Fight to Reclaim PhD

Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Email By tomorrow, however, Schavan will be able to claim another advanced degree: The University of Lübeck, which Schavan helped rescue from recent financial woes, is bestowing on her an honorary doctorate. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) BERLIN—Former German Education and Research Minister Annette Schavan is giving up her fight to keep her Ph.D. title, she announced today on her website. It marks the end of one of the most hotly debated plagiarism cases here in recent years.Schavan was awarded the degree in educational science at the University of Düsseldorf after completing her dissertation in 1980. More than 30 years later, Schavan, by then the nation’s education and research minister, was charged with plagiarism by an anonymous accuser who posted an analysis of the dissertation online. The University of Düsseldorf investigated and in February 2013 revoked the degree. Just 4 days later, Schavan resigned.But the wrangling continued even after her resignation. Although Schavan acknowledged mistakes in her dissertation, she denied any intent to mislead and took her case to court. Last month, the Düsseldorf Administrative Court ruled that the university’s action “was taken in compliance with the law.” Schavan had taken several passages from secondary sources without citing them correctly, the court found. “After being able to think about the judgment … for a few days, I have decided not to appeal and to end the legal fighting,” Schavan wrote in the statement on her home page. “Now I am preparing for new challenges and am looking forward to them.” Schavan, a devout Catholic, has been tapped as Germany’s ambassador to the Vatican. read more

Swiss scientists regain access to some EU grants through 2016

first_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Email Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country BRUSSELS—Starting today, scientists in Switzerland will again be able to apply for some research funds from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 program—including coveted grants from the European Research Council (ERC). Both sides reached a short-term deal undoing restrictions imposed on Swiss scientists after a referendum to curb mass immigration back in February.Scientists were the first to feel the cooling of the relationships between the European Union and the affluent country it surrounds after the referendum. The union expects Switzerland to include Croatia, which entered the union last year, in its agreement on the free movement of persons. But following the vote, Switzerland said it couldn’t sign the Croatian deal. As a result, Switzerland lost its privileged status as an associated country to Horizon 2020, the bloc’s research funding program.After several months of negotiations, the commission has now agreed to give Switzerland its associated country status back for the so-called first pillar of Horizon 2020, worth €24.4 billion for 7 years. This includes individual grants from ERC and the Marie Curie fellowships for science training, staff exchanges and mobility, as well as the Future and Emerging Technologies scheme, which is showering two 10-year projects with up to €1 billion each. (One of them, a controversial plan to model the human brain, is the brainchild of Henry Markram, a researcher at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne.)center_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe But Swiss researchers will still be considered third-country applicants for most of Horizon 2020, including its €29.7 billion third pillar, which funds collaborative research projects to solve “societal challenges.” The deal doesn’t affect restrictions on the education program Erasmus+ either.Researchers in Switzerland heaved a cautious sigh of relief at the news. But Dominique Arlettaz, vice president of the Rectors’ Conference of the Swiss Universities, pointed out that the deal is only partial and temporary. “We don’t know at all what will happen after [2016]. You know that research is done with a long-term vision so it’s difficult not to know what will happen from 2017 on,” Arlettaz told the French-speaking public radio station La 1ère on Saturday.The temporary solution is beneficial for both sides, a commission representative tells ScienceInsider. “We have an interest in having the best participants in the program, and Swiss participants are certainly world-class,” he says. But in the long run, the immigration issue remains a flash point: If it doesn’t ratify the Croatia protocol before 9 February 2017—3 years after the immigration referendum—Switzerland will lose its associated status again. If it does sign the protocol, however, it will regain its associated country status for the whole of Horizon 2020.The agreement will be signed formally in December, but will apply retroactively from today onward. According to an E.U. source, “all member states stand behind this deal, including Croatia.”last_img read more

New film changes colors when you stretch it

first_imgMaterials scientists often look to the natural world for inspiration, but usually it takes their inventions a while to catch up with biological discoveries. Not this time. Earlier this week, scientists in Switzerland revealed that chameleons change colors by expanding a lattice of tiny crystals just under their skin. Now, researchers in California are reporting that they’ve made a thin film that changes colors when they tug on it. Such films could produce color-changing sensors that give engineers a way to monitor potentially dangerous structural changes to everything from bridges to airplane wings.Both studies show how nature and technologists often converge on the same solution to challenges they face, says Richard Prum, an ornithologist at Yale University who specializes in how animals change color. The new thin film “has grand prospects in technology,” Prum says. “It also shows the value of studying organisms.”The colors we typically see in everything from grass and flowers to paints and fabrics occur when white, broad-spectrum light strikes their surfaces. The unique chemical composition of each surface absorbs various bands, or wavelengths, of light. The wavelengths that aren’t absorbed are reflected back, with shorter wavelengths giving objects a blue hue and longer objects appearing redder, and the entire rainbow of possible combinations in between. Changing the color of a surface, such as the leaves on a tree in autumn, requires a change in chemical makeup. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Email Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrycenter_img But that’s not the way chameleons shift their colors. Instead of changing the composition of the light-absorbing pigments in their skin, chameleons change the way materials embedded in the skin reflect light. In this case, the reptiles have a layer of cells called iridophores, which lie just below the skin’s surface. These cells contain tiny spherical crystallites made from guanine, one of the nucleic acid building blocks of DNA. The crystallites are arranged in a regular 3D lattice, like oranges on a fruit stand. This arrangement causes them to strongly reflect one set of wavelengths, making them appear green, for example. But this week in Nature Communications, researchers led by geneticist Michel Milinkovitch from the University of Geneva reported that chameleons rapidly shift colors by changing the salt balance in their iridophores. This causes the cells to swell with water, increasing the distance between guanine crystallites, in turn causing the array to reflect a longer wavelength of light, such as yellow.Today, researchers led by Connie Chang-Hasnain, an electrical engineer at the University of California, Berkeley, report in the journal Optica that they’ve followed a related strategy to produce color changes from green to orange in a thin plastic film. To do so, they etched a 1 cm2 array of beams, each thinner than the wavelength of light, into a thin silicon film. They then embedded the silicon array within a flexible plastic film. And when they flexed, bent, or stretched the film, this changed the space between the beams, producing brilliant color changes. The setup worked so well that it reflected up to 83% of the light that hit it.That efficiency bodes well for potential future applications. One possibility, Prum says, is that such films could lead to a new class of energy-efficient full-color displays for e-readers and other electronic devices. Conventional lighted color displays in devices such as iPads and Kindles are power-hungry, because they use electricity to force elements of the display to emit particular colors of light. However, displays that make use of tiny movements to manipulate colors might not require this continuous electrical input, giving them additional hours between charges. The same color-changing ability could also enable the films to work as novel sensors, revealing structural changes in bridges, buildings, and even the wings of aircraft. That way, a simple shift from green to orange could signal dangerous wear and tear, and possibly even save lives. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwelast_img read more

Researchers react to Chinas twochild policy move

first_img Email Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe The announcement was not unexpected, says Zeng Yi, a demographer at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, and the director of Peking University’s Center for Healthy Aging and Development. In 2013 and again this past April, China’s National Development and Reform Commission, a high-level policy-making body, had included  in a key publication papers Zeng authored that advocated quick adoption of a two-child policy. And in 2013 the government rolled out a new policy that allowed couples to have two children when one parent was an only child. Those moves followed longtime criticism of the one-child policy from international human rights and religious groups, and tensions over its enforcement within China.Many China-born scholars and former officials had been advocating for the policy’s abolition for years. One issue they highlighted was a sex-ratio imbalance: China’s 2010 census found that 118 boys were born for every 100 girls—a gap that stayed nearly steady from 2000, when the census found 117 boys per 100 girls.The researchers also argued that China’s fertility rate had dropped to potentially problematic levels for a nation with a rapidly aging population and shrinking workforce. By comparing official statistics to school registration records and other data, they concluded that China’s birth rate had dropped to 1.5 children per woman in 2010—much lower than the 1.77 figure the government claimed. Analysts say the government presented the higher figure in order to provide a justification for the one-child policy.Other researchers have pursued studies suggesting that many Chinese now prefer small families. An early survey of thousands of women in Jiangsu province, for example, found that relatively few were ready to take advantage of an early policy exception in the province that allowed some couples to have two-child families. One child was best, some 55% of women eligible to have two children told surveyors.Those results reflect the fact that “the costs of childbearing is very high,” Zeng wrote in an email. A preference for fewer children is “widely prevalent in all urban areas and quite many rural areas,” he adds.At this point, Cai says, the factors convincing couples to have children “are more structural and cultural” than policy-driven. Still, he adds, abolishing the policy sends an important message and will help ease tension within Chinese society: “It is a liberating step.”Other researchers have set out to quantify the one-child policy’s more intangible effects on Chinese society. In a paper published in Science in January 2013, Lisa Cameron of Monash University in Melbourne, Australia, and co-authors used games developed by experimental economists to estimate the degree to which the policy has shaped the personalities of what some dub the “little emperor” generation. The researchers found that study participants who became only children because of the policy were less trustworthy and less conscientious than others, even after controlling for factors like gender and education. The policy shift may have a “modest effect in the short term” on the birth rate, says Wang Feng, a demographer at the University of California, Irvine. But its long-term impact on population trends like aging will be “mostly unnoticeable,” he predicts. China’s mortality rate is low, Zeng notes, and a baby boom generation born during the 1950s and 1960s, when Mao Zedong encouraged couples to have many children, will age in the next few decades, keeping China’s overall population relatively old.center_img Researchers aren’t surprised by yesterday’s announcement that China’s government will abandon its longstanding one-child policy. And although demographers predict the new two-baby allowance will have just a modest near-term impact on the nation’s demographics, they say it could bring social and political benefits.China’s government will be “actively taking steps to counter the aging of the population,” the Xinhua state news agency reported Thursday in announcing the move, which followed discussions among Communist Party leaders about China’s forthcoming 5-year development plan. Demographers had long urged the change, pointing to China’s rapidly aging population, along with a surplus of tens of millions of males caused by sex-selective abortion. The announcement is “long overdue,” wrote Yong Cai, a demographer at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, in an email. “This is probably the easiest reform program that the Chinese Communist Party could push out—with virtually no political risk, but with enormous social benefits.” Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)last_img read more

The most dangerous germs in the hospital may be those you bring

first_img Hospitals may look squeaky clean, but microbiologists know better. Staphylococcus aureus sits on the doctor’s pager, Corynebacterium striatum lives on the sink faucet, and Enterococcus faecalis hangs out on the bedrail—all threatening the health of patients. But a new paper suggests that the most dangerous bacteria aren’t the ones you encounter in the hospital, but those you bring in yourself.“People have suspected that hospital-associated infection pathogens might be coming in with patients, but this is the first environmental verification of that,” says Jordan Peccia, an environmental engineer at Yale University who studies disease transmission in buildings and was not involved with the study.Tracking roving microbes is difficult if you don’t know where they came from in the first place. So in the new study, a team led by microbial ecologist Jack Gilbert of the University of Chicago in Illinois embedded itself in a brand new hospital—the university’s Center for Care and Discovery, which opened in 2013. Months before the opening, the researchers talked extensively to the 10-story hospital’s architects, doctors, and nurses to map out where staff and patients would enter and exit, which restrooms and vending machines they would use, and where they might come into contact with other people. “It was remarkable to have access to this kind of environment as it was being built,” Gilbert says. “It took months and months to get administrative approval.” They also swabbed surfaces all over the hospital right before it opened, and found essentially a pristine environment. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) The most dangerous germs in the hospital may be those you bring with you By Michael PriceMay. 24, 2017 , 2:00 PM Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrycenter_img Email A new study suggests many so-called hospital-acquired infections actually arrive with the patient. Javier Larrea/Getty Images That didn’t last long. During the first day of operation, there was a sharp uptick in the numbers of Corynebacterium, Staphylococcus, and Streptococcus on phones, countertops, and computer mice in nurse stations. These bacteria are responsible for infections like diphtheria, Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, and pneumonia—diseases especially dangerous to people with weakened immune systems.For the next 365 days, Gilbert and his colleagues swabbed work surfaces in many rooms, as well as the skin and clothing of doctors, nurses, hospital staff, and patients—a total of 6523 samples. “It was a bit awkward,” Gilbert recalls. “People would have just arrived for treatment, and we’d say, ‘Excuse me, can I swab your armpit, nose and hand?’”The team compared patients’ microbial profile at their arrival and when they were discharged, and applied statistical methods to determine what had influenced their microbial makeup over the course of their stay. Bedrails jumped out as a significant potential reservoir of bacteria; the microbes living on them resembled those found on the patients more than those on any other sampled material did. That suggests bedrails are capable of picking up a person’s bacteria and harboring it until the bed’s next occupant comes along—unless the bed is well sterilized in between.Of the 252 patients who participated in the study, about 20 came down with what experts would define as a hospital-acquired infection, the researchers report today in Science Translational Medicine. That’s close to stats from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which has found that about one in 25 hospitalized patients will get such infections. But room swabs of the patient in the new study, as well as the nurses and doctors they interacted with, failed to turn up the bacteria responsible for their infections, suggesting they don’t appear to have gotten their microbes from the hospital at all, according to the team’s analysis. “The most likely explanation is the patients already had those bacteria when they were admitted,” Gilbert says.That would be a big shift away from current thinking in much of the medical world, which considers hospitals to be harbors of potentially dangerous diseases. Instead, the study suggests hospital rooms’ microbes might not be any more dangerous than those in patients’ own homes. “If it’s true,” says Gilbert, “that’s going to be a paradigm shift in how we think of hospital-acquired infections.”It’s nearly impossible to totally sterilize any room, he says, and most hospitals are already doing a pretty good job keeping things as disease-free as possible. Rather than focusing on ever more potent sterilization efforts, more resources should be spent treating people with probiotics and antibiotics before they enter a hospital when possible, he says.last_img read more

Did tiny algae fell mighty dinosaurs

first_img Did tiny algae fell mighty dinosaurs? By Carolyn GramlingAug. 29, 2017 , 3:57 PM One chunk of this formation “is the most fossiliferous package of rock I’ve ever seen,” says Raymond Rogers, a geologist at Macalester College in St. Paul, who has been studying the site for 2 decades. He and his colleagues have so far cataloged nearly 1200 specimens from a single bed a third the size of a tennis court.Over time, the team grew skeptical of drought as the only explanation. Large and small animals nestle against each other, suggesting that the bodies were buried where they died and that the killer struck all kinds of animals without discrimination. In addition, whatever killed these animals “was fast-acting,” Rogers says, “dropping birds in their tracks.” And it happened again and again, creating multiple layers of bone beds.Last week, at the annual meeting of the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology here, Rogers noted the arched-back posture of the dead, which suggests neck convulsions; an unusual carbonate crust, similar to those left by algae in other sediments; and the sheer number of dead birds. Taken together, he says, these clues suggest that the killer was “almost certainly harmful algal blooms,” which can develop repeatedly in the same place in late summer.HABs have been implicated in mass deaths before. In 1878, a Nature paper noted a peculiar hyperextended neck posture—similar to the postures of the Maevarano creatures—in dead livestock near a lake; testing confirmed that the animals had ingested toxic cyanobacteria. And in a 2014 paper in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B, Pyenson and others suggested that toxic algae periodically killed hundreds of whales and other marine animals off the coast of what is now Chile, starting 11 million years ago.Algae even might be implicated at Germany’s famous Messel Pit, says paleontologist Wighart von Koenigswald of the University of Bonn in Germany, who was not involved in the new study. That series of Eocene mass graves is full of birds and bats, he notes, making one explanation—sudden carbon dioxide degassing from an ancient lake—unlikely. Moreover, the beds include turtles caught in the act of copulation as well as pregnant mares, suggesting that the deaths happened during mating season across different years. years. Toxic algae are “the most plausible explanation,” Von Koenigswald says.In Madagascar and elsewhere the smoking gun—direct evidence of algae—is still missing, Rogers acknowledges. He plans to hunt for chemical traces or biomarkers of algae in the rocks and fossils. If such evidence is found in Madagascar, says Smithsonian vertebrate paleontologist Kay Behrensmeyer, this “very provocative” idea might help explain other fossil troves. “It opens up a possibility that we probably have not been considering seriously enough.” Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Seventy million years ago, they all came to drink in the rapidly drying river: long-necked sauropods, fierce theropods, crocodiles, lizards, and raven-sized birds. They never left. The giant and the tiny were entombed together in the riverbed, forming what is now a spectacular series of mass graves in northwestern Madagascar. Last week, researchers proposed a culprit behind this ancient mystery: harmful algal blooms (HABs), in the very water that had lured the animals.The remains of such algal blooms “should be more common in the fossil record,” says vertebrate paleontologist Nicholas Pyenson of the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C., who was not part of the study. But he cautions that they are tough to prove.Bone beds always come with a mystery: Why did so many animals die at once? Floods and volcanoes are sometimes invoked, and for years researchers suspected that drought killed the animals whose fossils accumulated in the Maevarano Formation of Madagascar. Torrential rains punctuating periods of drought might have created turbulent rivers choked with sediment that buried skeletons intact. Harmful algal blooms may have killed this carnivorous theropod dinosaur, discovered by researchers excavating a series of 70-million-year-old bone beds in northwestern Madagascar.  center_img Andrew Farke Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Email Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwelast_img read more

NASA acting Administrator Robert Lightfoot to retire

first_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country NASA’s acting administrator, Robert Lightfoot, who has led the agency since January 2017, announced today that he will be retiring effective 30 April. The move places pressure on President Donald Trump’s administration and the Senate to secure long-term leadership for the agency.Last September, the White House nominated Representative Jim Bridenstine (R–OK) to lead NASA. Bridenstine’s nomination has been advanced by the committee overseeing the agency, but it has stalled in the Senate because of opposition from Democrats and, especially, two senators from Florida, Bill Nelson (D) and Marco Rubio (R). Both have expressed their preference that a “space professional” lead the agency.Rubio also has personal reasons to oppose the nomination: Bridenstine actively opposed his 2016 presidential bid in campaign ads for Senator Ted Cruz (R–TX). This is the real reason for Rubio’s blockade, according to Senator Jim Inhofe (R–OK), who spoke to The Oklahoman for an article published today. “He doesn’t like Jim Bridenstine,” Inhofe said while recounting a recent conversation he had with Rubio. “I said, ‘What do I have to do or what do we have to do to get you to stand back and let him into this job?’ [Rubio] said, ‘Not a chance. I’m not going to do it.’ Those are his words.” Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe By Paul VoosenMar. 12, 2018 , 2:25 PM Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Email NASA acting Administrator Robert Lightfoot to retire Robert Lighfoot, NASA’s acting administrator, testifies before Congress earlier this year. NASA/Bill Ingalls/Flickr (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0) Rubio’s opposition, and the absence of Senator John McCain (R–AZ), who is undergoing cancer treatment, means the Senate lacks the necessary 50 votes to confirm Bridenstine. Senate Democrats have flatly opposed his nomination, citing remarks he has made in the past expressing skepticism about human contributions to climate change. Lightfoot is already the longest serving acting administrator of the agency. He has steered NASA to focus back on the moon, following the guidance of the administration, including Vice President Mike Pence and Scott Pace, the executive secretary of the reconstituted National Space Council. His retirement comes as a surprise and should force the administration to act, especially because NASA lacks a deputy administrator to take over for Lightfoot, says John Logsdon, founder of The George Washington University’s Space Policy Institute in Washington, D.C.”Either the Senate should vote up or down on Bridenstine, or the White House should convince him to withdraw and nominate not only a new candidate as administrator, but also a candidate for deputy,” Logsdon says. “With the president’s recent praise of NASA, he owes it to the agency to provide with a worthy successor to Lightfoot.”Some House Republicans, including a fellow Oklahoman, echoed this view in interviews last week with E&E News. “I would hope whatever the circumstances are in the United States Senate, at some point we’ll decide the future of NASA’s importance—either confirm this guy or get a new guy,” Representative Frank Lucas (R–OK) told Climatewire.Lightfoot did not give a reason for his departure. In news that’s likely related, the agency announced late last week that another civilian, Steve Jurczyk, will now serve as NASA’s acting associate administrator, the position that Lightfoot previously held and the agency’s highest ranking civilian slot.The administration will need to name a new acting administrator to lead NASA, but it is not clear who is on that list.last_img read more

Ancient hookups between different species may explain Lake Victorias stunning diversity of

first_img Ancient hookups between different species may explain Lake Victoria’s stunning diversity of fish Ole Seehausen, an evolutionary biologist at the University of Bern who has studied cichlids for more than 25 years, wondered whether hybridization could have generated the genetic raw material. In earlier research, his team collected cichlids from the rivers and lakes surrounding Lake Victoria and partly sequenced each species’s DNA to build a family tree. Its branching pattern indicated that Lake Victoria’s cichlids are closely related to a species from the Congo River and one from the Upper Nile River watershed, the group reported last year in Nature Communications.A close look at all their genomes suggested the two river species hybridized with each other long ago. Seehausen proposed that during a warm spell about 130,000 years ago, water from tributaries of the Malagarasi River, itself a tributary of the Congo, temporarily flowed into Lake Victoria, bringing Congo fish into contact with Upper Nile fish.To explore the cichlids’ genetic history in more detail, Seehausen and postdocs Matt McGee, Joana Meier, and David Marques have now sequenced 450 whole cichlid genomes, representing many varieties of 150 species from the area’s lakes, and from the Congo, Upper Nile, and other nearby watersheds. Clues in the genomes suggest multiple episodes of mixing took place. Periods of drying have repeatedly caused Lake Victoria to disappear, and Seehausen and his team propose that fish in the remaining waterways evolved independently until wetter periods reunited them. This “fission-fusion-fission” process restored genetic diversity each time.About 15,000 years ago, three groups of fish, themselves products of the ancient hybridizations, came together in Lake Victoria as it filled again. Their ancestry provided the “standing variation” that natural selection could pick from to help the fish adapt to a vast range of niches, producing the cichlid bounty seen today. “Hybridization may turn out to be the most powerful engine of new species and new adaptations,” Seehausen says.”It’s mind-blowing,” says Dolph Schluter, an evolutionary biologist at The University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada. “All the variation required for speciation is already there” in the hybrids.Studies of other species also suggest standing variation can speed evolution. Biologists trying to understand how marine stickle-backs adapted so quickly to living in freshwater have discovered that a crucial gene variant was already present—in low percentages—in the fishes’ marine ancestors. At the meeting, researchers offered similar stories of standing variation jump-starting diversification, for example enabling long-winged beetles to evolve into short-winged ones on the Galápagos Islands. “I’ve never seen so many talks where you have evidence that genes are borrowed from old variation and further evolution is somehow facilitated by that,” Schluter says.Andrew Hendry, an evolutionary biologist at McGill University in Montreal, Canada, cautions colleagues not to completely dismiss new mutations in rapid species diversification: “What’s not clear to me is whether [the role of ancient hybridization] is a general phenomenon,” he says.Regardless, “The implications for conservation are blaring,” says Oliver Ryder, who heads conservation genetics efforts at the San Diego Zoo in California. Endangered species are currently managed as reproductively isolated units, and conservationists are reluctant to bolster populations by breeding the threatened animal with related species or populations. Eight years ago, however, a controversial program that mated Florida panthers with Texas cougars helped rescue the former from extinction. Studies such as Seehausen’s, says Ryder, suggest that in the long run, hybridization is important to preserving a species’s evolutionary potential. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe WAIMEA, HAWAII—In the shallow waters of Lake Victoria, the world’s largest tropical lake, swim some 500 species of cichlid fish with a dizzying variety of appearances, habitats, and behaviors. Genomic studies have shown they arose from a few ancestral species in just 15,000 years, a pace that has left researchers baffled about how so much genetic variation could have evolved so quickly. Now, extensive sequencing of cichlids from around Lake Victoria suggests much of it was there at the start, in the cichlids’ ancestors. Ancient and more recent dallying between cichlid species from multiple watersheds apparently led to genetically diverse hybrids that could quickly adapt to life in the lake’s many niches.Reported last week at the Origins of Adaptive Radiation meeting here, the work is “a tour de force, with many lines of evidence,” says Marguerite Butler, a functional morphologist at the University of Hawaii in Honolulu. It joins other research suggesting that hybridization is a powerful force in evolution. “What hybridization is doing is allowing the good stuff to be packed together,” Butler says.Some of Lake Victoria’s cichlids nibble plants; others feed on invertebrates; big ones feast on other fish; lake bottom lovers consume detritus. Species vary in length from a few centimeters to about 30 centimeters; come in an array of shapes, colors, and patterns; and dwell in different parts of the lake. Mutations don’t usually happen fast enough to produce such variety so quickly. “It’s been really hard to figure out what’s going on,” says Rosemary Gillespie, an evolutionary biologist at the University of California, Berkeley. By Elizabeth PennisiAug. 9, 2018 , 12:35 PMcenter_img (CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT): TIM ALEXANDER (2); MORITZ MUSCHICK Lake Victoria is home to hundreds of cichlid species, diverse in both appearance and behavior. Email Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)last_img read more

A lobsters underbelly is so tough you could use it instead of

first_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe By Sid PerkinsFeb. 19, 2019 , 4:40 PM Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) A lobster’s shell is pretty tough. But the transparent material on the underside of its tail may be even more amazing: Lab tests show the thin, stretchy substance is as sturdy as the rubber used to make tires.Like the shell surrounding a lobster’s body, the flexible material on the underside of the crustacean’s tail contains chitin, a fibrous material found in the exoskeletons of many insects and crustaceans. But the team’s tests revealed the substance is about 90% water, which lends the material elasticity. It also has a plywoodlike arrangement of microscopic layers, each with chitin fibers running largely in one direction, but with those in the neighboring layers running in somewhat different orientations. This same sort of arrangement helps give plywood consistent strength in several directions that a single layer of wood doesn’t have, the researchers note.The layered membrane is somewhat floppy and stretches to almost twice its normal length before it begins to stiffen, the team reports in a forthcoming issue of Acta Biomaterialia. Stretching the material further makes it get even stiffer, they note. Overall, the material is as tough as those used to make garden hoses, tires, and conveyor belts. Another advantage of the layered arrangement of the membrane: Cuts or gouges that penetrate only a few outer layers typically don’t propagate into the intact layers, which renders the material “fault tolerant.” ClassicStock/Alamy Stock Photo A lobster’s underbelly is so tough, you could use it instead of car tires Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Email Similar materials could be used to make flexible joints, such as elbows and knees, in armor or hard suits, the researchers suggest.last_img read more

The worlds largest bee vanished decades ago Now scientists have spotted it

first_img© Clay Bolt In 1981, the world’s biggest bee went missing—again. Wallace’s giant bee (above, right), which lives in the rainforests of Indonesia, is four times larger than a typical honey bee, with giant jaws and a wingspan of 6 centimeters—nearly as long as the short side of a dollar bill. (Those are the females; males are roughly half that size.) Now, the bee, which has been presumed extinct more than once, has been found again in the wild, a conservation group announced today.As part of a project to rediscover lost species around the globe, four entomologists and photographers scoured the North Moluccas in the Indonesian islands for Wallace’s giant bee (Megachile pluto). After 5 days of searching, they located a single female inside a termite’s nest high in the trees—the bees build their own nests inside such structures, defending them with tree sap that they collect with their strong jaws.The bee was first discovered in 1858 by naturalist Alfred Russell Wallace, who developed the theory of evolution by natural selection at the same time as Charles Darwin. At the time, Wallace noted the bee’s large jaws, which looked like those of a stag beetle. But Wallace was the last person on record to see one until an entomologist with the University of Georgia in Athens found several in 1981. The status of the species has been unknown ever since. The world’s largest bee vanished decades ago. Now, scientists have spotted it again Email By Erik StokstadFeb. 21, 2019 , 2:10 PM Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe One threat to the bees is insect collectors, who may be targeting the species, according to a statement from Robin Moore of Global Wildlife Conservation, a nonprofit in Austin that sponsored the search. The larger concern is loss of habitat, as Indonesia’s forests are being cut down for agriculture. The researchers want to create a conservation plan for the species—and Global Wildlife Conservation hopes the publicity of the record-setting bee will help raise awareness for its protection.last_img read more

Embryo experiments take baby steps toward growing human organs in livestock

first_img Embryo experiments take ‘baby steps’ toward growing human organs in livestock By Kelly ServickJun. 26, 2019 , 11:50 AM The perpetual shortage of human organs for transplant has researchers turning to farm animals. Several biotech companies are genetically engineering pigs to make their organs more compatible with the human body. But some scientists are pursuing a different solution: growing fully human organs in pigs, sheep, or other animals, which could then be harvested for transplants.The idea is biologically daunting and ethically fraught. But a few teams are chipping away at a key roadblock: getting stem cells of one species to thrive in the embryo of another. Last month, a U.S. group reported in a preprint that it had grown chimpanzee stem cells in monkey embryos. And newly loosened regulations in Japan have encouraged researchers to seek approval for experiments to boost the survival of human cells in the developing embryos of rodents and pigs. Insoo Hyun, a bioethicist at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio, says the work is being done responsibly. Efforts such as the new chimp-monkey chimeras represent “baby steps forward, gathering data as you go,” he says. “And I think that’s a wise approach.”Ultimately, the researchers envision reprogramming a person’s cells to a primitive developmental state that can form most any tissue and injecting these induced pluripotent stem (IPS) cells into another species’s embryo. The embryo would be implanted in the uterus of a surrogate, and allowed to grow to full size to serve as an organ donor. The IPS cells could come from the person awaiting transplant or, in a potentially faster and less costly approach, human organs could be grown in advance from cells from other donors, matched for key immune signaling proteins to prevent rejection. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Emailcenter_img Successful rodent chimera experiments, such as this mouse embryo harboring rat heart cells (red), have been hard to re-create with human cells.  BELMONTE LAB, SALK INSTITUTE FOR BIOLOGICAL STUDIES Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) So far, the feat has been modeled only in rodents. In 2010, stem cell biologist Hiromitsu Nakauchi and his team at the University of Tokyo reported growing rat pancreases in mice that couldn’t form pancreases of their own. In 2017, Nakauchi and colleagues treated diabetes in mice by giving them transplants of insulin-producing mouse pancreas tissue grown in a rat.But the success in rodents hasn’t held up between larger and more evolutionarily distant animals. In 2017, cell biologist Jun Wu and colleagues in Juan Carlos Izpisua Belmonte’s lab at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies in San Diego, California, reported that when they injected pig embryos with human IPS cells and implanted the embryos into sows, about half of the resulting fetuses were stunted and slow growing. Those that were normal size had very few human cells after a month of gestation.Wu, who is now at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, has since explored how human stem cells interact in a lab dish with stem cells from nonhuman primates, rats, mice, sheep, and cows. He’s found what he calls “a very exciting phenomenon: a competition between cells of different species.” Pitted against cells of distantly related animals, human cells tend to die off, and the team is now trying to understand the mechanism. “I think we are almost there,” Wu says.But competition isn’t the only problem. Primate IPS cells are also more developmentally advanced, or “primed,” than the “naïve” rodent stem cells used in the earlier successful chimera experiments. They are therefore less likely to survive in a chimeric embryo, says Nakauchi, who also has a lab at Stanford University in Palo Alto, California. To help primate IPS cells thrive, his Stanford team and collaborators endowed them with a gene that prevents cell death. In the experiments reported last month, they tested how the modified cells would fare in the embryo of a closely related primate species.To avoid raising ethical concerns, the team decided not to use human IPS cells. If a nonhuman primate embryo with added human cells were allowed to develop in a surrogate and many human cells survived and proliferated, the result would be an unprecedented primate chimera. “People are concerned that the boundary between humans and animals could become blurred,” says Misao Fujita, a bioethicist at Kyoto University in Japan who recently conducted a survey of attitudes toward animal-human chimeras in the Japanese public. Respondents were particularly worried that such animals could have enhanced intelligence or carry human sperm and egg cells.Nakauchi’s team instead modified IPS cells from the closest human relative, the chimpanzee, and put them into rhesus macaque embryos. They found that, compared with unmodified chimpanzee IPS cells, the cells with the survival-promoting gene were more likely to persist in the 2 days after they were inserted into a 5-day-old monkey embryo. It’s hard to keep a monkey embryo alive in a dish for much longer than a week, Nakauchi says, but his team plans to grow its chimeras further by implanting them into the uteruses of female macaques “in the near future.”Nakauchi also has submitted proposals to a government committee in Japan to put the survival-promoting gene into human stem cells and inject them into mouse, rat, and pig embryos—but not nonhuman primates—that lack a gene critical to pancreas development. The researchers hope that, as in the earlier rodent experiments, the human cells will begin to form the missing pancreas. His team would implant the embryos in surrogate animals but remove them for study before they reach full term. The proposals are an initial test for new legal guidelines in Japan, which in March lifted an outright ban on culturing human-animal chimeras past 14 days or putting them into a uterus.Other groups are honing different recipes for chimera-friendly stem cells. In January, a team from Yale University and the Axion Research Foundation in Hamden, Connecticut, described culturing monkey IPS cells with chemicals that prompted gene expression patterns like those of mouse embryonic stem cells, which are more likely to survive in a chimera. In April, Yale University stem cell biologist Alejandro De Los Angeles reported that the technique prompted similar gene expression changes in human IPS cells. He’s now considering testing how these cells hold up in a mouse or other nonhuman embryo.Such work faces hurdles in the United States. There is no outright ban, but in 2015 the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Maryland, froze its review of grant applications for research that involves putting human pluripotent stem cells—whether IPS cells or cells from human embryos—into early embryos of nonhuman vertebrates. After protest from some researchers, the agency in 2016 proposed lifting the broad prohibition while keeping a funding ban on specific chimera experiments, including inserting human stem cells into early nonhuman primate embryos and breeding chimeric animals that may have human egg or sperm cells. The proposal is “still under consideration,” according to an NIH spokesperson.The moratorium “has had a very significant impact on the progress of this field,” says Pablo Ross, a reproductive biologist at the University of California, Davis, who does chimera research. “Some of the concerns that are raised are to be taken seriously, but I think we have the tools to do that, and [these concerns] shouldn’t prevent us from pursuing this goal.”Because of the slow pace of chimera research, even some of its proponents predict that xenotransplantation—the use of nonhuman tissue, such as modified pig organs, for transplants—will beat their approach to the clinic. “Xenotransplantation is close to prime time now,” Wu says, and “we are lagging behind.” But the possibility of creating organs that are a better match for their human recipients keeps his lab and others poring over stem cells and embryos, hoping to narrow the species divide.last_img read more

Larry King accidentally rearended JFK

first_imgLarry King is a well-known figure in today’s media. In his 60-odd year career, he has worked in television and on the radio. According to Biography, he was born November 19, 1933, as Lawrence Harvey Zeiger. A chance meeting with a CBS announcer started his career when the announcer told him to go to Florida because they were hiring inexperienced broadcasters.Larry King in March 2017. Photo by Gage Skidmore CC BY-SA 3.0He went to Miami and got hired at WAHR, doing odd jobs around the station until one of their male announcers quit, and young Zeiger took the job.Just minutes before his first broadcast the station manager decided he needed a new name, since Zeiger sounded too “ethnic.” The station manager chose King, after seeing an ad for King’s Wholesale Liquor, and Larry King was off and running.King’s mugshot from 1971 arrest in Miami.In his career, King did announcing and newspaper work before starting a nightly coast-to-coast talk show in 1978. His reputation grew, and Ted Turner hired King to do the first international talk show for the just-beginning Cable News Network (CNN).He stayed there for 25 years, stepping down as host in 2010. King also appeared in several television shows and movies as himself and did voice work for a couple of animated films.King was known for two quirks of his personal life: his wives, and his driving.King during a recording of his Larry King Live program at the Pentagon in Arlington, Virginia, in 2006.King has had a total of eight marriages to seven different women. His first marriage was to his high school sweetheart at the age of 18, according to People magazine.It was allegedly annulled by her parents the following year, as they didn’t approve. He married Alene Akins, a playboy bunny, twice; during the first, King adopted Alene’s son from her first marriage.King with wife Shawn Southwick at a Beverly Hills gala, 2014. Photo by Neon Tommy CC BY-SA 2.0The next time they wed they had a daughter together. Most of his marriages have been relatively brief, seven years or less, but he has been married to his current wife, Shawn, since 1997.5 things you didn’t know about TV legend Larry KingIn September of 2017, King was involved in a car accident in Beverly Hills. According to TMZ, the then 83-year-old King was seen assessing the damage to his Lincoln MK and to the Mercedes-Benz that was the other vehicle involved.Although both drivers were looked over by paramedics as soon as they arrived, it was determined that neither driver was injured.Larry King at the 70th Annual Peabody Awards. Photo by 70th Annual Peabody Awards CC By 2.0Police said it was unclear who was at fault and didn’t issue a citation to either driver, although witnesses did say that King hit the other vehicle.That wasn’t the first such accident that King was involved in. The first time Larry King was in a collision was in 1958. King told the story to Jimmy Kimmel in 2010.Larry King. Photo by Thor Nielsen / NTNU CC BY-SA 2.0King was a young disc jockey living in Miami. He and three of his friends decided to drive to Palm Beach, which none of them had seen before.While gawking at the scenery, King accidentally rear-ended another car while coming up on a red light. What makes this story remarkable is that the driver of the other car was Senator John F. Kennedy. Kennedy got out of the car and asked “How could you hit me? It’s 10:30 on a Sunday morning, there are only two cars on the road. How could you hit me?”Deborah Tannen and Larry King at an ASAE event at the Kennedy Center, taken on January 5, 2013 by DB KingKing apologized and offered to exchange insurance information with Kennedy, but instead, Senator Kennedy had them raise their hands and swear that King and his companions would vote for him when he made his presidential run. When Kimmel asked King if he did, King said: “Of course I did!”Read another story from us: “Stone Face” Buster Keaton – King of Early Stunts who Broke his Neck without even KnowingIn 2008 King and his then-wife, Shawn, were involved in another accident, but King wasn’t driving the vehicle. After finding out who he was, the people in the other car sued King for $50,000, claiming severe injury; but Kings wife strongly refuted that assertion, and said it was a frivolous lawsuit to get money from a celebrity.last_img read more

New European Union Timeline to handover

first_img Best Of Express P Rajagopal, Saravana Bhavan founder sentenced to life for murder, dies european union, new european union, eu timeline, new eu timeline, eu elections, brussels, eu election news, eu parliament news, new eu parliament, world news, brexit, brexit deal, indian express European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker and European Union Chief Brexit Negotiator Michel Barnier speak during a plenary session of the European Parliament in Brussels, Belgium. (Source: REUTERS/File)European Union leaders meet in Brussels on Tuesday, two days after an election to the European Parliament returned a more fragmented pro-EU centre and stronger nationalist groups. December 1: Tusk’s successor due to take office at the Council. Related News Advertising Post Comment(s) Aegean lessons Advertising Advertising October 31: Britain is due to leave, deal or no deal — though a further delay to Brexit is also possible.November 1: The Commission is due to take office. If it has not been confirmed by Parliament, Juncker’s team would carry on. Draghi’s successor is due to take over the ECB in Frankfurt. Chandrayaan-2 gets new launch date days after being called off Ayodhya dispute: Mediation to continue till July 31, SC hearing likely from August 2 UK’s Boris Johnson declines to comment on plan to facilitate a no-deal Brexit UK economy probably shrank for first time in seven years More Explained Taking stock of monsoon rain From 1600 GMT, the 28 leaders, including outgoing British Prime Minister Theresa May, meet over dinner to debate jobs.June: Parliamentary groups will negotiate among themselves and with Tusk, seeking to defend the legislature’s demand that government chiefs nominate a party candidate to succeed Jean-Claude Juncker as president of the executive European Commission. Many national leaders — foremost among them the powerful Macron — are resisting that idea.June 20-21: Leaders aim to agree on Juncker’s successor and that of European Central Bank President Mario Draghi. They may also agree who will succeed Tusk himself as president of the European Council and EU foreign policy chief Federica Mogherini.July 2-4: New Parliament convenes in Strasbourg. It should choose its own president to succeed Antonio Tajani on July 3 — another job in the mix for the bargaining over key EU posts. July 16-18: Parliament sits again in Strasbourg. This is the earliest it could endorse a new Commission president.July-August: If a Commission president is agreed, he or she would then build an executive team, taking one commissioner from each member state and giving them portfolios. If there is no deal on a successor, then more summits may be needed. In 2014, Tusk and Mogherini were nominated at a summit in late August.September: New commissioners face hearings in Parliament. Some, notably those nominated by eurosceptic governments in the likes of Italy, Hungary or Poland, could hit resistance but MEPs can only block the Commission as a whole, not individuals.October 22-24: Parliament due to vote in Strasbourg to confirm the new Commission as whole. It can withhold its endorsement. By Reuters |Brussels | Updated: May 28, 2019 3:26:13 pm They will discuss the succession to key EU jobs over the coming months. Here is a timeline to change at the top:May 28: Leaders party groups in the newly elected Parliament meet at 0800 GMT and hold news conference at 1000 GMT. They are expected to endorse a call for national leaders to nominate a lead candidate, or Spitzenkandidat, from a winning party to run the executive European Commission. The first placed centre-right EPP wants Manfred Weber, the centre-left Frans Timmermans. So far, four pro-EU parties seem to have struggled to adopt a common position.This afternoon, various national leaders are holding private talks. For example, liberal French President Emmanuel Macron and Socialist Spanish Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez lunch with the liberal Belgian and Dutch leaders and Portugal’s Socialist premier. Centre-right leaders including German Chancellor Angela Merkel will also meet together. EU summit chair Donald Tusk, who will run negotiations on jobs, will also have several meetings.last_img read more

Hong Kongs retreat chips away at Xi Jinpings iron image

first_img Hong Kong democracy protests dissipate “Pragmatic leaders adjust their policies when they become too costly,” she said.Still, the controversy over the legislation has hardened views around the world toward Xi’s China, particularly regarding the lack of judicial independence or basic rights for defendants plunged into the Chinese judicial system.The idea of a law that would allow transfers of criminal suspects into the Communist Party-controlled system provoked fear among Hong Kong’s 7 million residents, including business executives, consultants and investors who have made the city a global hub of finance, trade and transportation.“The proposed law, the protests and the Hong Kong government’s response has heightened international awareness of the repressive policies of the Xi era,” said Anne-Marie Brady, a professor at the University of Canterbury in Christchurch, New Zealand, adding that China was not living up to its pledge to honor Hong Kong’s autonomy for 50 years after the 1997 takeover.During Xi’s four-day trip for previously scheduled summit meetings in Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan, the events in Hong Kong were portrayed in China’s state media not as a retreat but as a well-considered move receiving Beijing’s full support.Read | Hong Kong protestors earn praise after parting to allow an ambulance through“Sometimes we have to be on duty on our birthday,” Putin told Xi in a carefully choreographed exchange at a hotel in the Tajik capital, Dushanbe, even as Hong Kong’s chief executive, Carrie Lam, prepared to announce the suspension of the legislation.Putin presented the man he has taken to calling a dear friend with a decorative vase, a cake and an entire box of ice cream that Xi had previously pronounced as the most delicious in the world.China, Xi Jinping, Hong Kong, Hong Kong protests, Hong Kong demonstrations, Carrie Lam, Russia, Vladimir Putin, Putin, Comminist party of China,US China, US china Trade war, Trump, Trump-Xi, International relations, World news, Indian Express news, Latest news During Xi’s four-day trip for previously scheduled summit meetings in Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan, the events in Hong Kong were portrayed in China’s state media not as a retreat but as a well-considered move receiving Beijing’s full support. (New York Times)Putin’s party for Xi was broadcast on China’s state television network, which had not even mentioned the protests in Hong Kong — some of the largest since Britain handed over the territory in 1997 — until Friday night. It described them as riots sponsored by foreign actors.Both men are of similar age and temperament, sharing an abiding fear of foreign efforts to undermine their rule. Both have experienced the simmering fury of constituents nonetheless, suggesting that popular sentiment still plays a role in the era of strongman leaders. Putin, too, had to bow to public pressure in the past week following protests over a false arrest of a prominent investigative journalist, Ivan Golunov.In the end, Beijing and Hong Kong decided that they already faced enough challenges with the economic headwinds and trade tensions with the United States heading into the Group of 20 summit in Japan this month, according to a person in Hong Kong with detailed knowledge of local policymaking, speaking on the condition of anonymity because of the political sensitivities inflamed by the protests.President Donald Trump and Xi are expected to meet in less than two weeks at the summit, in Osaka, although formal trade talks between them have not yet been confirmed.Read | The murder case that lit the fuse in Hong KongXi has never publicly commented on the Hong Kong matter, but two of the seven members of the governing Politburo Standing Committee that he presides over — Wang Yang and Han Zheng — expressed their support for the legislation.On Friday, a vice foreign minister in Beijing summoned the deputy chief of mission at the U.S. Embassy to complain about a congressional bill, drawn up in support of the protesters, that called for a broad review of Washington’s relationship with Hong Kong.China, Xi Jinping, Hong Kong, Hong Kong protests, Hong Kong demonstrations, Carrie Lam, Russia, Vladimir Putin, Putin, Comminist party of China,US China, US china Trade war, Trump, Trump-Xi, International relations, World news, Indian Express news, Latest news Xi has never publicly commented on the Hong Kong matter, but two of the seven members of the governing Politburo Standing Committee that he presides over — Wang Yang and Han Zheng — expressed their support for the legislation. (New York Times)The suspension of the legislation in Hong Kong — which stopped short of dropping it altogether — has fueled concerns that Lam’s retreat was a tactical one, probably endorsed at least tacitly by Beijing. She met with senior Chinese officials Friday before announcing her decision the following day, a person with knowledge of the government’s policymaking said. She declined to comment Saturday on any private meetings she might have had.Xi is not prone to concession or compromise, especially when under threat, as Trump has learned during his public efforts to negotiate an end to the trade war between the United States and China. This latest setback, analysts said, could be merely temporary. “This further chips away at the image of Xi as an all-powerful, omnicompetent and visionary leader,” Blanchette added.The demonstrations also made clear that after 22 years, Beijing has had minimal success in weaving Hong Kong into the country’s central political, economic and security systems, all dominated by the Communist Party. But if Xi and his cadres want to proceed more forcefully to bind Hong Kong to the mainland, they must also see how that could invite new waves of protest.“This is an important time to see whether Xi is a rigid ideologue like Mao, or the pragmatist that previous Chinese leaders like Deng, Jiang and Hu were,” said Susan Shirk, chairwoman of the 21st Century China Program at the University of California, San Diego, referring to Xi’s predecessors.As evidence of a pragmatic tinge, she cited recent adjustments that Xi made — at least cosmetically — to his signature “One Belt, One Road” international infrastructure initiative following criticism that it was ensnaring countries in indebtedness to Beijing. Advertising I won’t quit, says Hong Kong’s hounded chief More Explained Hong Kong crisis: UK says 1984 rights treaty with China is ‘as valid as ever’ China’s leader, Xi Jinping, was in Tajikistan on Saturday, celebrating his 66th birthday with Russian President Vladimir Putin when the political crisis in Hong Kong took a dramatic turn with an unexpected retreat in the face of mass protests.Xi’s trip fortuitously gave him some distance from the events in Hong Kong, where the leadership Saturday suspended its push for legislation to allow extraditions to mainland China. But the measure had been backed by Beijing, and there was no mistaking that the reversal was a stinging setback for him.The move, the biggest concession to public pressure during Xi’s nearly seven years as China’s paramount leader, suggests that there are still limits to his power, especially involving events outside the mainland, even as he has governed with an increasingly authoritarian grip. Related News Best Of Express Taking stock of monsoon rain Virat Kohli won’t have a say in choosing new coach “Postponement is not withdrawal,” said Ryan Hass, a fellow at the Brookings Institution who served as director for China at the National Security Council during the Obama administration, in an email. “Beijing likely will be willing to let Lam take heat for mismanaging the process of securing passage of the bill, bide its time, and wait for the next opportunity to advance the legislation.” After Masood Azhar blacklisting, more isolation for Pakistan Post Comment(s) Advertising “This is a defeat for Xi, even if Beijing frames this as a tactical retreat,” said Jude Blanchette, a consultant and author of a new book on the revival of revolutionary ideology in the country, “China’s New Red Guards.”On Sunday, hundreds of thousands of people marched again in Hong Kong despite the government’s concession a day before, insisting that the legislation be withdrawn while making new demands, including for an investigation into the use of excessive force by police in clashes with protesters. The large turnout was a surprise, and it means the crisis is not over for Xi. Given how he has consolidated power in China, he might find it increasingly difficult to avoid blame.The risk for Xi is not limited to Hong Kong. Though he has no visible rivals, he could face criticism in the leadership. And the mainland government’s censors, at least, are clearly concerned that the extraordinary events might inspire Xi’s beleaguered critics in mainland China, and they have been working vigorously to block the news from spreading.In Pictures | Hundreds of thousands take to streets in renewed Hong Kong protests Advertising By New York Times |Beijing | Updated: June 17, 2019 1:31:50 pm China, Xi Jinping, Hong Kong, Hong Kong protests, Hong Kong demonstrations, Carrie Lam, Russia, Vladimir Putin, Putin, Comminist party of China,US China, US china Trade war, Trump, Trump-Xi, International relations, World news, Indian Express news, Latest news Demonstrators durin­g a prote­st against a government proposal that could allow extraditions to mainland China, in Hong Kong on June 16, 2019. (The New York Times)(Written by: Steven Lee Myers) LiveKarnataka floor test: Will Kumaraswamy’s 14-month-old govt survive? last_img read more

As Gurgaon resident drove traveler his Aadhaar bailed out accused in 16

first_imgWritten by Sofi Ahsan | Chandigarh | Published: July 14, 2019 8:46:01 am Gurgaon man stabs wife, two children to death, hangs himself, leaves note behind Advertising “A total of 16 FIRs have been registered against the accused persons in this regard,” reads the affidavit filed by Akil, adding one accused Deepak Nair, a Delhi resident, has been arrested in 11 cases and another accused, Ravi Kumar, was arrested in April 2017 in an FIR but was released later on bail. Yet another accused, Om Prakash, who is alleged to have prepared the documents has not been arrested, the police commissioner said further.The police commissioner, in the affidavit, suggested to the court that an online verification of Aadhaar cards be ensured before accepting the surety bond and also prior police verification be asked for in suspicious cases. The High Court on July 3 disposed of Gulab Singh’s plea after an assurance from the State counsel that the SIT “would go to the root of the matter and take suitable action required under law”.It was in August 2016 that Gulab Singh received summons for the first time from a Gurgaon court. When he apprised the court regarding the fraud, an inquiry was conducted on orders of the District and Sessions Judge, which revealed that the RC was a genuine document but the Aadhaar card was forged. An FIR was ordered to be registered and soon other cases, where his RC and purported Aadhaar card had been used to bail out the accused, came to forth. The accused persons would use Gulab Singh’s name and address but change the photo and Aadhaar number everytime. Related News Haryana: Sacked employee among three held for murder of doctor in Karnal Sonipat boy fakes abduction, demands Rs 5 crore from dad His documents, including forged versions of his Aadhaar card, were used as surety in 16 criminal cases since 2016 to bail out the accused persons. Haryana Police has informed Punjab and Haryana High Court that a Special Investigation Team has been constituted to probe the matter and 16 FIRs have been registered till date.Gulab Singh, a tempo traveler driver from Sancholi village of Sohna in Gurgaon, in May approached the High Court through his counsel Atul Yadav seeking directions to the police and lower courts at Sohna, Pataudi and Gurgaon to not summon him in the criminal cases as an enquiry has already been conducted by judicial officer Kavita Yadav in which it was found that that his documents were forged and given as surety or guarantee. Stating that he is a “poor person”, Gulab Singh’s plea said that he is unable to afford to reach the different courts in pursuance to the summons to provide the same answer.In May, the High Court directed Commissioner of Gurgaon Police to apprise it regarding the action he proposes to take against the guilty and to prevent such frauds. Commissioner Mohd Akil has informed the High Court in a reply that a special investigation team (SIT) under ACP Pataudi has been constituted and it has found that Gulab’s name was misused by the accused persons by submitting false surety bonds and bail bonds in the courts by misusing his Aadhaar and RC and by preparing a false Jamabandi in his name. haryana police, gurgaon police, punjab and haryana high court, high court of punjab and haryana, high court of punjab, high court of haryana, india news, Indian Express Haryana Police has informed Punjab and Haryana High Court that a Special Investigation Team has been constitutedThree years back when 47-year-old Gulab Singh gave a photocopy of his Aadhaar card and the registration certificate (RC) of his vehicle to an agent for payment of road tax, little did he know that soon he would receive back-to-back summons from the courts in Gurgaon. Advertising Post Comment(s)last_img read more

Interstate gang of opium smugglers busted kingpin among 2 held

first_img Advertising Moga man suspected of reporting power theft chained, assaulted; FIR against five Bargari sacrilege case: Villagers say, ‘Enough clashes in past….we don’t want to be part of politics anymore’ By Express News Service |Jalandhar | Published: July 15, 2019 4:44:24 am Advertising Jalandhar, Jalandhar news, drug smugglers arrested in jalandhar, punjab drugs, drugs in punjab, punjab drug problem, punjab drug addiction The SSP said that the youths were identified as Punjab Singh (25) and Daljeet Singh (25) from Patti Palla village in Amritsar. He said that both had hidden the opium in a ‘spine support type belt’. (Representative Image)The Jalandhar Rural Police on Sunday busted an interstate gang of drug smugglers, arresting two of its members including the kingpin and seizing 16 kg opium. Related News Senior Superintendent of Police (SSP) Navjot Singh Mahal said on the basis of a tip-off, the CIA staff Jalandhar was checking vehicles at Mallian Mod under Kartarpur police station Saturday night. They stopped an I-20 car that was approaching the check post at high speed. However, Mahal said that instead of stopping the car, two youths seated in it tried to drive away, but were stopped with the help of barricades.The SSP said that the youths were identified as Punjab Singh (25) and Daljeet Singh (25) from Patti Palla village in Amritsar. He said that both had hidden the opium in a ‘spine support type belt’.Some of the opium was also recovered from the hardboard of the rear doors of the car. Punjab: Dera suffered in fight between 2 parties, says its political wing head Mahal also claimed that Punjab Singh, who was now involved in “narco-terrorism”, belongs to a family which was “actively involved in terrorist activities during the black days” in the state.He also said that Punjab Singh had earlier been arrested with 800 grams of opium and was out on bail, and was heading the gang that smuggled opium from Bihar into the state. Post Comment(s)last_img read more